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It's A Bird ... It's A Plane ... It's Superman (1966 Original Broadway Cast) Cast Recording

4.1 out of 5 stars 35 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Cast Recording, November 24, 1992
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  • Sample this album Artist - Artist (Sample)
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2:51
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2:04
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1:57
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1:51
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2:55
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3:27
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4:03
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8
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2:36
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9
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2:25
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10
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2:28
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11
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3:15
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12
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2:06
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13
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1:57
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14
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2:42
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15
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2:46
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16
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2:59
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17
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1:42
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18
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2:33
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19
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1:29
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20
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3:38
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2:30
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Product Details

  • Performer: Lee Adams
  • Audio CD (November 24, 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Cast Recording
  • Label: Masterworks Broadway
  • Run Time: 57 minutes
  • ASIN: B0000027WB
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #186,322 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jaime J. Weinman on April 7, 2002
Format: Audio CD
SUPERMAN is one of those flop musicals that was just so, so, so close to being a hit. It had all the right ingredients: A very funny book (by Robert Benton and David Newman, who would hit it big the next year as screenwriters of BONNIE AND CLYDE), a tuneful score with at least one obvious hit ("You've Got Possibilities"), a fine cast, a distinctive production, and a rave review from the New York TIMES. So what happened? Basically, the story was weak. (Story counts; Strouse and Adams' next show, APPLAUSE, had a disappointing score and book, but the strength of its storyline helped carry it to the hit column.) The main plot hooks -- Superman doubting himself; Lois Lane considering marrying someone else -- weren't particularly interesting, and the show was dominated to an inordinate extent by characters who were really peripheral: Jack Cassidy as a Winchell-type columnist and Linda Lavin as his secretary. Maybe some of the show's problems were due to Harold Prince's relative inexperience as a director. If Newman and Benton would reunite to strengthen the story just a little (without losing too many of the hilarious lines from their book), this show really could be the hit it should have been in 1966.
Until then, we have the album, and it's great. Except for one horrible number ("It's Super Nice," which apparently was even worse onstage), it doesn't sound like a flop; Strouse and Adams are at their considerable peak with wonderful tunes and witty lyrics (Lois sings of Superman: "Tell me please, when will he learn it's not some silly fly-by-night affair?").
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Format: Audio CD
I was lucky enough to have seen "Superman" on Broadway and it was one of the most enjoyable times I've had in a Broaway theater. Yes, it had it's faults, but as a show that entertained an audience, it was (to use a cliche) SUPER. I left the theater smiling and humming the music. There were great flying sequences, break apart props as Superman accomplished his feats, great cheorography including the fights. There was one very funny bit during one of Clark Kent's songs, a telephone booth followed him around the stage waiting for him to get in and change to Superman. A really FUN show.
One of the biggest faults was that the starring role was NOT Superman, but that of an unscrupulous newspaper columunist. Jack Cassidy was given star billing for this part over Bob Holiday as Clark Kent/Superman. This pulled the show somewhat out of focus.Good as Cassidy was, it was wrong to emphasize his part.
Bob Holiday was wonderful in the title role. It's a shame that he didn't go on to other roles. He was every inch Superman and had a great voice and imposing presance. He was able to convincingly create two different characters - Kent and Superman - in one performance. However, the major musical numbers were given to Cassidy as the "star".
One of the true joys of the show was Linda Lavin. Her two songs were absolute show stoppers. "You've Got Possibilities" is a really great show tune. It was obvious she would be the major star she has become. Her performance alone, was a reason to see this show.
The other female lead, Patricia Marand, was also wonderful, again, she should have gone on to other Broadway shows. I did see her opposite Yul Brynner in a tour of "King and I" as Anna and she was magnificent. She is drop dead beautiful, a wonderful actress and singer.
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By A Customer on July 7, 1999
Format: Audio CD
If you didn't think that the tale of Superman could be turned into a musical, well, you are in for a surprise. This is an old-style musical with it's toungue firmly planted in its cheek-no melodrama here. Our high school performed this musical, and it was the most fun I ever had. The songs are goofy and funny, and the story is just as fun. This goes along side Charles Strouse's "Bye Bye Birdie" as a pure, fun-filled delight. It is a hip and cool musical, and this soundtrack is an excellent primer to the actual show.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
In 1966, the same year that Batman was all the rage on TV, Superman was on the Broadway stage. I was born in 1967, so I never saw the Broadway show, but based on the cast album, it was a pretty good show. For whatever reason, the show wasn't a hit and ran for less than four months. Perhaps the problem was that the lead character wasn't Superman himself, but rather a heretofore unmentioned Daily Planet columnist named Max Mencken. Oh well, the cast album is enjoyable anyway.
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Format: Audio CD
Some reviewers below have attributed the short run of this Broadway musical to the obvious conclusion that it was a [commercial] flop.
NOT SO! It was a huge sell-out success [with an unprecedented four matinees per week in addition to the standard 6 nightlies per week], and would have continued for many years were it not for the ongoing suit between Superman's creators, Mssrs Siegel & Shuster, and DC Comics. Siegel and Shuster's lawyers served notice on the producers of the show that the profits would be frozen as being in question due to DC not having the right to option the character, and the legal situation was though so expensive to fight from the producers end that they folded the show. A similar situation forced another critically and commercial Broadway hit to cease: A Day In Hollywood A Night In The Ukraine, a musical revue which featured three young and brilliant actors succesfully playing the roles of the Marx Bros [especially the woman mime who played a male Harpo], was sadly sued out of existence by the heirs of the brothers.
As librettist/lyricist Dick Vosburgh puts in his liner notes to the original Broadway cast album, few could have dreamed that he, "a Marx [Brothers] obsessed New Jersey-born comedy writer living in England, would adapt [Anton Chekhov's play] The Bear as a musical in the [Marx Brothers'] Night at the Opera style, find a man capable of both playing the 'Chico' [Marx] role, and of writing the music [Frank Lazarus], open in a tiny off West End theater..., see it transfer to the West End..., win a couple of awards..., and wind up a Broadway hit directed and choreographed by Tommy Tune...." (Opening at the Golden Theatre in New York on May 1, 1980, the show ran a healthy 588 performances.)
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