This title is not currently available for purchase
Blackbirds (Miriam Black Book 1) by [Wendig, Chuck]
Kindle App Ad

Blackbirds (Miriam Black Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 322 customer reviews

See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"

Length: 384 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Blue Moon: Mundy's Landing Book Two by Wendy Corsi Staub
"Blue Moon" by Wendy Corsi Staub
New York Times best-selling author Wendy Corsi Staub returns to Mundy’s Landing—a small town where bygone bloodshed has become big business. Learn more | See related books
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Trailer-park tension, horrified hilarity, and sheer terror mixed with deft characterization and razor plotting. I literally could not put it down." - Lilith Saintcrow, author of Night Shift and Working for the Devil "Blackbirds is a horror story, a traveling story, a story of loss and what it takes to make things right. It's a story about fate and how sometimes, if we wrestle with it hard enough, maybe we can change it. Blackbirds is the kind of book that doesn't let go even after you've put it down and nobody else could have made it shine like Chuck Wendig." - Stephen Blackmoore, author, City of the Lost and Dead Things "Mean, moody and mysterious, Blackbirds is a noir joyride peppered with black humour, wry observation, and visceral action. Fans of Chuck Wendig will not be disappointed." - Adam Christopher, author of Empire State... Blackbirds is "one *dark* book. Think Six Feet Under co-written by Stephen King and Chuck Palaniuk... Wendig's surefooted prose means that this ride is well worth sticking your thumb out for." 4 **** SFX Magazine

Review

"Trailer-park tension, horrified hilarity, and sheer terror mixed with deft characterization and razor plotting. I literally could not put it down." - Lilith Saintcrow, author of Night Shift and Working for the Devil "Blackbirds is a horror story, a traveling story, a story of loss and what it takes to make things right. It's a story about fate and how sometimes, if we wrestle with it hard enough, maybe we can change it. Blackbirds is the kind of book that doesn't let go even after you've put it down and nobody else could have made it shine like Chuck Wendig." - Stephen Blackmoore, author, City of the Lost and Dead Things "Mean, moody and mysterious, Blackbirds is a noir joyride peppered with black humour, wry observation, and visceral action. Fans of Chuck Wendig will not be disappointed." - Adam Christopher, author of Empire State... Blackbirds is "one *dark* book. Think Six Feet Under co-written by Stephen King and Chuck Palaniuk... Wendig's surefooted prose means that this ride is well worth sticking your thumb out for." 4 **** SFX Magazine

Product Details

  • File Size: 653 KB
  • Print Length: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Angry Robot (April 24, 2012)
  • Publication Date: April 24, 2012
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007B2D4DU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #392,230 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Chuck Wendig's Blackbirds is the story of Miriam Black, a young woman afflicted by the unfortunate ability to see in precise and accurate detail the manner in which anyone she touches will die. Living a transient lifestyle from one cheap motel to the next, Miriam makes a ghoulish living by hovering close to people whose deaths are imminent and scavenging from their corpses after the event. She's callous, abrasive and bitter, keeping the world at arm's length with a steady stream of sarcasm and profanity. And yet -

Miriam meets someone in whose death she may be implicated. As she struggles to change what horrific experience has taught her is an inevitability, Wendig peels back the layers of his misbegotten heroine. Miriam's fearsome misanthropy is the shell of a heart sorely hurt. The great tragedy of her past is compounded again and again by misguided attempts to atone for her mistakes, attempts with invariably horrible consequences. Years of cruel experience have taught her that she is nothing but a poisoned chalice. Despite that, Miriam spits in the eye of her own completely justified fatalism and sets out to change the future.

On one level, Blackbirds is a snarling, vicious crime thriller populated by con men, druglords and psychotic assassins up against a prickly psychic heroine hauling a truckload of emotional baggage. It stinks of cheap booze, bad sex, greasy food, tire smoke, festering wounds and smouldering cigarettes. You don't have to dig far beneath the surface to get at the good stuff, though. Blackbirds is upfront about asking big questions about free will and destiny, but more intimate subjects, like death, loss and the harmful consequences of deliberately becoming physically and socially distanced from humanity, are laid bare as well.
Read more ›
Comment 43 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When you look at a cover for a book like "Blackbirds" you think you're going to get something in keeping with the ethereal image; but Chuck Wendig offers something else entirely-- and that's not a bad thing at all.

Miriam Black can see a person's death whenever she makes skin-to-skin contact: she knows the exact moment and circumstances and sees it all with disturbing clarity. Miriam has adapted to her strange life by becoming a scavenger of the dead. Knowing when someone will die alone doesn't provide Miriam with a living much beyond subsistence level, but it enables her to drift along the margins of society without having to interact with people beyond a superficial level-- which is just how Miriam likes it.

Miriam knows that interference with fate is not an option-- she's tried to help people in the past but it only seems to cement the final outcome. But when Miriam shakes hands with Louis Darling and sees that he will die in 30 days, while calling her name, she realizes that fate might be choosing to involve her this time around.

I first became interested in "Blackbirds" because of its evocative cover, so beautifully done by Joey Hi-Fi, and I had the expectation that Miriam would have a dreamy way of looking at the world as one of those people who accepts their life with calm stoicism. But Miriam is anything but complacent and that fact is made clear right away as she springs to life, full of piss and vinegar, in all of her chain-smoking, swearing glory.

Miriam is a reflection of the world she inhabits. Any casual contact with another person brings visions of death that can be as benign as a heart attack or as graphic as a gunshot to the head.
Read more ›
Comment 42 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
I stumbled across Chuck's blog about six months ago. He's funny, profane, and irreverent. I enjoy reading his blog. I made a note to myself to read one of his books when I got a chance, but it took me awhile because my "to-read" list is daunting. I finally got around to reading it recently, and though I wanted to like it, it was, in the end, one of those books I had to force myself to finish. I thought a great deal about whether or not to write a review at all, as I read a blog post from Chuck about reviews, the gist of which was: If you don't have something nice to say, then keep your mouth shut. Although I don't write many reviews, I read a lot of books--hundreds every year. I write a review when I think I have something to say that is not a rehash of what other people have to say. Chuck's a funny guy, and he's built a good brand. He's a heck of a marketeer, and I admire what he's done. Unfortunately, he's not a particularly good writer. He's part of a clique of writers and wanna-be-writers that spend as much time as they can afford polishing each other's knobs in a kind of "mutual admiration society" aimed at reinforcing their brands and, of course, selling books. At that, Chuck is great. But after finishing this book, it made me disappointed with how social media and personal branding has become more important to writing than actually writing itself. This book is lame in every way: hackneyed story, ridiculous premise, full of typos, abysmal example of the writer's craft, gratuitous foul language (I like Chuck's foul language in his blogs, but much of it was just silly in the book, and the "narrator" (Chuck) wasn't distinguished from the main character. Perhaps if he'd chosen first person, he might have pulled it off), shallow and undeveloped characters, almost plotless.Read more ›
2 Comments 49 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews