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Blood Noir (Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter, Book 16) Hardcover – Bargain Price, May 27, 2008

2.7 out of 5 stars 496 customer reviews

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The Underground Railroad
The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent tour de force chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The florid 16th Anita Blake novel (after 2007's The Harlequin) updates Anita's endlessly erotic adventures as a living vampire with many weird lovers. Anita serves her vampire sweetie Jean-Claude, Master of the City of St. Louis, obsessed with feeding him and her own need to leech off of others' sexual pleasure or ardeur while retaining her rep as vampire executioner (despite the seeming conflict of interest), U.S. marshal and necromancer. She's also accompanying her bed-buddy Jason Schuyler to visit his dying estranged father in North Carolina. After arriving, Jason's mistaken for his rich cousin Keith Summerland, who's ditched his bride-to-be to run off with the wife of a vampire Master, giving Anita a case to solve between wild orgies with wereanimals. Hamilton chronicles Anita's escapades with a growing air of ennui, which longtime readers can't help sharing as sex increasingly takes the place of plot and character development. (June)
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Review

Death and gore galore ... Hamilton writes with ease and vigour ... Great fun SHIVERS I was enthralled - a departure from the usual type of vampire tale which will have a wide appeal to any reader hunting for both chills and fun Andre Norton The fights are fast and furious, with guns roaring, claws rending and wisecracks by the dozen. OUTLAND --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley Hardcover; 1 edition (May 27, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425222195
  • ASIN: B003B3NW44
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.2 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (496 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,576,008 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 27, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Imagine the horribly malformed love-child of "Days Of Our Lives," Anne Rice and some really bad Mary Sue fan fiction.

That is the most accurate description I can think of for "Blood Noir," the fifteenth novel in the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series. Since it's a rather lame little novella pumped up to novel size, Laurell K. Hamilton spins up artificial drama and endless sexual angst that never really goes anywhere or does anything, but fills up plenty of pages. By the end, you'll be wondering what the point is.

Werewolf stripper Jason drops by Anita's house to whine that his estranged dad is dying, and he's broken up with his girlfriend because she wanted monogamy. Three guesses which is considered more traumatic -- monogamy or cancer.

So Anita comforts him the only way she knows how, and then agrees to pose as his girlfriend so he can prove to his dad that he isn't gay. Apparently his family is more worried about his sexuality than about his being a werewolf. But when they arrive, Anita finds that Jason is one of several look-alike men in his hometown, and one of them is a wealthy engaged stud who is having an affair with the wife of a local Master vampire. This, needless to say, stokes up lots of bad feelings.

It also causes a few personal crises, as Anita finds out that weird tabloid rumors in St. Louis are jeopardizing Jean-Claude's position, and local vampires are gunning for Jason because he looks just like his cousin. Unfortunately this is only the start of her problems, since the ancient vampire matriarch Mother of All Darkness is waking up -- or I should say, STILL waking up after several books -- and causing yet more trouble for Anita.

For your information, "Blood Noir" was originally a novella.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is terrible. I mean, truly terrible. It's unoriginal at best, a waste of paper at its most truthful. I may have some spoilers in here, so be warned.

In this particular offering, Anita's "friend" Jason needs her to pose as his girlfriend to visit his dying father so that his "ultra-conservative, white-bread" family won't continue to think that Jason is gay. Jason gets kidnapped due to a sadly predictable plot twist and big bad Anita saves the day. If it sounds like a poorly written soap opera, it gets worse. I won't spoil it for you. In sum, "Noir" is more of the same drivel I've come to expect from Hamilton. Yes, there is less sex. Not much less, though, and the sex hasn't been replaced with plot. Scenes are stretched to their breaking point and beyond, pointless conversations abound, and the sex is thrown in when there is a lull in plot progression. There is very little action. I've been told that this novel was a novella first, and that does explain some of its problems, but certainly not all. This book has the same problems that all but the first 4 Anita books have. Characters are unbelievable, unoriginal, and for the most part, two-dimensional. Anita herself utterly destroys any suspension of disbelief that Hamilton can muster. Anita is a pure example of "Mary Sue-ism" or "Snappy Sue-ism". For an explanation of what I mean, go to [...] and [...]. Anyone who has read any of Hamilton's books will find these articles to ring sadly true for Anita.
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17 Comments 227 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Hardcover
I used to say that I was disappointed at the turn of the Anita Blake series, but no longer. Now it's time to say goodbye.

I had hoped that with The Harelquin, the sexual revolution that had overthrown what had been a fantastic character and series was coming to an end. I was mistaken. I've been forcing myself to continue to buy this series, but when it's over, it's over.

This book has no plot, no believable dialogue, nor anything of interest. All of its flaws have been outlined well by other reviewers, so I will only add that I would recommend to readers new to the series to begin with book one and end at book eight.

Originally, Anita was a powerhouse character. She had standards and aquired power as the books progressed. I very much enjoyed the developing coldness of Anita, particularly her pragmatic decision to torture someone to get information about Richard's kidnapped family.

Anita still defines herself as a vampire executioner and necromancer. When was the last time she actually executed a vampire? Killing them with "love" doesn't count. What happened to the blood and guts of this series? As for being a necromancer, I couldn't point to the last book in which she raised the dead. Isn't that supposed to be how she earns a living? Did she win the lottery somewhere in the series and I missed it? Every now and then she says something about "my job" or "my boss" and it throws me every time.

Perhaps Ms. Hamilton should consult a necromancer herself in an effort to resurrect her skill as a coherent and exciting story teller.

Ultimately the responsibility for the incredible decline of this series - and of the author's writing - rests solely with the editor and publishing house.
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