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The Blood Never Dried: A People's History of the British Empire Paperback – 2000

4.6 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Bookmarks Publications (2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905192126
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905192120
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 2.2 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,018,989 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By M. A. Krul on April 4, 2012
Format: Paperback
The "People's History" series has a well-deserved reputation, even if it is not a coordinated undertaking by any particular publisher. This book does not diminish that reputation. "The Blood Never Dried" is a people's history of the British Empire, and as such is an overdue critical, systematic examination of the litany of crimes, murders, and exploitations of all parts of the world undertaken under the banner of the Union Jack. At the risk of repeating other reviewers, the book examines in order: (1) Jamaica and slavery, (2) the Irish famine, (3) the Opium Wars and Taiping Rebellion (though not the Boxers), (4) the Sepoy Rebellion, (5) the colonization of Egypt, (6) WWI, (7) the settling and revolt of interwar Palestine, (8) Indian independence, (9) the Suez Crisis, (10) the Mau-Mau Rebellion, (11) the suppression of the revolt in Malaya, and (12) Britains relationship with American imperialism. In all of these cases, the author John Newsinger portrays without bloodlust but with great gravity and seriousness the enormities and crimes committed by and through imperialism, from widespread famines to systematic torture, murder, and repression. As Newsinger makes clear by this comparative process, there is no imperialism, whether 19th or 21st century, that can do without these elements: it was ever thus.

In each case too the author makes clear how the peoples of the colonized and imperialized countries rebelled against and resisted imperialism.
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Format: Paperback
John Newsingers "The Blood Never Dried" might be subtitled as a "Peoples History of the British Empire" but it is nothing of the sort. What the reader will instead find is a fine piece of writing that rather than providing a linear history of the Empire, examines a number of historical episodes that starkly illuminate what under girded the Empires existence: brutality and violence.

The selection is from what is known as the second British Empire, that which existed after the loss of the American colonies during the late eighteenth century. The episodes examined are (1) Jamaica and Slavery, (2) The Irish Famine, (3) The Opium Wars in China, (4) The 1857-58 Rebellion (Mutiny) in India, (5) The Invasion of Egypt in 1882, (6) The Imperial Crisis subsequent to WW1, (7) The Palestine Revolt of the late 1930's, (8) The campaign for Indian Independence, (9) The Suez War, (10) Kenya and the Mau-Mau Insurrection, (11) Malaya's "Emergency", and (12) Britains relationship with American Imperialism.

Each chapter focussing on one of the subjects (as listed above) and also put the events described into a broader historical context, including many quotes from contemporary participants and observers. It also reminds the reader that what a vicious racist Churchill could be, not least in relation to Iraq (where he spoke up for gassing recalcitrant tribes) and India (where even his viceroy in India was appalled at his callous response to the Bengal Famine that cost millions of Indian lives). Those who have fond memories of Old Labour will be disturbed to discover that one area of continuity between New and Old is foreign policy. Ernest Bevin, Herbert Morrison and even Clement Atlee were quite as capable of carrying out brutal imperial policies as their Conservative opponents.
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Most histories of the British Empire are the Dr. Jekyll version. Newslinger gives us the Mr. Hyde version. It is "real history" as Englishman David Irving might say. It is no exaggeration to compare English imperialism with Soviet Communism. Both were an outrage against humanity. Capitalist bastards and Communist ones operate under different ideologies but achieve similar results.
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Format: Paperback
John Newswinger decodes Anglophile rhetoric which glorifies the true costs of British Imperilialism.......

> "Giving independence to India" was the result of a long anti-colonial struggle. After WWII the British could not maintain control. PR spin would like the world to beleive all was done on British terms i.e.,coaching Indians to "govern themselves".

> Until the late 50's, Struggles ensued between the British & US over control of colonial possessions. Attempts were made to develop nuclear weapons independent from US technology. The Brits gave the program up & allied thmesleves with the USA. Often mainstream british/american Historians depict the struggle as a Cold War Struggle USA V USSR e.g., Nasser was intitially supported by the CIA to depose British puppet King Farouk.

Newswinder sites several case studies of British rule,including Ireland, Middle East, the Carribean & Africa

Very interesting read. I highly recommend this book. Lessons could be learned for the future of Pax Americana as well. If history tells us anything Empires always fall & create an unstable environment with violence & instability.
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