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Blues Masters 11: Classic Blues Women

4.6 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Audio CD, August 17, 1993
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Editorial Reviews

Blues Masters 11: Classic Blues Women

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Crazy Blues - Mamie Smith and Her Jazz Hounds
  2. Papa De Da Da - Clarence Williams Blue Five/Eva Taylor
  3. My Man Rocks Me (With One Steady Roll) - Trixie Smith/The Jazz Masters
  4. Railroad Blues - Trixie Smith
  5. Yonder Come The Blues - Ma Rainey And Her Georgia Band
  6. Countin' The Blues - Ma Rainey And Her Georgia Band
  7. Daddy, Goodbye Blues - Ma Rainey
  8. Baby, I Can't Use You No More - Ma Rainey And Her Georgia Band
  9. Bone Orchard Blues - Ida Cox
  10. Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out - Bessie Smith
  11. Barrel House Flat Blues - Mary Johnson
  12. When A Gator Hollers, Folks Say It's A Sign... - Margaret Johnson/The Black And Blue Trio
  13. Any-Kind-A-Man - Victoria Spivey And Her Chicago Four
  14. You Can't Tell The Difference After Dark - Alberta Hunter
  15. Little Drops Of Water - Henry Brown/Edith Johnson
  16. Married Man Blues - Billie And Dee Dee Pierce
  17. Careless Love - Billie And Dee Dee Pierce
  18. Stormy Blues - Billie Holiday


Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 17, 1993)
  • Original Release Date: August 17, 1993
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Rhino
  • ASIN: B0000032XP
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #197,973 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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By Sasha VINE VOICE on February 16, 2001
Format: Audio CD
A perfect introduction to now-forgotten period of music,when women were the first blues stars,this CD is also great company for a book "Black Pearls:Blues Queens of the 1920's" by Daphne Duvall Harrison.While in the book we could find historical and economical background that shaped women like Bessie Smith,Ma Rainey and Ida Cox,on this CD we can hear their voices - through the limitations of primitive recording equipment,spirit of Mamie Smith explodes in our ears from 1920.when her hit "Crazy Blues" started avalanche of blues recordings and opened a door for a new market,as then unknown teritory of "race music" whose first pioneers were women.It's interesting to compare this women to their white sisters from the same era (check "Flappers,Vamps And Sweet Young Things") - while white singers lived and performed in far better circumstances,their songs and type of singing sounds comical today as opposite to these wonderful black singers whose music left beautiful afterglow that still shines,a century later.Of course,at that time they did not know that today we will considered them artists,they were "loose women" condemned by church,often on the road,living hard life and paying their fame with a price of not having family.Popularity of this first blues singers lasted only 10 years and then they were washed away by depression which succesfully destroyed recording bussines for some time,but songs survived until present day - check wonderful Ma Rainey (whose importance as "the mother of the blues" is introduced here by 3 songs!) and Bessie Smith;compare them to other singers and hear for yourself why these two women are called "Mother" and "Empress",why their music overshadowed other contemporaries...Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
I swear, I swear on a stack of seven bibles, I am off, finally off film noir femme fatales after watching (or rather , re-watching) Robert Mitchum and Jane Greer, mainly Jane Greer, go round and round in the classic crime noir Out Of The Past. How could any rational man not think twice about following such femmes as Jane Greer's Kathy who just happened to be a little gun happy (and a chronic liar to boot) who put a couple in Robert Mitchum's Jeff after he did somersaults to try to save her bacon about six times. That's gratitude for you.

Well, like I said I am off, done, finished with those two-timing dames, and good riddance. Now I have time, plenty of time, and my health to speak of blues in the night wailing female torch singers who, as far as I know, do not carry or do not need to carry guns, to do their business. Of course it was not big deal to change my allegiances because since I was a kid I have been nothing but putty in their hands for any torch singer who could throw away my blues with some sorrow laden tune.

Maybe it was in some back-drop Harvard Square coffeehouse in long mist time 1960s when I first heard such voices, first among them, Billie Holiday, late, early, whatever Billie Holiday singing of some man on her mind, mostly some no good man, some no dough man, who maybe took a couple of whacks at her for no reason, or just took her last dough to bet on that next sure thing...and happiness. Or maybe earlier when some home background 1940s we won the war be-bop music filtered through the air our own childhood house from the local radio station playing Peggy Lee all Benny Goodman'd up, or Helen Whiting, or, or well, you get the drift. Stuff that would stop me in my tracks and ask, ask where did that sorrow come from.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a great CD. "You Can't Tell the Difference After Dark" is the highlight number by Alberta Hunter. Its hilarious and horribly inappropriate all at the same time. Highly recommend. One of my favorites of lady blues singers.
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By Ige Gustavson on October 11, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
great album of great singers from a great series. anyone even remotely interested in the blues should purchase these discs. they do not disappoint. the genres also do a decent job of lumping together styles.
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GREAT!
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