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Showing 1-9 of 9 reviews(1 star, Verified Purchases). See all 245 reviews
on September 22, 2017
Not what I expected. Too much historical background. I thought it would focus more on what defines bobos today.
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on July 14, 2001
Brooks is a somewhat funny writer, but his idea of accurate social analysis is to report on the NY Times wedding section. Nearly everything else in this book is anecdotal with only a few suspicious and contrived statistics thrown in gratuitously. He portrays an emerging social type called a "Bobo." The Bobo is characterized in numberous ways in too many chapters. Bobos are like this and Bobos are like that, etc.,etc..In my opinion, he fails to establish that anyone is an actual Bobo according to his definition. His mythical Bobo is a lot like the Frankenstein monster--parts of a lot of people, but nobody in particular.
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on December 10, 2014
Seriously, there were some tidbits of insight but I honestly had to force myself to read this book for a recent book club selection. I really like David Brooks and often find his comments interesting on NPR and in the NYT but this book did not make me want to buy another of his books. That being said, I will give one of his books a chance in another year or two...
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on October 13, 2016
It is more appropriate as a sociology book in college.
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on August 26, 2013
Didn't mention water damage. It's completely hard and has water stains. I think it only delivered on time because it had amazon prime.
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VINE VOICEon September 13, 2004
This book comes across as more of a jumping-on-the-bandwagon book than a carefully (or even uncarefully) researched sociological study. The author's main contention is that the upper class in America has shifted from being comprised of people with a lot of wealth to people with a lot of education. He points out that the rich in the past weren't typically top achievers, even if they did manage to graduate from Harvard, but now the top achievers seem to be well-to-do. There's a missing logical connection there that's never explicitly filled in. Likewise, he approaches the justification for his term "Bobo" for "bourgeois bohemian" from several directions but never quite completes the task. But that's all in the beginning of the book where he appears to be on track to somewhere. In later chapters his description of "Bobohood" becomes rather inconsistent. One minute a Bobo is a green hyper-consumer, the next a self-promoting talkshow pseudo-intellectual. I just don't see the connection between all those people driving SUVs, furnishing their houses from Crate and Barrel, and spreading their artisan bread with extra-virgin olive oil with the overbearing interviewees peddling their latest books on Good Morning America. I don't think the ordinary espresso drinkers that make up the core of Brooks' new class all have pretensions of doing talkshows- -after all, many of them are too busy throwing away their televisions. A few tastes of this book are amusing, but as a whole, it's a bunch of long-winded ideas for essays that have been over-stretched to make a monograph. If you want to know who the real upper class in America are, you're better off reading The Millionaire Next Door, whose findings are actually based on real statistical data.
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on June 25, 2008
This book is absolutely horrible. Aside from an almost interesting brief history of bohemia (which was sketchy and obviously tailored to the conclusions the author wished to reach, much like the rest of the book) he simply goes into lauding a caricature of rich professionals and somehow equates that with previous bohemian movements - the equation seeming to be that reading Walden makes you a woodsman, and admiring the Beat Generation in college is the same thing as purposefully leading a life outside of consumer culture. He's trying to sell consumption as art, and doing a rather bad job of even that.

This book, supposedly of a sociological topic, contains absolutely no hard data. Basically it's a way for Brooks to convince himself that he and those around him can buy coolness and authenticity, hundreds of pages to defend replacing artists with lawyers and pretending there's no difference.

If you want something decent about counterculture trends go read either Naomi Klien or Nation of Rebels. If you want something about city trends try American Demographics or maybe Generations. But under no circumstances should you buy this book.
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on August 26, 2014
Sorry, but I thought it was boring and didn't read it all.
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on December 13, 2016
We quickly gave away this book to a library.
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