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Bodies in Revolt: A Primer in Somatic Thinking 2nd Edition

3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0918236036
ISBN-10: 0918236037
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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Freeperson Pr; 2nd edition (June 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0918236037
  • ISBN-13: 978-0918236036
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #856,830 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A classical work in the somatics field. I don't agree with everything Hanna asserts by any means, but his passion and lucidity make for a quick and compelling read. At times the book comes off as brash, over-the-top, even hostile and arrogant - but this is balanced by a unique and wholly enthusiastic vision of what humanity can and should become. Also, the philosophical breadth of the work is impressive - he ties his notion of "somatics" into some of the great philosophical traditions of the last few centuries. Agree or disagree with his positions, it's a great book and an excellent jumping off point for further discussions in the field of somatic studies. Highly recommended!!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm not interested in most of Thomas Hanna's books. But this is a clear exception. It is one of those books that through reference to many of the great thinkers, can cause a young adult to question one's view of the world and have the realization that a lot of the important questions of life have been addressed by some brilliant men. This book shook me up in a positive way when I read it at 17. (John Fowles wrote a similar book of aphorisms titled "The Aristos."The Aristos I purchased this copy for my son.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had high expectations for this book but have major buyer's remorse. The writing is new-agish, pop psychology and philosophy for dummies in style and content. I think some people should stick to writing up case studies and leave theory to others. Hanna seems to have been one of them.

Hanna's approach is general and impressionistic and he makes statements that should raise eyebrows, such as that Kant is a somatic thinker (apparently), and that that Merleau-Ponty is mainly concerned with consciousness. If you read the Phenomenology of Perception, Merleau-Ponty says that Kant is concerned with consciousness and is therefore not a somatic thinker but an intellectualist, whereas Merleau-Ponty himself is a somatic thinker precisely to the extent that he is concerned with the body and therefore not with consciousness, if in all these expressions 'consciousness' is understood as meaning 'conceptual thought'.

Since there isn't much detail it is hard to say what he means. You get only a vague impression of what he understands by 'the soma' or 'somatic thinking', which seems to be something like 'the organism'. You might get some general sense of who Darwin, Konrad Lorenz, Piaget, Reich, etc. were if you did not already know.

Perhaps the most informative chapter is on Reich. While Hanna ignores Reich's politics, his description here comes closest to identifying what he means by the 'soma', and anticipates his later development. It shows how far Hanna's own thinking is influenced by Reich. Later on he is critical of Reichian therapy, but here it is clearer that in fact Reich is a source for him, in particular, the idea of expansion and contraction which he develops in "The Body of Life".
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