The Bonobo and the Atheist: In Search of Humanism Among the Primates 1st Edition, Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 199 customer reviews
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ISBN-13: 978-0393347791
ISBN-10: 0393347796
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Editorial Reviews

Review

“Frans de Waal’s new book carries the important message that human kindness is a biological feature of our species and not something that has to be imposed on us by religious teaching.”
- Desmond Morris, author of The Naked Ape

“De Waal’s decades of patient work documenting the ‘building blocks’ of morality in other animals has revolutionized not just primatology but moral psychology. By revealing our commonalities with other species, he gives us more compassion for them and also for ourselves. It’s impossible to look an ape in the eye and not see oneself, de Waal tells us, and this beautifully written book is one long riveting gaze.”
- Jonathan Haidt, author of The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion

“Frans de Waal offers us a wealth of inspiring observations from the animal realm, combined with thoughtful reflections on the evolution of morality. He makes a convincing case for the natural foundations of a secular ethics that is fully independent of religion without being dogmatically against it.”
- Matthieu Ricard, Buddhist monk, scientist, and author of Happiness and The Quantum and the Lotus

“The perpetual challenge to atheists is that moral behavior requires religion―all that prevents tsunamis of depravity is a deity or two, some nice hymns, and the threat of hellfire and damnation. De Waal shows that human morality is deeply rooted in our primate legacy, long predating the invention of that cultural gizmo called religion. This is an immensely important book by one of our most distinguished thinkers.”
- Robert Sapolsky, author of Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers and Monkeyluv

“A well-composed argument for the biological foundations of human morality.”
- Kirkus Reviews

“This is a writer marshaling the evidence of his life, particularly his life as a scientist, to express a passionately held belief in the possibility of a more compassionate society.”
- Meehan Crist, New Republic

“A primatologist who has spent his career studying chimpanzees and bonobos, two of humanity’s closest living relatives, Mr. de Waal draws on a lifetime of empirical research. His data provides plenty of evidence that religion is not necessary in order for animals to display something that looks strikingly like human morality.”
- The Economist

About the Author

Frans de Waal has been named one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People. The author of Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?, among many other works, he is the C. H. Candler Professor in Emory University’s Psychology Department and director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. He lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

Product details

  • File Size: 11204 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (March 25, 2013)
  • Publication Date: March 18, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007Q6XKEY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #93,005 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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