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Book Publishing: A Basic Introduction Hardcover – August, 1989

3.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 260 pages
  • Publisher: Continuum Intl Pub Group; Expanded edition (August 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826404464
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826404466
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 6.3 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,280,505 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By frumiousb VINE VOICE on June 27, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
_Book Publishing: The Basic Introduction_ is exactly what it claims to be. Dessauer breaks his book into 7 major chapters: Publishing History, Creation of Books, Manufacture of Books, Marketing of Books, Storage and Delivery of Books, and Management Issues of Publishers.
He does a very good job of balancing the content, so that you feel as a reader that you get a reasonably comprehensive look at all the aspects of publishing, without going into too much depth. The book also provides an excellent glossary and well-constructed index.
The only trouble with the book is that some of the areas that (for me) were the most interesting (figures about the current book-buying population and habits, etc.) were also the ones that were most vulnerable to being out-of-date. While the book is in a new edition, the facts and figures still seem to date back to the late 1980s. It was a little bit frustrating when I didn't know how useful a particular interesting fact might be.
Recommended strongly for people who want to get a feel for the industry.
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Format: Paperback
To coincide with my career change, I decided it was time to understand a little bit more about the mechanics of my favorite industry. Dessauer is a former Director of the Center of Book Publishing at the University of Scranton, as well as a past contributing editor to Publishers Weekly, and this volume is likely the beginning textbook for anyone who wants to make publishing a career. After a summary history of the evolution of publishing, Dessauer delves right into the meat of the subject (to mangle a metaphor), covering how books are created, how they are manufactured, and how they are sold. Creation, although most wannabes and some authors think begins and ends with their personal word processor, was an intriguing chapter, as it covers the acquisition process for both a major house and an independent publisher, as well as bringing in the artwork, how the book is "set," and designed. The marketing of books, presented here in a coldly clinical light, when we all know that the truth is darkened santums filled with black-hooded figures mumbling over bubbling cauldrons, provides some humorous moments where Dessaur discusses how publishing lines have tiers of publications and marketeers with rarely a clue about their product. Although long a whipping post for authors and editors alike, one can feel somewhat sorry for the poor marketing folk, who graduated college where their education how to do with the positioning of a new cereal by Post or a sneaker by Reebox. They try so hard to treat a book as a similar commodity, and are constantly dumbfounded by the illogical market. (That's not to say that all marketers are this clueless, as I know some sales agents who actually do read--I also know how they have to separate their personal tastes from their sales lists as well.Read more ›
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By A Customer on June 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
If you want to pubish your book, this is a MUST! I got my travel-book published after reading this, and now feel like a respected member of the publishing team; the knowledge gleaned from this book allows you to keep in the loop--even when and where the publisher doesn't want you to be.
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Format: Paperback
Copyright is 1993 and the data in the tables is from mid to late 1980s. Back then, people wrote books on word processors and went to bookstores to buy books. Not anymore. Buy a modern book on the subject instead of this one.
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