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Boy vs. Girl Hardcover – March 1, 2011

4.2 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Fish in a Tree
Make This Summer A Classic
The uplifting and unforgettable New York Times bestselling, Schneider Award-winner that's perfect for fans of "Wonder." Hardcover | Kindle book | See more for ages 9-12
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Editorial Reviews

Review

Here's the thing that makes Boy Vs Girl such a stand-out: It's a coming of age story with a backdrop of faith that might be written for Muslim teens or might be written for me, a person of another faith who appreciates a good story. It works either way which is no small feat. The writing is clear and accessible even though it delves into complicated, but universal, issues. This means Robert's work will appeal to a braod age-range and demographic. therockpool.wordpress.com You can tell that the author has put so much of her heart into the novel and her characters. Their dialogue and language rings true, as does the way they act around eachother and towards their friends and family. This unexpected little book is a true gem and I hope it gets a wide audience. www.myfavouritebooks.blogspot.com Written in a light, non-patronising tone and using down-to-earth language, the twins' story, with their differences, similarities, problems and beliefs unfolds. The book is easy to follw with a snappy to-the-point plot, but makes many subtle points that hit home. Don't be fooled into thinking these are rose-tinted taoes about girls who can't match their headscarves to their henna; these books feature realistic characters dealing with issue relevant to youth - Muslim and non-Muslim - today. www.campusalam.org Gives an interesting insight into a culture that some readers might be quite unfamiliar with... And you probably won't see the ending coming... Armadillo Magazine This book confronts some challenging issues and offers a relevant read for anyone interested in the tensions which play themselves out within families and between cultures. School Librarian Very accessible for teens who want to understand more about Muslim culture, with a handy glossary of Asian and Arabic words and phrases at the back of the book. But the heart of the story s the unbreakable and close bond between brother and sister and how, despite their different journeys, they draw on their shared love and courage to do the right thing. Eastern Eye I found myself admiring and respecting the ambition of this novel, caught up in the characters and their journeys, caring how things turned out for them; and very much wanting to know what Muslim readers would make of it. Books for Keeps --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

NA'IMA B ROBERT is descended from Scottish Highlanders on her father's side and the Zulu people on her mother's side. She was born in Leeds, grew up in Zimbabwe and went to university in London. At high school, her loves included performing arts, public speaking and writing stories that shocked her teachers! She has written several multicultural books for children and is the author of 'From Somalia, with love', a novel for young adults. 'Boy vs Girl' is her second books for teens. She divides her time between London and Cairo and dreams of living on a farm with her own horses. Until then, she is happy to be a mum to her four children and keep reading and writing books that take her to a different world each time. To find out more about Na'ima B Robert click here --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 - 15 years
  • Grade Level: 6 - 10
  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Frances Lincoln Children's Books; Reprint edition (March 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847801501
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847801500
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,747,327 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I enjoyed reading this book, and I think it is very well written. Compared to other novels written for a Muslim audience, it far surpasses anything else. There is some content with drugs, and flirtations between the genders, but it is always clear what is right and wrong without it sounding like an after school special. I would recommend this, especially right before Ramadan as that is the setting of this book. Great conversation opener with your kids, too!
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Format: Hardcover
I received this book from the publisher and Teen Book Scene in exchange for a fair and honest review. I am in no way receiving any compensation for my review of this book.

I am somewhat familiar with Ramadan and some Pakistani customs. I'm also familiar with the fact that Pakistanis living in countries other than Muslim countries are faced with two different worlds- the one their parents were raised in that they are expected to follow with arranged marriages, no dating, drinking, smoking, or any other kind of imbibing and no partying of any kind, even if you don't do any of those things. Then there is the real world. The one they face every day at school with their non-Muslim friends where they talk about what they did over the weekend and the boys or girls they are dating and other things that "good" Muslims don't do. Here are a few phrases that describe what it is like at least for Farhana, " ...you are their daughter, a Pakistani girl, a Muslim. You are expected to stay chaste, away from all this teen romance nonsense." (p.65) And "...parties were out of the question, staying over at friends' houses was unthinkable." (p.65) Then, "...how crazy was that? All around her, the messages were the complete opposite. The music, the videos, the movies, the teen magazines, were all full of the same thing: boys, boys, boys! It was like if you weren't hooking up with some guy or the other, you were on of the last living freaks." (p. 65-66). In reading Boy vs. Girl, it gave me a better appreciation for what a difficult world it is for anyone that doesn't follow the normal societal code.

Faraz is a sensitive, shy, good looking possibly effeminate boy. He isnt gay. He just isn't sports minded like his father. He's artistic.
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Format: Hardcover
Description:
Farhana swallowed and reached for the hijab. But then she saw with absolute clarity the weird looks from the other girls at school, and the smirks from the guys. Did she dare? And then there was Malik... What should she do about him? Faraz was thinking about Skrooz and the lads. Soon he would finally have the respect of the other kids at school. But at what price? He heard Skrooz's voice, sharp as a switchblade: "This thing is powerful, blud. But you have to earn it, see? Just a few more errands for me..." They're twins, born 6 minutes apart. Both are in turmooil and both have life-changing choices to make, against the peaceful backdrop of Ramadan. Do Farhana and Faraz have enough courage to do the right thing? And can they help each other - or will one of them draw the other towards catastrophe? This powerful novel explores the idea of honour and what it means to different generations of Muslim families.

Review:
This book was something I normally would have not picked up but I'm glad I was able to read it. I was moved by the Muslim customs in this book and it allows you to put yourself in their position, regardless of your religious upbringing.
What struck me is the Muslim culture suffers from so much racism; even bringing their children up in different countries they are still expected to follow the Pakistani way, even if the opposite sex is Muslim and white, black, brown or whatever. They are not and will not be a part of their families. I felt myself shuttering when the families absolutely refused to hear anything otherwise.
The story of the book covers from a male and female perspective; twin boy (Faraz) and girl (Farhana). He wants to be accepted at school but at what cost? He has fallen into the `gang' crowd.
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