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The Boy who Lit up the Sky (The Two Moons of Rehnor Book 1) by [Ay, J. Naomi]
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The Boy who Lit up the Sky (The Two Moons of Rehnor Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 96 customer reviews

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Length: 290 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Naomi lives in the north Olympic Peninsula and is mom to 3 and a Pomeranian. She has always been a fan of historical fiction, fantasy and science fiction and is known for having waited in line for seven hours for the opening of both the original Star Wars and Star Trek films. 
Having been an accountant for more than twenty-five years, Naomi is now turning her attention full time to continuing The Two Moons of Rehnor series and the Time Tripping Adventure series as dreaming of fictional people is far more interesting than reconciling ledgers. 

Product Details

  • File Size: 1198 KB
  • Print Length: 290 pages
  • Publisher: Ayzenberg, Inc.; Update Jan 25, 2016 edition (January 6, 2014)
  • Publication Date: January 6, 2014
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007B77U8A
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,929 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
I received a copy of this book in exchange for my review through Goodreads' READ IT AND REAP program. I thank the author for this opportunity.

For me, this story was--odd. I'm not sure exactly why that word summarizes it best for me, but when I try to think of descriptive words for the story, it is the word that comes to mind again and again. I find I am confused by the world created between the covers of THE BOY WHO LIT UP THE SKY. The people and social norms suggest that the world is ancient and pre-industrial, but the gadgets and technologies are anything but. Thus, I pictured thirteenth century people in a twenty-first century world, and somehow, it did not work well for me. Things from just the first few pages that suggested an old included the orphan home and the way it was run, the power of the Father, the infants' loss of their parents during the "winter freeze," use of words such as "half-breed" and "milord," the "one year olds' room" where "twenty babies sat naked in chairs, eating, sleeping and pooping at will," the reference to orphan girls who "unless they were rescued before age seven or eight, would be put to work earning their keep," the fact that there were only jobs for "men who joined the guards and women who worked as maids in the Palace," the loss of babies from "a fever going around," the off-handed manner in which a child sexual predator was introduced, and so forth. I could picture these things in a world very different from the world of today. Even so, these same early pages occasionally noted things like a bottle warmer, the Father's new "speeder," old radiators that "spat and hissed," and a note that no busses serviced a particular area. I grant that a fantasy world can be anything.
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Format: Kindle Edition
A brilliant start to what is sure to be a 'Best Selling' series.

Our hero Senya's miserable start to life in an orphanage is difficult in the extreme. The writing is hard hitting in places but Senya's story gradually evolves through the eyes of each of the characters involved in his care.

Of mixed interplanetary parentage, Senya is misunderstood and abused for his differences, but his all encompassing persona and incredible, almost magical talents serve to save him as well as seclude him.

I loved the way this book reeled me in, even after having made me close the pages after some particularly hard moments in Senya's life.

I just couldn't put it down! This book is a worthy winner of a quarter final place in the ABNA finals.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
There aren't many books anymore that manage to suck me into them, so the mere fact that I wanted to finsih this and wanted the sequel speaks volumes.
I like the scene descriptions, the little bits of history given here and there, enough to make depth without getting sidetracked and boring.
I have to keep myself from thinking "but why doesn't he just..." or I will ruin the story. Don't worry so much about his motivations, just go with it.

My one big strike against this book is that here we had this great story about these two societies and then suddenly, out of the blue, the author brings earth into it.
WTF? WHY does there need to be a tie to earth? If another society is needed, why not something else? I really do not like the tendency of so many authors to feel like they must somehow tie Earth into their otherwise totally self contained worlds.

It is also an incredibly sexist book, reading that doesn' t bother me so much but I can think of a number of my friends who would not be able to read it because of that.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Ok, first I want to start with the negatives, simply because I like starting of that way so we can end on a happy note. I do like this book, but there is still so much I don't understand, I don't really understand how the two races (the Mishnese and Karupta) came to their planet, I don't understand why they've been fighting for a thousand years, and why in the world would a King allow his prince to act a fool. I mean come on real that sucker in. There is a lot that happens in this book, and maybe starting out the way I did wasn't the best way to begin this but, that really does bother me. With all that we come to know and all that we come to understand there are still so many questions. I guess that's why this is a series. This book follows Senya but never through Senya's voice, we follow all the people around him, and not always sequentially, which can be confusing. Each chapter is someone different, though not always a different voice. Sometimes we move forward and sometimes backward but the central focus is always Senya. I mean he is pretty magnificent, he is apparently great to look at and he has magical powers, and weird feet. I wouldn't say there is a lot of action in this book, there is some but mostly it's a lot of internal dialogue and interaction. We are getting to know a boy without ever getting in his head but we never really get to know him very well. He's ever-changing a dynamic, and quiet character. I think if you don't like wordy or character driven stories then you may not like this, but the author does a great job in helping us visualize this world. Overall the book is very entertaining and each voice we hear, is different and unique to that person. We span many years through this book and though it's not always fluid, it is still very entertaining. I just hope that subsequent books will help fill in some of the blanks.
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