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Brannigan

3.9 out of 5 stars 227 customer reviews

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$32.96 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details In stock on July 27, 2016. Order it now. Sold by Achilles' Reel and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Fortunately, John Wayne had two vastly more interesting feature films (Rooster Cogburn and The Shootist) left in him following this disposable, leaden 1975 fish-out-of-water story. Wayne phones in his performance as a Chicago cop, Jim Brannigan, whose hunt for a fugitive in London is mostly an excuse for cross-cultural conflicts and comedy. Richard Attenborough adds local color as a Scotland Yard detective who partners with the Duke, and Judy Geeson plays a lovely, liberated constable who won't brook Brannigan's ingrained sexism. The by-the-numbers script is more pacifying for diehard Wayne fans than exciting to everyone, and the film looks embarrassingly ornamental with its naked display of touristy backdrops. Still, Brannigan is a slick tribute to the staying power of an American icon. --Tom Keogh

Special Features

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Product Details

  • Actors: John Wayne, Richard Attenborough, Judy Geeson, Mel Ferrer, John Vernon
  • Directors: Douglas Hickox
  • Writers: Christopher Trumbo, Michael Butler, William P. McGivern, William W. Norton
  • Producers: Arthur Gardner, Jules V. Levy, Michael Wayne
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), Spanish (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    PG
    Parental Guidance Suggested
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: October 2, 2001
  • Run Time: 111 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (227 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005N89K
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,972 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Brannigan" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
From the time I saw Brannigan in the theaters as a kid, through a number of chances to watch it again over the years, it has been one of my favorite movies. I grew up with the crime dramas of the 1970s, had little patience for Westerns, and am sorry John Wayne had so little time left to make detective movies. His other police drama, McQ, was trying so hard to imitate other "gritty" characters and films, was so formulaic, artificial, confusing, dreary, stiff, heavy-handed, and cliché, that these elements crowded out Wayne. Not so Brannigan.

Wayne shined. He was natural and utterly comfortable and convincing in the role. He was likable, frank, good-natured, decent, down-to-earth, and tough -- "so damn solid," as Geeson's character put it (to which he replied, "Fat, you mean") in a nice, genuine scene where Brannigan talked about wanting to catch the hood responsible for killing his rookie partner because it was his duty to protect the kid even though, no matter how "nice a story" it would make if the kid had been like a son to him, he had not even liked the "smart-aleck" kid. Wayne had terrific, commanding screen presence. He looked as fit and acted as vigorous as called for by the role. Suggestions in other reviews that he was "too old" or "too fat" are nonsense. The mature cast is a pleasant contrast to today's rampant superficiality.

All of the supporting actors -- Attenborough, Geeson, Ferrer, Vernon, Pilon -- were real professionals who similarly brought substance to their roles and played them smoothly and effectively. The characters were nicely sketched.
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Format: VHS Tape
Good movie overall. There something to be said about these gritty '70's cop films, with the grainy look, dated scores, and often hard to follow dialogue and story lines. John Wayne jumped into this "dirty harry" genre with this and McQ, with marginal success. Wayne is nearing 70 by this time, and in many ways looks it. He brings charm and style to any role he graces, but looks surpirsingly tired and worn out here. Perhaps his declining health had something to do with it, promting questions as to why he kept on working when so many others of his era had retired. He should have retired with True Grit, although his brave performance in The Shootist was a fitting swan song to the career of the finest actor America ever produced. There will never be another John Wayne.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Like McQ, John Wayne plays a police detective in this film. He is his trademark, tough as nails, no nonsense, "I'll do it my way" kind of character but there is a difference. This one is more enjoyable.

He plays a cop from Chicago. His arch nemesis is a mobster and is just about to be brought down when he flees the country to London. Wayne is sent there to bring him back under an extradition treaty. Problems arise when Wayne is just about to get his prisoner from Scotland Yard and the prisoner is kidnapped. That leaves the Chicago PD and Scotland Yard both with egg on their face. Both want the prisoner back but they have very different styles of getting the job done.

Scotland Yard tends to be very civil about such things. They don't even like having John Wayne around let alone his revolver. Wayne prefers the direct approach. Find a bad guy and MAKE him talk. Eventually, it is a blend of both styles that brings the perp to justice but there are plenty of twists and turns along the way. The kidnapper lead the police on several wild goose chases and they are not who they appear to be.

The only one who can be taken at face value is John Wayne's character. He says what he means and backs it up with bullets or a swift punch. Judy Geeson makes for a sweet sidekick for him along the way.

The Wayne character is a constant. Thankfully, it is constantly enjoyable.
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Format: DVD
I recently watched the reruns of two action movies, McQ & Brannigan, both starring John Wayne, on cable TV. I had watched both of them in the theatres during the mid 70's or so.

As a young boy, I have always enjoyed watching John Wayne in so many westerns (Stage-coach, Rio Bravo, True Grit...) & in so many war movies (Green Berets, Sands of Iwo Jima, The Longest Day...).

I believe that John Wayne was almost in his late 60's/early 70's when he starred in the above two movies. I also believe that these were the only two movies in which he had played a street-wise no-nonsense cop. That's 'Dirty Harry' style!

In the first movie, McQ, he was Police Detective-Lieutenant Lon McQ in Seattle. He investigated the death of his partner & along the way uncovered some corrupt elements in his police department with shady connections to the mob. The signature mobster in the movie, Manny Santiago, was played by Al Lettieri.

In the second movie, Brannigan, he was Police Detective-Lieutenant Jim Brannigan in Chicago. He was sent to London to bring back an American mobster on the run, Ben Larkin, (played by John Vernon) & along the way he got entangled with the conservative work-style of Scotland Yard.

Despite his age, John Wayne was really remarkable in both roles. Having seen him in so many westerns & war movies, it was refreshing to see him acting in contemporary settings. The hot-pursuit action sequences (car chases & shoot-outs) were really good, considering that era. In McQ, the car chase along the beach, with sea gulls fluttering away for cover, was magnificantly choreographed. In Brannigan, the car chase segment ending at the Tower Bridge was great, too. There was even a large-scale brawl at a London pub...reminiscent of John Wayne's innumerable westerns.
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