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Brass Man (Agent Cormac) by [Asher, Neal]
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Brass Man (Agent Cormac) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 39 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A satisfyingly baroque plot and strong action sequences make up for a lack of character development and moral complexity in this gory space opera from British SF author Asher. Human beings have considerable freedom in Polity Space, a mostly civilized place, but enormously powerful AIs make all the important decisions. Three monstrous creatures threaten the Polity: Dragon, a gigantic being of unknown origin; Skellor, an evil, once human scientist transformed by the nanotechnology of the extinct Jain race; and Mr. Crane, the monstrous killing machine who does Skellor's bidding. Aided by several AIs, supercompetent Earth Central Security agent Ian Cormac must deal with all these dangers before civilization is plunged into chaos. Unbeknownst to him, however, several powerful AIs are plotting to gain Jain technology, even if it means the destruction of the human race. This violent, fast-moving novel is lots of fun, but makes no concessions to readers unfamiliar with Gridlinked and Line of Polity, the earlier books in the series. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Asher's latest foray into the Polity universe--a far-future world ruled by AIs and connected by runcible technology, which allows faster-than-light travel and communication--is a hunt for Dragon, an entity abandoned by a previous civilization. Ian Cormac wants Dragon to get to Skellor, a particularly nasty kind of killer. Skellor is looking for Dragon to answer questions about Jain technology, left behind by another, long-vanished civilization. Skellor has resurrected the mysterious Mr. Crane, who has been given the personality of a serial killer but has become schizophrenic to give himself a chance of regaining his own mind. Foremost at issue is the Jain technology, used by Skellor to take over ships and human minds alike. Some believe it can be put to positive ends; others, that it's far too dangerous. No one understands what it really does or precisely how it works. All paths cross on an out-of-the-way planet on which the fight over Jain technology will finally erupt. Asher's way with space opera makes this hunt across space a spectacular adventure. Regina Schroeder
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Product Details

  • File Size: 1252 KB
  • Print Length: 505 pages
  • Publisher: Tor; Reprints edition (August 21, 2009)
  • Publication Date: August 21, 2009
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003DWC6P4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #153,365 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Robert Sternberg on October 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
If you were stunned by "Gridlinked," and left awe-struck by "The Line of Polity," then I guarantee you won't be disappointed with "Brass Man." Picking up almost immediately after the end of Line, it continues the saga of ECS agent Ian Cormac, and weaves narratives for many characters introduced in the previous two novels - plus several fascinating new ones - into an extremely satisfying whole. Best of all, it brings back one of the most unique and enigmatic of all of Asher's creations - the flawed yet noble Golem Twenty-Five, Mr. Crane.
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Format: Hardcover
This is the 3rd of the Polity series by Neal Asher. In this volume, Neal Asher delves deeper into the role of AI's in his universe. It quite enjoyabley follows the adventures of agent Cormac as he again must track down Skellor and the curse that is the Jain.

By the way, do not be discouraged by the lone seller here selling the title for way too much. You can buy the book from Amazon.co.uk for far less. Asher is a british author and quite a few of his books are difficult to find stateside. A quick electronic look across the pond will offer better results.
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Format: Hardcover
This book is cracking. Just like the Skinner I thoroughly enjoyed it. Took 3 days to read and that was only because of work food and sleep breaks!

Dragon, and Ian Cormac are back... and this makes for some real fun. There's big, bigger, and biggest nasties roaming around, a good splattering (and i use that word with a chuckle) of violent death, a decent amount of sci fi, and a damn good story to boot.

The last book I read of his was Cowl and it didn't feel quite like Neal was enjoying himself writing it. This one is different. Mind... if i wrote stuff like this.. i'd enjoy it too.

One small note, if your a first time Asher buyer, i'd suggest picking up Line of Polity first. Its not absolutely needed, but it'd certainly give you a good grounding!
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Format: Hardcover
Brass Man, the latest book in Neal Asher's Polity series develops into a rip-roaring action-filled dynamo of an SF novel once you get past the initial flashback sequences. There's plenty here to excite - epic space battles, virulent alien nanotechnology, evil baddies and ever larger and more hideous monsters! The flashbacks near the start can be somewhat confusing, also there is not an awful amount of character development, especially since this is now our third encounter with many of these people. Still, the inventive and fast-paced action sequences do more than enough to compensate for these flaws. I loved it!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Best book in the Agent Cormac series, meaning best for Asher period except for the Spatterjay books. Everything you love about Neal Asher's Polity books taken to their extreme. These are the only books I have ever reread except for the Hobbit/LOTR and the Discworld books.
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Format: Paperback
I'm now on Polity Agent, having read the first three books in the Ian Cormac series. Brass Man is the third (of four) books in the series, and another excellent addition. Reviving Mr Crane, the psychotic Golem from Gridlinked, Asher pits bad guys with nano-infused, alien technology against our series heroes in the usual hostile environment of leviathan monsters and AI-led ships racing through u-space overhead. Enjoyable for its dense plotting, imaginative flora & fauna, and action. I've mentally screened it as the last Bond melded with the first Star Wars, throttled up to Tarantino ultraviolence levels.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Neal Asher's BRASS MAN, the third novel in his Ian Cormac series and the fourth (I think) set in his Polity universe, is a distinct improvement over its predecessor, the overly-long and underly-stimulating THE LINE OF POLITY. Most of the events in BRASS MAN take place a year or two after the conclusion of LINE and a few more years after the conclusion of GRIDLINKED. Evil mad scientist Skellor, who had been thought dead, reappears, hijacks a spaceship, and decides for no particularly good reason to resurrect the psychotic metal-skinned android Mr. Crane, who had been destroyed at the end of GRIDLINKED. After bringing Mr. Crane under his control, Skellor uses him to help wreak havoc here, there, and everywhere. As Skellor's journey unfolds, we also learn through flashbacks about how Mr. Crane's crystalline mind was maliciously warped, how Mr. Crane has resisted his psychosis and his masters over the years, and how Mr. Crane might someday be able to heal himself. By the end of the book, we know more about Mr. Crane than we do about Ian Cormac, although that's not saying a lot.

Skellor's flight from Polity authorities eventually takes him and Mr. Crane to a colony world that lost contact with Earth hundreds of years in the past. We learn about this world primarily through the adventures of Rondure Knight Anderson and his not-entirely-trustworthy sidekick Tergal as they explore the desert wastes on their sand hog mounts. Anderson and Tergal are not exactly Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, but there are some echoes here of that storied duo. The final battles of BRASS MAN are fought on and around their world, and you can be sure that they play a role.

Two important narrative threads emerge in BRASS MAN and are bound to be followed in later novels.
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