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Brave Men Run - A Novel of the Sovereign Era Paperback – June 13, 2008

4.7 out of 5 stars 70 customer reviews
Book 1 of 3 in the Sovereign Era Series

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Matthew Wayne Selznick is an author and creator living in Long Beach, California. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Swarm Press (June 13, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 193486109X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1934861097
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,684,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been listening to the podiobook of this book (available at [...]) and it has completely captivated myself, my wife, my 11 year old daughter and my 14 year old son. Told as a revealing and personal narrative, the story is dramatic, well paced, intriguing and very accessible. It's also a great blast from the past for those of us who were in high school and/or college in the fabulous 80s! Warning: Some of the content is probably more suggestive than a pre-teen should be exposed to, but it is relatively brief and easily by-passed for younger consumption.
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Format: Paperback
You don't see many examples of "super-hero" stories in novel form (unless you are speaking of graphic novels, of course). But 'Brave Men Run' begins its existence in a non-graphic form, both written and as an audiobook (actually, the better term is podiobook in this case). I could definitely see 'Brave Men Run' as a graphic novel, but for now I am very happy to have experienced it in its current form.

As with most good novels, when you peel back the layers of 'Brave Men Run' you find more depth. On the surface it is a coming of age novel. The main character endures high-school during an alternate-Earth Reagan era. He falls in love and is transformed by the events that take place around him.

'Brave Men Run' is also an origin story, in comic-book terms. It introduces what character William Donner calls 'The Sovereign,' similar to the 'mutants' of X-Men stories. The twist here is that the story is told through the eyes of main character Nate Charters, a boy with definite differences that has no idea if he is one of these 'Sovereign.' that have announced themselves to the world.

The tone of the story is that of an outsider seeking normalcy in an 80s world. But if being a misfit in high school wasn't enough, this 'Sovereign Declaration' produces a new form of alienation for Nate Charters.

'Brave Men Run' has been called "The Breakfast Club meets the X-Men", and "Spiderman as directed by John Hughes." The 80s feel is realistic across the board, and the voice the author gives to Nate Charters (especially in the podiobook) is on the mark. Children of the 80s will enjoy the references, comic book readers will enjoy the references to the 'silver age' of comics, and the story is enjoyable to boot.
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Format: Paperback
Brave Men Run is a rare find in books today. The story of Nathan Charters is very easy to relate to and just flat out fun to read. The story is of Nathan Charters, who was born a bit different. He's got some special gifts and finds they also have a knack for getting him into trouble. The story is a coming of age story of friends, first loves and responsiblity. Brave Men Run takes place in the 80's where Nate is attending High School where being different is a curse. Nate has to learn to live with who he is before he can live up to his potential. If you like character driven stories, you'll love this book. If you like comics, you'll like this book. If you are a fan of the 80's, you'll probably like this book. Buy the book and tell your friends about it!
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Format: Paperback
Brave Men Run brought me right back to my time in high school. It brought back all the memories of what was good in the 80's colored by an amazing super-hero story. Matt Selznick's writing takes this story above so many others in the genre. He made me really care about the characters and what happened to them. His dialog is flow effortlessly and his plot had more than enough twists to keep me guessing at what would happen next.

Matt Selznick is in the top ten of the new genre writers this year and Brave Men Run is a book you don't want to miss.
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Format: Paperback
I listened to the audio version of this book and absolutely loved it. It begins with a perfect sense of time and place, set in a small high school during the 1980's, then adds well-developed, compelling characters, and a genuine mystery. From there it develops into a fascinating alternate history, a remix of superheroes, an adventure story, and a emotionally honest coming of age story with some real surprises. I loved it.
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Format: Paperback
This is better than I thought it would be. It starts off as though it is going to be a terrible teenage romance novel, and just keeps improving.
The setting is the 1980s, unashamedly. Some other reviews had mentioned 'The Breakfast Club'. While the movie is seen by the characters in the book, luckily, this is nothing like it. So, if like me you were one of the people that would have to paid cold hard cash to watch something like that, then don't worry, this book is way better.

Nate Charters is having a Buffy like experience at high school, as he is slightly odd looking, has strange eyes, and some feline type animal abilities. So, your usual yank high school jock types pick on him, needless to say. He does have a couple of friends.

Amazingly enough, he meets a cool girl that likes him, and horny inexperienced teenager instincts come to the fore.

Some after, a bombshell hits, politically. A scientist calls a news conference, and demonstrates that he can levitate, and change the color of any objects he feels like. He wants Sovereign political status for him and all people like him, and demands a meeting with Reagan, accusing all nations of the world of extreme human rights violations, when it comes to his people.

Needless to say, this is like throwing 10,000 sabre-tooth tigers among a bunch of very startled avian pests.

From there, things escalate. Nate writes an essay, assuming he is a Sovereign. One of the school bullies may be, as well. His mother pulls him out of school. The spooks come knocking.

Other people appear out of his past, with other agendas, and violence ensues.

We have elements of other milieu like The 4400, The X-Men, Runaways, and others all coming together, here.
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