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The Breaking Dawn Paperback – 2016

4.1 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 580 pages
  • Publisher: Vera Verba Inc.; 1st edition (2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0979987768
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979987762
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 7 x 2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #81,521 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
When I became a libertarian at the age of 16, by the simple fact of learning what the word meant and realizing that "I am one" - the liberty movement was based on philosophy. There was no alternative - libertarians were isolated and their thinking deviated from that of everybody around them. They had to be able to defend their beliefs, and philosophy was the only way.

Now that libertarianism - or something that is called that - is fashionable, there are many who call themselves libertarians who haven't had to defend their positions and who consequently aren't very clear about them. One key basis of libertarian philosophy that gets neglected is trusting in human beings as responsible creators and problem solvers and managers of their own existence. Which is too bad, because without that assurance, nobody has any basis for defending his or anybody else’s autonomy. In other words: if somebody else has to solve my problems, how can I assert my freedom? The libertarian writer who "got that" was Ayn Rand, and yet it is she whom the fashionable types on the LEFT, and now inside the "libertarian" movement, attack when they can. Philosophically she is impregnable, so these are typically straw-man and other ad hominem attacks. And I can't help remembering that she didn't call herself a libertarian - she considered most of those in the movement, even back then, immature and disoriented.

How can I start a review of a book that never mentions Ayn Rand with the above? Patience.

As a libertarian and a reader, I am always looking for and reading authors with a pro-freedom orientation, and of course I take an interest in how they handle the theme of liberty and how it affects their characters and plot. Paul Rosenberg’s non-fiction Production vs.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
“The Breaking Dawn,” like Paul Rosenberg's “A Nation of Wayfaring Men,” presents compelling ideas in story form. The writing itself mostly lapses into "tell, don't show," the opposite of good fiction writing. It was work to finish reading the book.

Despite that, even if you’re a fan of Mr Rosenberg (I admit I am, and subscriber to Freeman's Perspective, highly recommended), and familiar with his thinking, this story will open your eyes more than once to possibilities, and probably also help you see more clearly how we are controlled and manipulated in our current state/State. He's a profound thinker, with profound insights worth sharing.

The central theme: strengths and weaknesses of decentralization and self-organizing cooperatives versus the centralized State. Well, sort of: the weaknesses of the self-organizing cooperatives are nonexistent. They represent anarchy, as in “hey we have no oppressors; let’s do awesome s***,” not “hey we have no oppressors, let’s form gangs and terrorize each other” — the Mad Max model.

It’s a fun romp, even as at times it seems reminiscent of French post cards from 1900 predicting life in 2000 — teenage boys jumping off buildings and highway overpasses with huge hydrogen balloons strapped to their backs (what could possibly go wrong? Paging Hindenburg on the white courtesy phone). Also, I’m a little disappointed that hemp doesn’t figure as the first crop free people would grow. Given the multitude of uses for what is arguably the most valuable plant on the planet, why would the free people in The Abandons continue to produce (genetically modified) corn, one of the main culprits of the health-destroying Standard American Diet?
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
To buy this book or not? That is the question. My vote, Yes!
My whole life I’ve been confused about things, economics, integrity, politics, war, ethics, public schools, religion, governments, taxes, etc.
Starting about five years ago I seriously got into researching these subjects and found Richard Maybury and his great books, Whatever Happened to Penny Candy, is one of them.
During my research on the internet I kept running into articles (Freeman’s Weekly, by Paul Rosenberg) that were fantastic. I decided to try Paul Rosenberg’s monthly letter, Free-mans Perspective. This is some of the best reading, most truthful nonviolent words of wisdom I have ever read, INCREDIBLE, FANTASTIC!
That’s how I found out about this book, The Breaking Dawn.
This is a great book, but so much more than a fictional story. You will need to have an open mind when you read it. I think Paul was in a bit of a hurry when he put this book out. Four stars instead of five.
If you are looking for some help in trying to figure out this crazy world, here is another great stepping stone. I really enjoyed this book.
Thank you Paul!
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Format: Paperback
Paul Rosenberg's new book switches back and forth between the bad guys (REALLY bad guys) and the good guys. The bad guys get worse with each chapter, while the good guys sneak away to be free. The bad guys become dictators and pervert people's minds. As you might guess, however, the good guys win. But they go far beyond just winning and expand into amazing feats of technology and inventiveness (moon colony and space exploration). The book is easy reading, and the characters are truly lovable (or downright hate-able). I'm not sure how to categorize his story; it's certainly fiction but so close to real it's scary how bad people can be. But the story is also science fiction, sort of. As you can guess, I heartily recommend Mr. Rosenberg's new book. You'll be captured by it just as I was. (I actually read it twice so far.)
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