Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

The Breakup 2.0: Disconnecting over New Media 1st Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0801477898
ISBN-10: 0801477891
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$8.86 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$17.95 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
31 New from $8.00 53 Used from $0.01
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Security
ITPro.TV Video Training
Take advantage of IT courses online anywhere, anytime with ITPro.TV. Learn more.
$17.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Breakup 2.0: Disconnecting over New Media
  • +
  • Ways with Words: Language, Life and Work in Communities and Classrooms (Cambridge Paperback Library)
  • +
  • Literacy in American Lives
Total price: $127.30
Buy the selected items together

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In her surprisingly gripping first book, Gershon argues that Facebook and other forms of new media social networking have radically changed the playing field of accepted interactions. Generations navigate these new forms differently and a whole new set of norms is being developed to judge behavior. No subject has dominated the discussion more than the ways in which we handle romantic relationships: when they begin, when to go public, and how to bring them to an end. Do people really break up via text message? The answer is yes, and Gershon asserts that in this case "the medium is at odds with the message." A professor of communications, the author takes a distinctly academic approach, lending legitimacy to what might otherwise be easily dismissed. She understands how new media shapes social communications and addresses its constant evolution. Readers interested in communication theory and new media evolution will appreciate the author's excellent balance of analysis, anecdote, and readability. While some of her insights will undoubtedly be dated the moment this book hits the shelves, her examination will stand as an important time capsule in a constantly-evolving world.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"In her surprisingly gripping first book, Gershon argues that Facebook and other forms of new media social networking have radically changed the playing field of accepted interactions. Generations navigate these new forms differently and a whole new set of norms is being developed to judge behavior. No subject has dominated the discussion more than the ways in which we handle romantic relationships: when they begin, when to go public, and how to bring them to an end. Do people really break up via text message? The answer is yes, and Gershon asserts that in this case 'the medium is at odds with the message.' A professor of communications, the author takes a distinctly academic approach, lending legitimacy to what might otherwise be easily dismissed. She understands how new media shapes social communications and addresses its constant evolution. Readers interested in communication theory and new media evolution will appreciate the author's excellent balance of analysis, anecdote, and readability."―Publishers Weekly



"Breaking up is hard to do, and, as Ilana Gershon observes, it can be even harder when technology is brought into the mix. Gershon interviewed over 70 people (many of them college students) to examine how they used chatting, email, texting, and social networking websites in conjunction with their relationships and found that opinions and social rules governing the intersection of romance and technology are still highly variable. Why would some people rather break up through email, while others prefer instant messaging? What kind of problems arise when a couple has different ideas about how to digitally negotiate the end of their relationship? How do the social and public aspects of sites like Facebook affect one's actions during a relationship and after its dissolution? Mindful of the complicated nature of the topic, Gershon never attempts to define which behaviors are right or wrong but instead concentrates on exploring the ways people think about these tools and what their beliefs show about society's responses to technology. Though written with an academic focus, this is an intriguing read for anyone interested in how social conventions for new media develop and the ways that technology is changing romantic relationships."―Library Journal, 15 July 2010



"The Breakup 2.0 is intriguing and illuminating. By exploring how college students use Facebook, cell phones, and IM, Gershon deepens our understanding of these media, of young people's lives, and of our evolving definitions of public and private. It's an original and enlightening book."―Deborah Tannen, Georgetown University, author of You Just Don't Understand and You Were Always Mom's Favorite!



"The Breakup 2.0 is a slick, sharp, highly intelligent encounter with the most important emerging phenomenon of the twenty-first century."―Allucquére Rosanne Stone, ACTLab, University of Texas at Austin



"The Breakup 2.0 is a fascinating and thoroughly researched anthropological account of how Facebook, instant messaging, and texting reformat the media ecologies within which today's friendships and romantic relationships function and fracture. There is nothing 'virtual,’ Ilana Gershon shows, about these online arenas. Across a wide range of human relations, the form of interaction turns out to be just as crucial as its content."―Stefan Helmreich, MIT

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (February 7, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801477891
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801477898
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #876,916 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Breakup 2.0 is based on a brilliant insight: if you want to look at how the form of the message matters, look at the one situation where the content can't matter at all. What, after all, is the satisfactory answer to, "Why are you breaking up with me?"
Gershon manages to take a scholarly and thought-provoking approach to the problems involved with using new technologies, and, at the same time, provide a fun, hip, and humorous look at the processes of connection and disconnection. Having been unpleasantly dumped (hopefully) more than my fair share of times, I was reluctant to pick up this book. But it is so funny and compassionate that you will find yourself laughing and taking comfort much more than you will find yourself cringing. In fact, off hand, I don't think I found a single cringe-worthy moment.
What I did find was charming writing (facebook stalking provides little "potato chips" of information--small, bad for you, AND unsatisfying), and interesting insights into the changing face of technology. Did you know that there was once a debate over whether to answer the telephone with "Hello" or "Ahoy!"? Or that young people think that only old people write personal emails? That you are not the only one who has terrible spelling in emails and why? That people are creating fake facebook profiles to stalk each other and how to spot them?
What I loved most about this book, however, were the excerpts from interviews with college students, who are much kinder, more thoughtful, and more ethical than I would have given them credit for. Because, after all, I'm old, send personal emails, and don't know how to text.
You won't know what it all means once you've read Breakup 2.0, but you'll have a wonderful time trying to figure it out. And you'll have a better-examined life as you interact with new technologies, which you will have to do more and more. And more. UR. Sorry.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
It's fascinating how profoundly social media is altering our society and how society is reacting to the new forms of interaction brought about by technological change. In Break Up 2.0, Ilana Gershon, a lecturer in the Department of Communication and culture at Indiana University, examines the use of new technological media in the context of relationship break ups. Whether it's breaking up via text message, a change of Facebook status or an email, Gershon explores dating in the digital age.

Despite only working with a small sample of students who volunteered to participate, Gershon uncovered a variety of ways in which her students both use and interpret newer forms of communication. She discovered, essentially, that the social rules and conventions around media are still evolving and there is not yet a unified view on what is and isn't appropriate in regards to interpersonal communication.
The vignettes from the students she interviews are an interesting window into the social negotiations taking place especially in regards to the increasingly public nature of relationships.

The issue with books that examine social media is that the landscape is changing so rapidly that by the time the book is published the relevance of its findings has to be considered. When this study took place in 2007-2008, Facebook was a social platform primarily the domain of American college students, it has become much more mainstream in 2012, and its usage has continued to evolve. However Break Up 2.0 still has relevance in today's negotiation of relationships through digital media and it is an interesting examination of popular culture. The conclusions tend to be repetitive though so the book begins to drag and the language is more academic than accessible. It is a University Press title so it's intended audience, I assume, is sociology students but it could have easily been something with wider appeal, with a slightly different tone.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you're interested in media ethnographic or linguistic anthropology this book is perfect for you. A little repetitive an little outdated but the study and theories seem solid and the data and analysis was extremely interesting an enlightening.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had to purchase this for school. It was a fast read and wonderful. I enjoyed the story telling and the overall data that the author presents. It was an ethnography about the use of facebook and how we use it in the modern age. I recommend to anyone taking a language and culture class or linguistics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Through a series of entertaining and revealing interviews, mostly with college students, The Breakup 2.0 examines how new technologies are changing not only romantic relationships but the ways people end those relationships. At a moment when not everyone uses the same media and understands the media they use in different ways, Gershon explores the various ethical dilemmas which arise when people break-up over a medium rather than face-to-face. In the process Gershon makes a number of fascinating points, including the fact that people are beginning to reimagine what counts as a medium--she notes that some of interviewees are starting to describe face-to-face interaction as a medium--and that public speech is becoming less about anonymity and more about accessibility.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Breakup 2.0: Disconnecting over New Media
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Breakup 2.0: Disconnecting over New Media