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Bretta Martyn (Henry Martyn) Hardcover – July 15, 1997

3.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
Book 2 of 2 in the Henry Martyn Series

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For the swashbuckling space opera Bretta Martyn aspires to be, it is slow paced, dawdling with the interstellar politics of the "Deep," that region of space claimed eons ago by humankind. Smith, a libertarian, opines on all manner of Machiavellian schemes, often cleverly, so that reader interest is sustained. Nonetheless, the pirate Henry Martyn (of Henry Martyn [1989]), now a reluctant farmer, climbs aboard none too soon. He receives a message from his old mentor, Lia Wheeler, that the dread Oplyte slave trade has resumed, and embarks once again to fight for freedom. En route, his 15-year-old daughter, Bretta, is cast overboard, as it were, managing to land on an asteroid world of escaped slaves. A half-wild, fierce thing, Bretta soon rises to captaincy of her own ship and a fledgling career as a pirate. Smith's ornate manner almost obscures a plot very like those of the Star Wars movies, but he gets there, nonetheless, often with great good humor. John Mort
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Product Details

  • Series: Henry Martyn
  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; 1st edition (July 15, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312858930
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312858933
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 5.8 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,968,995 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Mass Market Paperback
In Bretta Martyn, L. Neil Smith reprises his earlier book, Henry Martyn, by weaving the tale of how the notorious space-brigand's young daughter, Bretta, grows from rambuctious tomboy on a rustic frontier planet to a strong-willed, battle-hardened leader of refugees and sacker of evil empires.
All this, and more, takes place over 1000 years in our future, in a galaxy populated, predominately, by human beings who sail the Deep in starships romantically similar to those which once plied the oceans of long-dead Earth.
In much the same way as he did in his popular book, The Probability Broach, Smith manages to weave a beautifully fantastic tale of fast-paced adventure and imaginative technology while, at the same time, delivering a strong treatise on the evils of Federalism and the glories of a laissez-faire, free-market system.
Political value aside, Bretta Martyn is a fabulous yarn guaranteed to activate every last emotion in any reader, and spark the imagination of young and old. :)
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a bit wordy, but a good read, nonetheless. Almost half the book was used to setup the plot for the rest of the book, a bit of a waste IMHO, but I really like the author's style and libertarian philosophy. The second half of the book was much better than the first half, making the whole book worth the read!

If you liked his other books, you'll like this one, too.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I really liked this book. The back made it sound as if it were going to be different, but the way it turned out was just fine, too. I gave it 4 stars because the book was a little slow in some parts, and I did not like how the prologe/epilogs were written, but other than that, it was a pretty good book.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Bretta Sucks: A Review of BRETTA MARTYN

_____Folks, I have certain hopes and expectations every time I pick up a new science fiction novel. To start, will it have a decent writing style, being written coherently at least? Will the plot kick butt and maybe have some originality? The characters, are they worth following? Those are the kinds of questions dancing through my mind as my fingers pinch the opening pages of any novel I buy outright or borrow from the library. It's too darned bad that these expectations keep getting thrashed, dashed and smashed every other time they come up against something written in the genre. It's enough to make a person leap from the side of a ship piloted by space pirates.
_____For those of you still guessing, yes-sir-ee-Bob, BRETTA MARTYN is yet another horribly written piece of junk from the post-1990s generation of science fiction writers, yet another bad book. There are just so many things that the book does wrong that I barely know where to begin. The writing style, oh yeah, that is almost always a heaping helping of Hellish trouble for post-1990s sci-fi writers, and BRETTA MARTYN has a writing style that sucks in that regard. Plot construction with this novel also sucks. For goodness' sakes, half the book is spent with the characters doing nothing but dressing up and swapping gossip! More on that later. A mutant space-caveman in a tunneled-out asteroid could do better, even while sober.
_____I'll begin with where the crap-flow gets its start: the writing style. Inherent in the writing style is the narrative--which is very badly executed. Something gets described, okay? Then it gets over-described some more.
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