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Bringing Up the Brass Hardcover – Illustrated, 2002

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Vermont Heritage Press (2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0911853170
  • ISBN-13: 978-0911853179
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #298,875 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Andrew S. Rogers VINE VOICE on October 25, 2004
I've been a fan since childhood of "The Long Gray Line," the John Ford film that was based on this book, and so I've wanted to read "Bringing Up the Brass" for a long time. Finally doing so was a rewarding experience -- not only (although mostly) to meet the real Marty Maher behind the Tyrone Power character, but also to see what was gained and what was lost when the novel was adapted to the screen.

If, like me, you come to this book through the prism of the movie, you'll find this story a lot less linear than the movie. Although Marty tells his story (and it's clear from the text that most of this book was literally "as told to" his coauthor Nardi Reeder Campion) in a mostly chronological way, there's still a bit of skipping around and some gaps in the time-frame. Not everything fits together quite as well as it does in the film, but life is like that. The book also lacks the sometimes-schmaltzy sentimentality of the film.

At the same time, the reader who knows the movie will be able to recognize many of the seeds in this book that grew into key scenes on film.

The more interesting and honest task, though, is to try to separate the movie from the book and read (and review) the latter on its own merits. When you do, Marty comes across as a charming and entertaining man with an interesting story to tell. He saw an awful lot in his half-century-plus at West Point, and does seem to have been truly beloved by generations of graduates. He certainly could have filled many more pages with his reminiscences, and it's perhaps a shame that he didn't. I would have liked to have read more about life on the Point and how it changed over the decades.
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Today I was looking for "Bringing up the Brass" with Marty Maher. I couldn't find it so I looked on Amazon. com and they didn't have it either. Marty and my Dad were big buddies. They loved to share a drink at Al Cohen's Park Restaurant and as I grew up I was invited to join them once in awhile. When WW 2 broke out I went with a couple of friends and joined the Army. After three years of service I came home from Europe. I took the train home and walked up the steep hill from the station. Excited to be home I stopped in Cohen's for a drink before going home to shock by Mom and Dad. There were no cell phones in 1945. I walked in, taking my favorite seat by the window. I heard a voice from up the bar: "Give that soldier a drink!" It was Marty Maher and sitting with him was my dad. Patrick, the bartender didn't know what to say, but he poured me my favorite drink. It took me a few minutes to try to relax. I walked up the bar to greet Marty and my Dad. I was home! Will I find a copy of "Bringing up the Brass? I think so!
4 Comments 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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A Kid's Review on September 21, 2007
I agree with everything the first reviewer said. I had the pleasure of actually "Bringing Up the Brass". Believe it or not, I found a copy in my local library. I returned it when I finished it. I tried to go back, but the library has no listing for it anymore. Sad
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Great Father's Day Gift. He has almost finished it and was throilled by the great condition it is in. thanks!
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