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Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants, Updated and Expanded by [Douglas W. Tallamy, Rick Darke]
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Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants, Updated and Expanded Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 532 ratings

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Editorial Reviews

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Restoring Natives to Suburbia: A Call to Action
Gardeners enjoy their hobby for many reasons: a love of plants and nature, the satisfaction that comes from beautifying home and community, the pleasures of creative effort, the desire to collect rare or unusual species, and the healthful benefits of exercise and outdoor air. For some people, like my wife and me, there is pleasure in just watching plants grow.

But now, for the first time in its history, gardening has taken on a role that transcends the needs of the gardener. Like it or not, gardeners have become important players in the management of our nation’s wildlife. It is now within the power of individual gardeners to do something that we all dream of doing: to make a difference. In this case, the “difference” will be to the future of biodiversity, to the native plants and animals of North America and the ecosystems that sustain them.

For decades, many horticulture writers have been pleading for a fresh appreciation of our American flora, and for almost as long they have been largely (or entirely) ignored. For several reasons, however, the day of the native ornamental is drawing near; the message is finally beginning to be heard. If I were to ask a random group of gardeners to comment on the importance of native plants in their gardens, they would probably recount several arguments that have been made in recent years in favor of natives over alien ornamentals. They might describe the “sense of place” that is created by using plants that “belong” or the dangers of releasing yet another species of invasive alien to outcompete and smother native vegetation. They might recognize the costly wastefulness of lawns populated with alien grasses that demand high-nitrogen fertilizers, broad-leaf herbicides, and pollution-belching mowers. Or they might mention the imperative of rescuing endangered native plants from extinction. These are all well-documented reasons for the increasing popularity of growing native plants.

Owners of native nurseries are also finding it easier and easier to enumerate the benefits of their offerings. Native plants are well adapted to their particular ecological niche and so are often far less difficult to grow than species from other altitudes, latitudes, and habitats. After all, these plants evolved here and were growing just fine long before we laid our heavy hands on the landscape.

Most compelling to me, however, is the use of native species to create simplified vestiges of the ecosystems that once made this land such a rich source of life for its indigenous peoples and, later, for European colonists and their descendants. That most of our ecosystems are no longer rich is beyond debate, and today, most of the surviving remnants of the native flora that formed them have been finished off by development or invaded by alien plant species. Too many Oak Parks, Hickory Hills, and Fox Hollows—developments named, as the environmentalist Bill McKibben has noted, for the bit of nature they have just extirpated—have been built across the country. Although relatively small, strategically placed and connected patches of completely restored habitats might foster the survival of some of our wildlife, I will describe later why such habitat islands can only protect a tiny fraction of the species that once thrived in North America. With 300 million human souls already present in the United States and no national recognition of the limits of our land’s ability to support additional millions, we simply have not left enough intact habitat for most of our species to avoid extinction. All species need space in order to dodge the extinction bullet. So far we have not shared space very well with our fellow earthlings. In the following pages, I hope to convince you that, for our own good and certainly for the good of other species, we must do better. Native plants will play a disproportionately large role in our success.

The transition from alien ornamentals to native species will require a profound change in our perception of the landscaping value of native ornamentals. Europeans first fell in love with the exotic beauty of plants that evolved on other continents when the great explorers returned home with beautiful species no one had ever seen before. It quickly became fashionable and a signal of wealth and high status to landscape with alien ornamentals that no one else had access to. As the first foreign ornamentals became more common in the landscape, the motivation to seek new alien species increased. Even today, the drive to obtain unique species or cultivars is a primary factor governing how we select plants for our landscapes.
 
--This text refers to the paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

“This updated and expanded edition. . . is a delight to read and a most needed resource.” —Cabin Life

As Doug Tallamy eloquently explains, everyone can welcome more wildlife into their yards just by planting even a few native plants. With fascinating explanations and extensive lists of native plants for regional habitats, this scientifically researched book can help us all to make a difference. No prior training is needed to become a backyard ecologist—but Tallamy's book can be a vital first set. For more information, please visit www.plantnative.com.
--This text refers to the paperback edition.

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4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5
532 customer ratings
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Reviewed in the United States on May 2, 2018
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Reviewed in the United States on June 30, 2015
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Reviewed in the United States on June 10, 2018
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Top international reviews

Desiree
4.0 out of 5 stars Oh, I wish it was written about the UK
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 30, 2019
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Sandy G
5.0 out of 5 stars It has changed the way I garden and how I see the beauty in it
Reviewed in Canada on February 6, 2015
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9 people found this helpful
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Vin
5.0 out of 5 stars Guide to sustaining nature 'at home' if we'll listen
Reviewed in Canada on December 18, 2016
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SADOT OCON MORALES
5.0 out of 5 stars Excelente visión del paisaje
Reviewed in Mexico on September 22, 2018
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sherlock
5.0 out of 5 stars Easy to read but very thought provoking
Reviewed in Canada on February 16, 2018
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Zoom
5.0 out of 5 stars A startlingly readable book
Reviewed in Canada on April 12, 2015
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John P.Walas
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent resource for responsibly managing wildlife and native plants
Reviewed in Canada on February 4, 2018
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Varun Sharma
5.0 out of 5 stars An amazing book and guide to native nature gardens
Reviewed in India on July 14, 2014
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Jimmy D
5.0 out of 5 stars A Good Read
Reviewed in Canada on March 7, 2014
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Sylvia Chorney
4.0 out of 5 stars but was told it is a very useful book for rural
Reviewed in Canada on December 27, 2015
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K Splane
4.0 out of 5 stars thoughtful analysis on our role in the process of sustaining local ecosystems
Reviewed in Canada on June 11, 2014
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vilma
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Reviewed in Canada on June 8, 2015
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