Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Pastimebooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good: Cover and pages show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Bringing Up Oscar: The Story of the Men and Women Who Founded the Academy Hardcover – January 15, 2011

4.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2.47 $0.01

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In January 1927, movie mogul Louis B. Mayer gathered together 36 of the leading movers and shakers in the still-fledgling film industry and proposed the founding of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, arguing that by working together this group of cantankerous individualists could ensure that business would prosper in the coming decades. From Thalberg to Warner to DeMille, Mayer’s big idea was met with approval, and the academy was born, eventually to give birth itself to a statuette called Oscar. In this fascinating if scattered account, Pawlak gallops through the early history of moviemaking, following the various careers of the original 36. Much of this material—especially about the moguls—is available elsewhere, but by focusing on all the founders, Pawluk is able to re-create the peculiar form of community that existed among a group of otherwise vicious competitors. Unfortunately, the book is devoid of any real narrative structure, and the unnecessary repetition of the same stories becomes more than a little annoying. Still, for those willing to mine the rambling text for anecdotes, there are nuggets aplenty to be found here. --Bill Ott

Review

“[This] fast-paced, light look at an epoch in film history will be of interest to those seeking a quick read or a starting point on the mythology of old Hollywood.” (Library Journal)

“Pawlak traces the lives of the 36 key figures in the cinema community who launched the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1927, the same year talkies arrived with The Jazz Singer. By skillfully weaving such highlights of Hollywood history throughout this Tinseltown tapestry, Pawlak succeeds in recreating that colorful era when flickers turned into features and silents converted to sound.” (Publishers Weekly)
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Pegasus; First Edition edition (January 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1605981370
  • ISBN-13: 978-1605981376
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.4 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,638,674 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Mary Glickman on January 22, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm a Hollywood buff of sorts. I love reading about the Golden Age of Hollywood and the stars that populated Hollywood's greatest years (by this I mean the 30s and 40s). But this book takes us back to the origins of all that and does it brilliantly. The wealth of anecdote surprises. I feel when reading it as if I'm being transported to an age of innovation unmatched in mordern times. Granted, I've not read the book sequentially but enjoyed dipping here and there. Maybe it's meant to be read that way as its strength, to my mind, is incident and personality. To everyone who stays up waaay past their bedtime to take in the whole of Oscar Night I say: Kudos to the author. Let's hear more!
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Fascinating reading!!! This compelling story of early Hollywood, and the men and women involved in acting, filming, and producing the first movies, brings history to life! I learned about so much behind the scenes history in the movie industry. And I met and got acquainted with the influential people I had only heard about.

Ms. Pawlak has a comfortable, conversational, down to earth style of writing. The reader feels like the author is sitting with her in a cozy room, sharing the story over a steaming cup of coffee. :)

Her passion for this topic shines through! If you enjoy movies, this is a must read!
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Since I’m a movie freak and have read many, many accounts of Hollywood and its beginnings, when I saw Debra Ann Pawlak’s Bringing Up Oscar: The Story of the Men and Women Who Founded the Academy, I thought, “Wow! I’ve never read an in-depth look at the Motion Picture Academy, formally known as The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. I expected to find out just what this institution does in addition to giving out those shiny little men. But since I can read the title, I knew the book would focus more on the people who had the idea for the academy. And oh—it does. The first half of the book details each of the producers, writers, actors, actresses, techies, and one theater owner who thought up this institution. I can save you time: almost each and every one of them were dirt poor, hard-scrabble immigrants who decided working in the fledgling industry would be a good thing, started in the east, and eventually migrated west because it was warmer, sunnier, and free of the restrictions placed upon the new industry by its inventor Thomas Edison. And not only is this story repeated in slight variations, but you will find out the birth dates and birth places of each, including any siblings they may have had. Then suddenly, towards the middle, they meet and have this idea. The academy comes to fruition. Then the book becomes less tedious, as each one of them is dealt with again, this time describing their deaths (mostly heart attacks.) What career facts are told in this section are, for the most part, repeats of myriad facts told in the first section. Get the idea? This is a very repetitious book. Great for high schoolers doing research on the film industry; not so great for those of us who just want to enjoy reading about early Hollywood.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
What the author has done is long overdue. Only by understanding who the founding fathers of the Academy were - only by understanding who the men and women were as people, their motivations, their family history, their roots - can we understand the preeminent art form of the 20th century... an art form that has changed everything in our lives, whether we like it or not. The academy, the Oscars, are perhaps the hook to this book, but what is more important is getting to know the real people, the real ambition and passion of the people who made the industry. Damn fine book!
And there's a great review here too, from UCLA film school: [...]
1 Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse