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Broadway Bound Paperback – November 1, 1988

4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Paperback, November 1, 1988
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--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

YA The final play in Simon's autobiographical trilogy, this is nothing short of brilliant. The story is both rib-tickling and heart-wrenching; the Jerome family is troubled, warm, and funny. The late 1940s finds Eugene Jerome trying to tackle television as a comedy writer while watching the deteriorating marriage of his parents and a grandfather who marches to his own drummer. Readers of this play will feel the joys and sorrows of a bygone era when family played a larger role in one's life. Simon's exquisite imagery and humor capture the love each of us harbors for our family but loses within our cluttered lives. This play will be an asset to any theater collection, as well as one that many will choose for recreational reading. Joseph Harper, Episcopal High School, Bellaire

Copyright 1988 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

The last play in Simon's semiautobiographical Brighton Beach Trilogy, about aspiring writer ""Eugene Jerome,"" starts Eugene toward marriage and a career in writing comedy as his nuclear family undergoes various forms of fission around him. There are no weak links in the performance ensemble, only strong and stronger, with JoBeth Williams the standout for her often-affecting, even powerful, depiction of Eugene's mother. Of course, she does get the juiciest moments in this mixture of humor and drama. This deft production, while not profound, moves and entertains. The infectious laughter of a live audience enhances the experience. --AudioFile Magazine<br /><br />This third and final installment in Simon's semiautobiographical trilogy of playsfollowing ""Brighton Beach Memoirs"" (1983) and ""Biloxi Blues"" (1985), recordings of which are also available from L.A. Theatre Workshas brothers Eugene and Stanley struggling amid a family crisis to write a radio comedy skit in preparation for a major audition. A 1987 Tony Award nominee, it is a powerful and compelling story mediated by deft comedic positioning perfectly executed by the eight-person cast, particularly by Scott Wolfe (as Eugene) and Alan Mandell (as Grandfather Ben), who provide most of the laughs. The sound effects further make this a rich listening experience. For those fond of old-time radio drama and comedy. --Library Journal

This third and final installment in Simon's semiautobiographical trilogy of playsfollowing ""Brighton Beach Memoirs"" (1983) and ""Biloxi Blues"" (1985), recordings of which are also available from L.A. Theatre Workshas brothers Eugene and Stanley struggling amid a family crisis to write a radio comedy skit in preparation for a major audition. A 1987 Tony Award nominee, it is a powerful and compelling story mediated by deft comedic positioning perfectly executed by the eight-person cast, particularly by Scott Wolfe (as Eugene) and Alan Mandell (as Grandfather Ben), who provide most of the laughs. The sound effects further make this a rich listening experience. For those fond of old-time radio drama and comedy. --Library Journal --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 118 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (November 1, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452261481
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452261488
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,625,003 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
With 1986's BROADWAY BOUND, Neil Simon brought to completion the semi-autobiographical trilogy he began with BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS (1983) and continued with BILOXI BLUES (1985). For those coming to BROADWAY BOUND never having read or seen the two preceding plays, a bit of context is needed. Eugene Morris Jerome is Simon's alter ego in all three plays, while Stanley Jerome, Eugene's older brother, is Simon's older brother, the TV writer Danny Simon (who died in July 2005). Eugene is the protagonist/narrator of all three plays. BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS shows him struggling to find his identity among his large family in Brooklyn, New York. BILOXI BLUES depicts his first break with the family as he joins the Army. And BROADWAY BOUND, set in 1949, dramatizes a pivotal period in his life, made up of his efforts to launch, with Stanley, a comedy writing career - a career which would enable both him and Stanley to leave home permanently. As the decision to leave home is a major theme in BROADWAY BOUND, this comedy is arguably sadder in its tone than the two which precede it, or than nearly any other work by the playwright whose name has, in recent decades, become virtually synonymous with the term "Broadway comedy."
In terms of the Jerome trilogy, BROADWAY BOUND is a fitting culmination. It is an unusually complex comedy, alternating humor and gravity, and scenes involving three generations of family members: the elderly (Grandfather Ben), the middle-aged (Kate and Jack Jerome; Kate's sister Blanche), and the young (the sons, Stanley and Eugene).
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This was a seminal journey through Neil Simon's eyes. Of course, if anyone knows the "road to Broadway" it's him. The show takes much of the personal journey and makes it an 'everyman' type story. Again, it' pure Simon but with more of that humanity touch that was the hallmark of his later works. I enjoy Neil Simon's mind so I was bound to like this. And I did. If you enjoy modern theatre, with the comedic touch (whether you want to write yourself or just be in the audience) this is a good choice.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I experienced this play long before I experienced the other two plays in the trilogy, and I was never lost or confused. It immediately became one of my all-time favorite plays -- so funny, so poignant, so true. It's sadness is part of its richness. Highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback
Well, this may be a sad way to end the "light-hearted" series, but it's based on what happened to Neil Simon in real life. Easily the most poignant of the trilogy, and the best dramatic work. It's a pity this probably isn't going to make it to DVD, as people don't like "sad" with their "funny".
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Format: Hardcover
"Broadway Bound" marks the end of Simon's trilogy, and it's very dark and sad - not how I had hoped the trilogy would end. I found the characters different, but of course, you can say they matured, but Stanley was much more frantic than I remembered him to be. Eugene was much more level headed - not the sex-crazed teenage boy we knew and loved. Blanche lost her quirkiness, and the outcome of Jack and Kate disappointed me. The addition of Ben was what saved the play; the way Eugene played off of him was like "old times." I didn't feel the Jerome's were the Jerome's anymore. I do not recommend.
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