Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.99
  • Save: $2.73 (14%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 17 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Broadway Musicals: The Bi... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Minimal wear.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Broadway Musicals: The Biggest Hit & the Biggest Flop of the Season - 1959 to 2009 Paperback – September 1, 2010

3.8 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.26
$7.38 $1.34

Intrusion: A Novel
A loving couple, grieving the loss of their son, finds their marriage in free fall when a beautiful, long-lost acquaintance inserts herself into their lives. Learn More
$17.26 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 17 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Broadway Musicals: The Biggest Hit & the Biggest Flop of the Season - 1959 to 2009
  • +
  • The Great Parade: Broadway's Astonishing, Never-to-Be-Forgotten 1963-1964 Season
Total price: $40.75
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

PETER FILICHIA (New York, NY) is the critic for the Star-Ledger and News 12 New Jersey. Each week, he writes a column for MasterworksBroadway.com and three columns for Theatermania.com. He is a past president of the Drama Desk, the current president of the Theatre World Awards, and the author of Let's Put On a Musical!
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 260 pages
  • Publisher: Applause Theatre & Cinema Books (September 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1423495624
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423495628
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,129,695 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Peter Filichia is one of the few writers who can come up with historical tidbits about the musical theater that even I didn't know. His choices for the "Hits" are rarely all that surprising (although his revelations are often new and entertaining) but his "Flops" will certainly prompt a lot of discussion. Just when you think you've figured out his system (big anticipation, big let-down), he'll throw in a ringer that you've never even heard of. Even one performance disasters are pushed aside by shows that closed in previews or on-the-road. In one remarkable instance he chooses a show that closed before rehearsals even started!!! If your knowledge of musical theater is limited to just the well-known shows, you'll love reading about the Hits and be completely baffled by the Flops, but more passionate musical theater buffs will relish everything. Be prepared, though, to be a little frustrated when Filichia skips over the show you were expecting -- Ken Mandelbaum has already covered that territory. Filichia has other tricks up his sleeve.
Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For any lover of the Broadway Musical (Yes! CAPS!) this is one of the most marvelous and saddest books available. Sure, one can quibble with some of Filichia's choices, especially in re: flops (where's "Greenwillow", "Ilya, Darling", "Drat, the Cat", "Bravo Giovanni!", and, of course, my "favourite" "Happy Town"?) but one can't escape two very important aspects of the book. First: Unlike all too many critics, when Filichia offers suggestions as to what went wrong with a show and how it could have been fixed, he's invariably right. Second, and this is where the sadness enters: The remarkable mediocrity of the biggest hits as we get closer and closer to the present, makes one despair as to whether it will ever again be commercially viable for anyone to try to write a truly great (or, even better than average) musical. Filichia, himself, seems to address this with his afterword on Stephen Sondheim (who has, in financial terms, rarely had a big "hit"). Moreover, Sondheim at least had the opportunity of starting to make his name in the older musical theater and was an already established icon when the biggest changes occured. Would anyone, today, even give a new Sondheim a chance? Ah well. For those of us who still remember... GET THIS BOOK!!!!!!!!
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Enjoyable overall, but way too much space is spent on going over the plot points and songs for both the hits and the flops. I'm more interested in some of the backstage gossip and why shows succeeded or failed. I don't need five pages on every single plot point of "Applause" for instance, and how it differed from "All About Eve". Who cares? That's not what the book is supposed to be about. Ken Mandlebaum's book "Not Since Carrie" was much more on point. Even though it dealt only with flops, at least it talked about what happened out of town, why things didn't work, etc. I would have liked to have seen more of that in this book, rather than plot synopses ad nauseum.
I also felt that some of the topics Filichia highlighted were downright bizarre. For instance, one poster already spoke of his discussion of George Andrews, who has been with "Phantom" since the beginning. This is what he chooses to talk about for the longest-running show in Broadway history? Likewise, for "Crazy for You", we get a few pages of what Beth Leavel was "thinking about" when she was singing in the chorus? I like her as much as anyone, but come on....
By the way, speaking of editing, this book needs some heavy-duty proof-reading. There are missing words, wrong words (i.e., "pop marker" instead of "pop market") and unfinished sentences. Doesn't anyone proof read anymore?
1 Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What a mixed bag of a book, this is!

It briefly reviews and explains what the author thinks was the biggest "hit" and biggest "flop" for musicals on Broadway in a 50 year span. It sounds pretty straight-forward.

But what if the "biggest flop" wasn't a finished musical, but just a workshop of a musical in development ("Wise Guys," considered the biggest flop of the 1999-2000 season)? What if the biggest flop musical isn't even a musical ("The New Musicals Project," considered the biggest flop musical of 1990-1991)?

I suppose that, since the title doesn't specify "NEW" musicals, that I shouldn't be disappointed when revivals are considered the biggest hit ("South Pacific" in 2007-2008) and biggest flop ("On The Town," 1971-1972), even then there were notable new hits and flops during those years.

I DO have an issue or two about a book being about hit and flop "Broadway musicals" that include so many shows that never made it to New York at all being considered "Broadway musicals." There are shows included that never even went into rehearsal, as well as numerous that never played New York at all. How can a show that only played in Washington DC or Philadelphia be considered a "Broadway musical?"

There also isn't a very consistent view of what makes a "hit" or what makes a "flop." In the preface, the author states that it's mostly about making money, but then doesn't follow through with that thought. "Shrek," which lost about $25 million and is the biggest money-loser of all time isn't considered to be the biggest flop of the year. "Carrie," which set the record for losing money in the 80s was considered less of a flop than "Chess" because of "expectations," according to the author.
Read more ›
1 Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Broadway Musicals: The Biggest Hit & the Biggest Flop of the Season - 1959 to 2009
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Broadway Musicals: The Biggest Hit & the Biggest Flop of the Season - 1959 to 2009

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: broadway sheet music