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Bug Enhanced, Original recording remastered

4.7 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Enhanced, Original recording remastered, March 22, 2005
$40.14 $9.25

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Editorial Reviews

Dinosaur Jr.'s first three albums 'Dinosaur,' 'You're Living All Over Me' and 'Bug ' were all previously released by the Homestead and SST labels. The CDs have been remastered and include a smattering of bonus tracks and rare photos. Sonic Youth's Thurston Moore, Mike Watt and Guided By Voices' Robert Pollard contributed to new liner notes. Merge. 2005.

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Freak Scene
  2. No Bones
  3. They Always Come
  4. Yeah We Know
  5. Let It Ride
  6. Pond Song
  7. Budge
  8. The Post
  9. Don't
  10. Keep the Glove
  11. Freak Scene [Video]


Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 22, 2005)
  • Rmst and Rmst ed. edition
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Enhanced, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Merge Records
  • ASIN: B0007NMKB2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #121,088 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

A Kid's Review on August 25, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Being 13 years old, I missed all the my favorite bands when they were in their prime (Sonic Youth, Polvo, Pavement etc etc), which is upsetting at times but at least I can get these sweet reissues.

I read about DJ from the coolest record reviewer,Mark Prindle [...] I liked what he had to say and looked furiously for these records. Well, it just happened to be the day that I went to the record store, that these things came out. I had to beg some guy to let me buy it, but I got it!

All the songs are fantastic. Let It Ride has to be the best song on here, in my opinion. The Post is one of the greatest noise songs ever. J is a guitar genious.

I highly recommend this and I'm waiting patiently for the reunited Dino to come down to Florida so I can finally see a great band.
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Format: Audio CD
This CD has no less impact than when it came out eighteen years ago. As Byron Coley says on the band's website, it shows their sound becoming more orderly as they were ready to burst from internal strife. Well, sad but true, but tension often makes for the best music of a band's career, and J didn't live up to the manic glory here ever again. (Now this line-up is reunited! Got to see them for the first time with Lou on bass last week. HO-LY CRRRRRAAAP!!!).

So many highlights, where do you start? I think Kurt really learned the soft/hard dynamic from J, and in many ways J's use of it sounds more fresh (likely because a trillion J wanna-be's failed to ever pop up--only a score, Kurt being one of them). The album starts with this in somewhat famous fashion on "Freak Scene," where there's a major chord strumming pattern that is mildly distorted. Within in a minute, the low E power chord is thrashed so hard that the piece resembles a form of proto-death metal. The middle part is really pretty . . . and then back to the death metal. A lot of the songs feature this dynamic & it really never gets boring. If you have the right tools, use them to make as many creations as possible. I think my favorite use of this dynamic is in "Pond Song." It starts out with a delicate picking pattern: "Long distance left you undecided/ I'd sprinkle enough to let you know," J pathetically croons to the girlfriend he never finds. Before you know it, the song is awash in fuzz, reverb, and thrashing chords. This pattern happens to match J's attitude towards his love interest, which alternates between tender yearning and murderous disenchantment, best reflected in "Freak Scene": "Sometimes I don't thrill you/ Sometimes I think I'll kill you.
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Format: Audio CD
I will always be grateful to this album, and offerings by Sonic Youth and R.E.M., for slipping that first wedge into the popular music scene that eventually crushed the deplorable New Wave/Glam Rock/Hair Metal axis that dominated late '80s music. The last album from the original Dinosaur Jr, with Lou Barlow on bass, this album was the high-water mark of Dino's earlier work, melding J Mascis' supernatural songwriting talent with Barlow's noise experimentation. Often called "sludge," I call it primordial beauty. "Freak Scene," with its melodic groove and danceable beat, quickly became a college favorite, and many felt it was going to be the band's commercial breakthrough. It's a tune you'll love no matter what your tastes. My own favorite track, "Yeah We Know," has a pulse-pounding triple-beat, with one of those melancholy Dino choruses where J Mascis manages to make you feel his pain even if you don't know what the hell he's talking about. In general, the first five tracks (original Side 1), have more structure and melody, while the remaining tracks tend to be sludgier, less coherent and more experimental. This is a must-have for any serious music fan.
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Format: Audio CD
Back in 1988 this record, along with Sonic Youth's "Daydream Nation" and the Pixies "Dolittle", just blew everything else that came out away. Nowadays it still does. This is guitar rock at its best. Simply massive. And if you listen real close... you'll even hear the great pop melodies underneath the layers upon layers of guitars. Just buy it.
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Format: Audio CD
"Bug" is an outstanding album on its own, though it is not-- in my opinion-- as good as its predecessor. Still, there is little to complain about on this CD. Even the uber-obnoxious "Don't" is tolerable due to J Mascis' extended jam in the background. "Freak Scene" is a Dinosaur staple. "They Always Come" is a punk delight that transforms into an orgasmic, heavenly, layered guitar burst for its second half. Even the overlooked "The Post" was good enough for the Cowboy Junkies to later cover (with questionable success). This is a must-have for any respectable Dinosaur fan, or for any fan of true indie rock.
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Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
Great album of course but ignore the "(LP + MP3)" in the title, this is just the LP with no download card or AutoRip. Amazon couldn't provide the MP3 but the did give me a credit to apologize.
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Format: Audio CD
This CD has no less impact than when it came out eighteen years ago. As Byron Coley says on the band's website, it shows their sound becoming more orderly as they were ready to burst at the seams from internal strife. Well, sad but true, but tension often makes for the best music of a band's career, and J didn't live up to the manic glory here ever again. (Now this line-up is reunited! Get to see them for the first time with Lou on bass next month. HO-LY CRRRRRAAAP!!!).

So many highlights, where do you start? I think Kurt really learned the soft/hard dynamic from J, and in many ways J's use of it sounds more fresh (likely because a trillion J wanna-be's failed to ever pop up--only a score, Kurt being one of them). The album starts with this in somewhat famous fashion on "Freak Scene," where there's a major chord strumming pattern that is mildly distorted. Within in a minute, the low E power chord is thrashed so hard that the piece resembles a form of proto-death metal. The middle part is really pretty . . . and then back to the death metal. A lot of the songs feature this dynamic & it really never gets boring. If you have the right tools, use them to make as many creations as possible. I think my favorite use of this dynamic is in "Pond Song." It starts out with a delicate picking pattern: "Long distance left you undecided/ I'd sprinkle enough to let you know," J pathetically croons to the girlfriend he never finds. Before you know it, the song is awash in fuzz, reverb, and thrashing chords. This pattern happens to match J's attitude towards his love interest, which alternates between tender yearning and murderous disenchantment, best reflected in "Freak Scene": "Sometimes I don't thrill you/ Sometimes I think I'll kill you.
Read more ›
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