Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

How to Build a Time Machine Reprint Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0142001868
ISBN-10: 0142001864
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$6.00 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$13.52 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
38 New from $2.75 62 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $10.00
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Grid: The Fraying Wires Between Americans and Our Energy Future by Gretchen Bakke Ph.D.
"The Grid" by Gretchen Bakke Ph.D.
Charting the history of our electrical grid, Bakke helps us see what we all take for granted, shows it as central to our culture and identity as a people, and reveals it to be the linchpin in our aspirations for a clean energy future. Learn more
$13.52 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • How to Build a Time Machine
  • +
  • Time Travel in Einstein's Universe: The Physical Possibilities of Travel Through Time
  • +
  • How to Build a Time Machine: The Real Science of Time Travel
Total price: $41.91
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Paul Davies is an internationally acclaimed theoretical physicist and the author of God and the New Physics, The Mind of God, and many other popular books. In 1995 he won the prestigious Templeton Prize for his work on the philosophical meaning of science and was recently awarded the Kelvin Medal by the UK Institute of Physics. Davies lives in Australia and frequently travels, teaches, and lectures in the United States.

From Booklist

A time-traveling machine can be constructed--provided one rotates a superdense cylinder of infinite length or locates a wormhole. Such are the contraptions contemporary physicists such as Frank Tipler and Kip Thorne (Black Holes and Time Warps, 1994) have conceived in their explorations of whether it's possible to build a time machine. Davies, also a physicist, has an impressive track record of writing popular titles about space-time (e.g., About Time, 1995), and he opens up the fascinating yet weird concept of time travel to readers new to the basic features of space-time. That does not mean his precis is simple, but it is lucid throughout, even sketching out the four technical parts required in a time machine that exploits quantum effects. And if a machine were actually built, many paradoxes would arise, which Davies explores in an inventive manner. An excellent explainer, Davies will well reward the curious bent on bending space-time. Gilbert Taylor
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (March 25, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142001864
  • ISBN-13: 978-0142001868
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.4 x 7.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #857,783 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
First of all, If you have already read some books on black holes and worm holes/time travel, you probably won't learn much from the book as it is non-mathematical (the only equation is E=mc^2) and introduces only the fundamental aspects of time, space and time travel. Otherwise you might want to take a moment and read on before buying it.
I understand that most authors spend a lot of time on their books, even though the books themselves might not stand out in the end. As such, I am really reluctant to give their books any low grade. But this book really has little to deserve my praise, so I give it a 3.
The book is rather short. English is not my native language, but I still finished it in 3 hours in a bookstore.
I feel the book is divided into 3 parts: first part introduces relativity (including things like light and gravity) and black holes; second part discusses how to construct (at least in theory) a worm hole that can be used as a time machine; and the last part deals with the paradoxes and implications of time travel.
I think the author was not sure what level of audience he's targeting. The first part is easy to understand for everyone. But that is not what audience want to learn from the book--they want to know about time machines. So they turn to the last two parts, which may be a bit hard for them. For instance, the author mentioned rotating black holes, but nowhere in the book he explained what they are. He also mentioned their ring-like singularity but he didn't even put a drawing to help readers to understand. I am quite serious about science and I read a few books on the subject so I know what rotating black holes are like.
Read more ›
2 Comments 56 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Paul Davies is a great author. But some readers may find some of his books long as books usually are. This one not. It is short, but clear cut goal-oriented and conceptually deep. You will understand some concepts that seemed so confusing too you. Most of all, you will see things under a different light. Physics at its best. Just a warning: you can read it in an afternoon, but you will probably become so interested that you will want to spend a lot more time with wonderful books and subjects like these. The fun will last only about 150 pages.
Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Davies has attempted a very difficult task: how to write a brief and easily understood account of the physics and mathematics underpinning the idea of time travel.
In the main part Davies succeeds admirably. It is clearly not that simple to condense highly complex mathematical equations, and concepts of and about quantum physics to a level that the ordinary person will not only grasp but perhaps think about.
The book is effectively divided into two parts. The first is a synopsis of the theories underpinning time travel. In this section Davies provides a speedy overview of the history of thinking about time travel, the development of the theories, and he attempts to at least conceptually work through the possibilities and problems associated with the main theories that hold currency.
In the second part, Davies sets out the mechanics of how to build a time machine. The content contained in is part, not matter how hard Davies tries, and despite its brevity, was very difficult for this reader to understand. Having no background in pure physics, I became a bit lost in places. But struggling through out, it is still informative and challenging.
Overall, the book is a valuable starting point for the general person to get a grip on this though provoking topic.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased this book for my 12 year. He's taken an interest in Quantum physics. He has kept such an interest in this book I am beyond amazed. He keeps it with him with his notebook and dictionary handy. There are some words he comes across that he's not familiar with which is completely understandable. This isn't a book for a 12 year old. It truly explains the concept of time travel not as a fantasy but as what you would have to do in order to achieve such a goal.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I prefer this book slightly more than Brian Clegg's book by the same title. It introduces an essentially scientific view of time travel, and in that respect is easily imitated, and not entirely without merit. I found the content, because of the scientific view, somewhat boring and familiar.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Those with a theoretical interest in time travel will appreciate Davies' attention to explaining in detail the intricate theory behind the components of time travel. I think the real winner though will be the engineer with a slant toward the practical application side. Davies' presents a potential design (complete with flow diagram!) of the process steps needed to construct a time machine. Theories of black holes, worm holes, gravity, anti-gravity, causality etc. are presented in crisp yet coherent detail.
As a literary style, I at first didn't care for the many cartoon type drawings which decorate nearly a quarter of the book, but as it went on I realized that not only where they illustrative to the the book's finer details, but also a symbol for the fanciful possiblity of time travel. Reader's with further interest will also appreciate the detailed bibliography.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

How to Build a Time Machine
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: How to Build a Time Machine