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The Butterfly's Dream (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

October 31, 2013 | Format: MP3

$15.99
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4:30
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1:12
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2:30
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1:48
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1:43
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2:23
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4:35
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1:09
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0:52
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2:25
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0:47
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2:12
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By gwj on December 25, 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Very peaceful album.
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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
This soundtrack is as beautiful as the movie. It's a big reason the movie is so touching. It's a poem.
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Format: Audio CD
There aren’t many Turkish films which attain any sort of international prominence, but director Yılmaz Erdoğan’s film Kelebeğin Rüyası – The Butterfly’s Dream – is one of the rarities. It was Turkey’s official submission to the 86th Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film; according to its official press, the film is set in Turkey in the early 1940s, and revolves around two good friends, Rüştü Onur (Mert Firat) and Muzaffer Tayyip Uslu (Kıvanç Tatlıtuğ), who make a living out of publishing poetry. However, with World War II in full swing across the world, and with the social class system and religious barriers of the time giving rise to numerous problems, their story takes a turn when both fall in love.

Newcomer Rahman Altin won the Public Choice Award at the World Soundtrack Awards at the 40th Film Fest in Gent, Belgium for his score, and it’s not difficult to see why. Lyrical, passionate, and performed by a full orchestra, this music is a thematic, romantic delight. Much of the score is built around piano melodies; there’s a beautiful, solemn piano motif in the main theme, “The Butterfly’s Dream”, which gradually grows to encompass gentle flutes and a more prominent, grinding cello motif. Later, cues such as “Sea of Typewriters”, and “Picnic” continue the prominent piano performances, while others like “Wall of Poets” introduce a longing, searching solo violin that is just sublime. “To Istanbul” makes excellent use of the full orchestra in one of the largest and lushest settings of the main theme, while “Coalmine” is much darker and more tension-filled.
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Format: Audio CD
The Butterfly’s Dream is a stunning film about two poor poets living in Turkey at the start of World War II. Their life journey finds them both diagnosed with tuberculosis, and both falling in love with women in their lives. This very much mirrors their poetic view of life and love. The film is stunningly acted, shot, written, edited, directed and scored. It’s a film that calls back to the golden age of Hollywood with a story that is truly universal, and a true story at that. Composer Rahman Altin scored this moving film, and his music was the heart and soul of it. The score was the perfect accompaniment to the narrative, and it painted a rich organic human story underneath it. The score is a masterful one, and it’s a musical body of work that establishes Rahman Atlin as one of the best musical storytellers working today.

The somber opening of the score is a perfect way to establish the lives and times of our characters. We are also introduced to the central theme, which is present throughout the score. What the music immediately does is establish the fluttering love of live that our main protagonists share. And that’s one thing about the characters and the music that I love so much. Despite hard times and uncertain futures, the characters and the music never lose this love of life. The beauty and pure innocence of the characters are always there, and that’s reflected musically. Then there’s the love side of the film, and there are journeys of love here. The warmth and nurturing aspect of love is matched with a playfulness as well. But the score never becomes overly sentimental or saccharine. And while you feel this constant passion for love and life in the music, you are also presented with times of pain and tragedy.
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