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Bye Bye Brazil

4.1 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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(Apr 17, 2007)
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Editorial Reviews

DRAMA ON DVD

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: José Wilker , Betty Faria, Fábio Júnior
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: Portuguese
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    R
    Restricted
  • Studio: New Yorker
  • DVD Release Date: April 17, 2007
  • Run Time: 110 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000NHG7D4
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #144,024 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Bye Bye Brazil" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: VHS Tape
This film is a fascinating tour of a quickly disappearing Brazil. It is a wonderful way to explore the fifth largest nation in land area in the world. A group of traveling entertainers just barely making their living (often supplemented by the prostitution of the woman character known as the "Queen of the Rhumba") by traveling from one backwoods town to the next. The journey starts in the very dry region in northeast Brazil where the troupe picks up two young "hicks" and extends into the jungles of the Amazon. The entire troupe, however, is somewhat gullible because they do not realize how their backwoods Brazil is disappearing as television and major highways unite almost all the country's diverse regions into a modern Brazil. We witness the troupe's surprise and disgust as they move from one part of Brazil to another.
The journey is a sad one as it in part traces the ecological damage being done to Brazil by rapid industrialization and the damage done to the small backwoods towns and to the native Brazilians -- the "Indians." But it is always an interesting story because it also traces the emotional development of a young man with an obsessive love complex into a mature young family man. Dr. Patrick L. Cooney, Ph.D. sociology
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Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Who can save the rainforest? An environmentalist? A politician? A magician? A saint? It's none other than Gypsy Lord himself (comic genius Jose Wilker of Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands) a character born of Fellini, Brecht, and, of course, Brazil Beautiful. But, hey, wait a minute! Gypsy Lord doesn't want to save anything. He's wants to strike it rich.

Bye Bye Brazil is Carlos Diegues's 1979 metaphorical goodbye to a country in the process of extinction. Exotic, exuberant, and often very moving, it is a mixture of primitivism and progress, social commentary dressed up as a comic bon voyage to old Brazil (and Old World entertainment) where TV, sex, disco and booze are fast squeezing out the simple miracles of life. Beautifully directed by Diegues and with music by Chico Buarque, Caravan Rolidei with its festively painted 2 ton truck rolls across the backlands of Brazil capturing real people and places of the time. Be amazed as Gypsy Lord makes it snow so Brazil is just like all the great first world nations. Listen as he reassures the poor campesinos that there is a place where it's always green and the young never lose their strength. In the end Gypsy Lord and Salome the Rhumba Queen (who, Ladies and Gentlemen, has slept with American Presidents!) drive off to Altamira as the sun rises yet again on command. Para Vigo Me Voy!
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Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
If you enjoy road movies, such as Fellini's La Strada or Leningrad Cowboys Go America, then be sure to see this one. It's a real travelogue, that takes you through Brazil's back roads and small rural villages. This travelling circus troope has to venture ever farther into the vast country's hinterlands to escape from its most deadly enemy.

And what is that? The tv! Where they see the dreaded tv antennas, they know it's time to move on. So they do.

This is a very touching film about the trials and tribulations of being a travelling performer--a tough life, but one that they would never give up. I can't imagine any of these people holding down an ordinary job. So naturally, I came to empathize with them to a surprising degree. By the end, they all seemed like old friends of mine.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
BYE BYE BRAZIL is one of my favorite movies of all times. Remember that it was created during the Brazilian military dictatorship! It is light, comical, and magical. However, the traveling circus highlights many of the profound developmental and environmental problems that Brazil is facing - from poverty and drought in the Northeast, marine pollution, artisanal gold mining, deculturation of Amazonian indigenous peoples, tropical rainforest losses through road construction and colonization, among others. I also show this film to my class on "Latin America and the Environment".
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Format: DVD
The Brazil I lived in and loved during the sixties is vanishing. This film shows how and why.
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By Mark on July 21, 2016
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
My main reason for buying this film was to help me with learning Portuguese, and to immerse myself in Brazilian culture (my wife is Brazilian). I had read that this is considered one of the greatest Brazilian films of all time.

The movie is in Portuguese with optional English subtitles. Be warned, that there are a few scenes which are quite sexually explicit.

The plot takes place in the 1970s and follows a small traveling circus that has been very successful in poorer towns where there is not television. A poor accordionist and his pregnant wife join them. Soon, they begin losing a lot of business as most of the country is modernizing, and almost everyone is getting television, losing interest in circus shows. Without spoiling too much of the plot, I'll say that I really liked the ending, but the rest of the film was mediocre in my opinion. I'd say it's still worth the watch for those curious about Brazilian culture in 1970s and it's modernization, or those learning Portuguese.
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Format: DVD
Bye Bye Brasil (Carlos Diegues, 1979)

Roger Ebert gave out far more four-star reviews than I give five-star reviews (he rated on a four-star scale). I have always assumed this is because Ebert saw more movies in a year than I see in five, and had been doing it for decades longer by the time I started being a critic. But four-star films was still a pretty small ratio to all films, and also still, some of the films to which he gave four stars I find utterly mystifying. The most recent befuddling Ebert four-star pick to cross my eyes is Carlos Diegues' 1979 absurdist drama Bye Bye Brasil. I've seen the film referred to as Bergmanesque; I didn't get that at all. To me, there's an aspirant-Jodorowsky feel to the movie, but Diegues (Orfeu) doesn't delve as far into the magical-realist world as does Jodorowsky, nor are his characters as finely-honed; I get the feeling often, watching this, that Diegues wanted his characters to be as nuts as those in El Topo (or, with the benefit of hindsight, Santa Sangre), but that he was also trying to keep one foot firmly grounded in the real world. That's a delicate balance. To Ebert, obviously, and other reviewers who sing the film's praises, Diegues managed that balance well. I didn't think so.

Plot: Ciço (Fábio Júnior in his only feature appearance; he has been working steadily in television since the early seventies) is young, footloose, and stuck with his family and pregnant wife Dasdô (Kabbalah's Zaira Zambelli) on a rural Brazilian dust farm.
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