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C++ in a Nutshell 1st Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0596002985
ISBN-10: 059600298X
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ray Lischner began his career as a software developer, but dropped out of the corporate rat race to become an author. He started using C++ in the late 1980s, working at a company that was rewriting its entire product line in C++. Over the years, he has witnessed the evolution of C++ from cfront to native compilers to integrated development environments to visual, component-based tools. Ray has taught C++ at Oregon State University. He is the author of Delphi in a Nutshell and O'Reilly's upcoming C++ in a Nutshell, as well as other books.

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Product Details

  • Series: In a Nutshell (O'Reilly)
  • Paperback: 704 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1st edition (April 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 059600298X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596002985
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #431,577 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By John Osborn on July 15, 2002
Format: Paperback
I'm the publisher of "C# in a Nutshell" and given my admitted interest in the success of this book I would not ordinarily post a comment in this space. However, a previous reviewer suggests that we should have stated more explicitly which .NET namespaces and types the book covers and explained
the rationale behind our decisions. He also faults us for omitting a number of important namespaces, including System.Web and System.Remoting.
If this view is widely shared, then clearly we need to add such information to the next edition. But since a revision lies somewhere in the future, for those of you considering purchase of "C# in a Nutshell" today, here are some answers.
First, the complete list of the 22 .NET Framework namespaces documented in the 450-page "C# in a Nutshell" API Quick Reference is a follows:
Microsoft.Win32
System
System.Collections
System.Collections.Specialized
System.Diagnostics
System.Globalization
System.IO
System.IO.Isolated
System.NET
System.NET.Sockets
System.Reflection
System.Reflection.Emit
System.Runtime.InteropServices
System.Runtime.Serialization
System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters
System.Text
System.Text.RegularExpressions
System.Threading
System.Timers
System.Xml
System.Xml.XPath
System.Xml.XSL
These namespaces comprise more than 700 types, and thousands of members, which are listed in a quick-lookup format that complements, we believe, the syntax used by the official Microsoft documentation.
O'Reilly customers who have purchased "Java in a Nutshell" or other Nutshell titles already know that the series aims to provide experienced professionals with usable quick references that are reasonably complete, but not exhaustive.
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Format: Paperback
This is an excellent reference designed to give you precise definitions and usage for the C++ language features and library according to the C++ Standard. Unless you are a novice, it will save you time. In the past, when I needed to lookup something, I used to gladly dive into the Stroustrup's "C++ Programming Language" or Josuttis's "The C++ Standard Library". While indispensable and authoritative, these volumes are *NOT* designed for easy reference work; reading them takes time, and what should have been a 30-second lookup inevitably turned into a 30-minute reading. The "C++ In A Nutshell" helps to solve this problem, in addition to putting all the relevant resources at your fingertips in one volume.
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Format: Paperback
Most of the "reference" books I've seen for C++ have been more advanced primers (lippman/lajoie, pratta, josuttis). This is the first book I've seen for someone who knows C++, has been using it for some time, and needs a library and language reference. A welcome addition to my desk, especially since I learned C++ in 1992 and sometimes still need a gentle push away from archaic usage.
The language reference is concise but appears complete, and I disagree with the reviewer who said it is poorly organized (the library reference is alphabetical by library, the language reference follows the same convention everyone else does: Basics,Declarations,Expressions,Statements,Functions,Classes,Templates,I/O,Containers). The library reference is very, very valuable, often providing usage and code snippets as well as syntax.
This won't replace all the books on your shelf (you do have Effective C++ and More Effective C++, right?) but it will be a well used reference if you are a professional software guy (or faking it).
Comment 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
The Nutshell series published by the O'Reilly group has become so ubiquitous in the IT world that it needs very little introduction. As the preface of C# in a Nutshell states, the aim of the series is to become the desktop reference for whatever technology is covered by each book. In this case, O'Reilly aims to make this book the must-have reference for all C# programmers. This review will focus on the points that any good reference book should address, namely: brevity, completeness, correctness, and usefulness. Unfortunately, my own personal knowledge of C# is restricted to what was discussed in .NET Essentials (another O'Reilly publication), so I won't be able to be as critical of the correctness as I would like. My conclusions are thus based on short tests that I ran to check the validity of the claims made in the book.
C# in a Nutshell scores high marks in both the brevity and correctness categories. Humorous as it might be to label an 830-page book as brief, it actually qualifies as such. The main discussion of the language is kept to the first 270 pages, with an average of about 20 pages devoted to each subject. Only the essentials are discussed, and that will usually be enough when you need to quickly look up how to do something. The remaining 560 pages are devoted to a Quick Reference of the .NET framework classes. While reading the text, I never came across any glaring inconsistencies, such as conflicting descriptions of how to accomplish a task, which leads me to suspect that the text is mostly correct. The few actual tests I ran worked as expected. On a superficial level, I found the content credible.
When it came to completeness, I wasn't as impressed. As a reader, I have somewhat of a personal bias: I'm pretty familiar with both C++ and Java.
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