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A Caddy for Daddy

4.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Audio CD, July 16, 1990
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Editorial Reviews

jazz, bebop, hard bop, post bop, cool, hip, quintet, hank mobley, lee morgan
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
9:24
Album Only
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30
9:45
Album Only
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30
7:13
Album Only
4
30
7:15
Album Only
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30
6:14
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 16, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Blue Note Records
  • ASIN: B000005HD3
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #299,689 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
As with many of Hank Mobley's early-mid '60s Blue Note recordings, this effort leads off with the Rumproller-like title cut. What follows is a near ode to John Coltrane, the wonderfully haunting "The Morning After", augmented by Curtis Fuller's trombone. This and the fact that the pianist McCoy Tyner, who had recently split from the expanded classic Coltrane group, appears ought to arouse one's curiosity. But the tenor sax solo on "The Morning After" is no mere imitation - and, indeed, nothing of Mobley's ever is. The recording careens with Wayne Shorter's "Venus Di Mildew" evoking the feel produced in three of the group members' Blakeyan bands of the previous decade. Mobley flashes his adept songwriting skills in the last two numbers, the tricky "Ace Deuce Trey" (Mobley also keeps his string of great song-titles intact) and the closer, the avant-hard bop "3rd Time Around." Both songs cook. This is the sound of Hank Mobley in his mid-thirties, simultaneously honing and evolving his simmering tone and sound while showing his keen awareness of the changes that had swept through jazz by the time of this recording in late 1965. Tyner, Fuller and Mobley join the usual brand of high achievers, ever-steady Bob Cranshaw on bass, the joyous and bouncy Billy Higgins on drums and, naturally, Lee Morgan, the great trumpeter, to produce five lithe pieces that will swing forever. Hank Mobley isn't generally viewed as a great innovator, but a listener can hear him responding, in his own voice, to the rapidly changing musical form with an always listenable, rolling harmonic style; in other words, one can hear him aiming and hitting his mark. This CD is a rollicking, more risk-taking companion to the equally recommended "Dippin'", recorded earlier that year. With Hank Mobley's posthumous star growing brighter, it's no wonder his recordings seem more prescient now than ever.
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Format: Audio CD
This album presents a number of top muicians associated with Blue Note at the top of their form on a blowing date. Consequently, it is oriented more toward great playing than complex compositions -- although the compositions themselves are nothing to sneeze at. The result is a collection of cuts that feature really confident, inventive jazz playing by true masters. Rarely did Lee Morgan take better solos on record than he did here. McCoy Tyner is luminous, creative and articulate and Billy Higgins swings throughout in his own inimitable, buoyant way. This is a special and underappreciated album that should be heard more widely.
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By Calvin on September 14, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This cd is one of the few combinations of this dynamic duo. By duo I'm refering to the great Hank Mobley and the delightful Lee Morgan. I actucally purchased the cd because I'm a Lee Morgan fan. The combination of both these remarkable jazz greats is uncanny and unparalleled. You have to listen to the album to hear what I mean . Track #2, "The Morning After" is a masterfull flow of genius, demonstrated by both Morgan and Mobley. They simultaneously create a perfect rapture of Saxaphone and Trumpet on this selection that can never be recreated. This cd is a must, in order to complete the collection of any true jazz lover. None can compare with this combination of both Sax and Trumpet, except maybe when Miles Davis played with John Coltrane. Please see for yourself!
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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
Another Brother from the Big Band era who did not get his just kudos what a true talent
you are truly missed my Brother RIP. A gem and an era gone by. RIP my Big Band Family.
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