Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Calculus with Differential Equations (9th Edition) 9th Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 70 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0132306331
ISBN-10: 0132306336
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Trade in your item
Get a $24.19
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Rent On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$28.77 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$84.93 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
14 New from $149.02 66 Used from $80.92
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 880 pages
  • Publisher: Pearson; 9 edition (April 20, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0132306336
  • ISBN-13: 978-0132306331
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 1.3 x 10.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #258,830 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By R. Martin on August 23, 2006
Format: Hardcover
There are two types of electronic suppliments that come with this book. One is MyMathLab and the other is MathXL. The geniuses at Pearson decided to make them completely incompatible. So, if you get one code, it won't work with the other system.

Geniuses.

The ISBN for MathXL is: 0-13-142924-8

The ISBN for MyMathLab is: 0-13-230811-8
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I teach Calculus at the University of Utah and since two of the
reviews so far are specifically from students at my University I
decided to add my own view. (Note that I'm speaking strictly for
myself, not for my department or my colleagues, although I have no
reason to expect that they would seriously disagree.) We have used
this book and its predecessors for many years, and I like it because
it has just the right mix of applications and mathematical depth and
rigor. It has clear exposition and explanations, it does not take
shortcuts or dilute the material, it offers many excellent examples
and exercises, it is short (compared with other Calculus texts), and
it is essentially error free. The steps in the explanations are of
the size and kind that we expect our students to be able to follow or
figure out. In general, learning mathematics is a slow process.
There is no quick way to understand a new body of mathematics.
Working through any textbook at the current frontier of your
understanding is going to require a substantial amount of work. But
you want to learn not just Calculus, or how to solve certain types of
problems, you want to learn how to figure things out. You can do this
only by actually engaging in the process of figuring things out. As
part of this effort you want learn how to acquire new understanding by
working through difficult material. So if you have trouble
understanding this textbook I recommend that you stick with it and
talk with your instructor. Working through the textbook may take
initial effort but once you get into it will become easier, although
perhaps it will never become easy.
Read more ›
1 Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on September 6, 1999
Format: Hardcover
It's hard to believe that this puzzling, error-filled book is in its 7th edition.
I've been using the book for two semesters in a distance learning program. In this setting, where the reader needs to learn from the book rather than from an instructor, the book is inadequate. It's single strength - brevity - doesn't make up for its weaknesses: mystifying explanations, worked examples that omit important steps, and errors. Many times, this book made me laugh out loud when, after literally hours of effort, I finally understood what the authors were trying to communicate. There is no way I could have completed my classes had I not had Swokowski to refer to.
Beyond these weaknesses, the book is loaded with throw-away Horatio Algerisms ("Skill at this, like most worthwhile activities, depends on practice.") and hokey humor ("We have no desire to let this text suffer from the standard ailment of older texts, called `revisionitis.'") These give the book a dated, musty feel: it's as if you are looking back at how calculus used to be taught 40 years ago.
Finally, six weeks into the first semester, the binding failed, converting the book into an expensive, 900-page, loose-leaf folder. Overall, not a book I enjoyed spending time with.
3 Comments 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Textbook Binding
I am in something of a unique position to critique this book. You see, I have, due to the fact that I attended different schools and therefore had different teachers for Calculus I, II, and III, been forced to buy three different ... calculus textbooks.
I feel that this book in many ways is the best. Keep in mind, however, that this isn't saying much. For the most part, calculus (and math in general) textbooks are somewhat difficult to learn from. This stems from the fact that we students like to see lots of worked out example in order to "get" it (buy Schaum's outline or REA's Problem Solver for lots of worked examples). In many cases, a calculus book like this will give you, perhaps, one example for a given procedure and leave it to you to deduce the rest.
Still, I like the fact that this book contains the material for Calc. I, II, and III. If nothing else, it saves us some money.
One final comment: as another reviewer on amazon has already noted, the binding on this book is quite poor. I have seen many other students in my class with books in which the pages have started falling out. Perhaps Prentice Hall should provide us with a better binding for a hundred bucks.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Textbook Binding
This is a good book for calculus. I usually go to class and do not undestand the professor because he speaks a different language then come home and figure it out from the book. The solutions manual is a must have for this course unless you have an excellent teacher or tudor. I find it helpful to check my problems half-way through completing them to make sure I am on the right track. And when I do not understand the text book instructions, the solutions manual usually puts me on track.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Textbook Binding
Ok, let me start by stating that because this is "the shortest mainstream calculus" text out there, it does _not_ mean this has less value. It would _seem_ to be so, but this is the exception to the rule where shorter texts means dumber texts.

Explaining mathematics is a bit of an art: you have to choose in what sequence things are to be layed out to the reader, so this means you have to choose how you will relate the explanations to one another. The Purcell I read (the 1st edition - it was my dad's) is quite masterfull at that. Often, when my college standard text got the explanations too verbose and confused, I looked for my Purcell copy and there it was, crystal clear: short, mathematically rigorous, to the point.

(I don't give 5s to any but very exceptional books)
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews