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Calculus, Single Variable 3rd Edition

2.2 out of 5 stars 49 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0471408253
ISBN-10: 0471408255
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Instructor's Manual with Sample Exam Questions, Instructor's Solution Manual, Student's Solution Manual, Instructor's Resource CD-ROM available. -- The publisher, John Wiley & Sons --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Continuing to provide calculus students with an introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts and an understanding of geometric and numerical reasoning, this second edition includes numerous changes. New sections consist of topics on parametric equations, ratio test, limits, differentiability, the definite integral and more. Also included are more easy to medium level problems in each section as well as a summary of the main points at the end of each chapter. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 640 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 3 edition (July 13, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471408255
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471408253
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 1 x 10.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #141,127 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on October 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
I cannot understand why at one time not to long ago this approach and this text were considered the way to go in math education. The explanations are unclear and often concepts are assumed before they are introduced. I tutor math at my university, and I have a terribe time trying to help tutor students in calculus because they're stuck with this abysmal book as a "guide." I would recommend the text by Zill if you can find it (it's out of print), but any other calculus text couldn't be worse than this one.
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Format: Paperback
I don't know why so many people dislike this book...I probably learn in a different manner than they do. I've had to learn most of my calculus through Stewart's Early Transcendentals book, which I found very dry and mostly uninteresting. Luckily, I bought this book while I was taking a year off and taught myself calculus, having never even heard of a limit or a derivative before.

If you like thinking about the ideas behind things, and then learning about the formalism and mathematics of it, then this book is for you. If you prefer proofs, analysis, and "learn these steps and solve these problems" examples, you'll probably want to find a different text.

I can remember, though, the JOY of actually deriving things for myself, like how to calculate the volume of a solid rotated about some line or some such nonsense, because I could understand exactly what was needed. That is how I would describe this book: It's not a book about proving theorems and making you memorize a bunch of rules. Instead, it makes you really understand the subject matter, so that you can use the ideas of calculus to solve a variety of problems, even if they're problems you have no idea how to solve when you first read through them!

That is one thing that this book taught me that I found indespensible. You don't have to know how to do something, because you might be able to figure it out yourself instead of having some professor or text book or internet article tell you how to! Perhaps this approach is a little too ambitious, and I'll admit I spent a lot of time going through this text trying to reason things out, but it was time well spent.
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By A Customer on February 15, 1999
Format: Paperback
This is the poorest calculus book I have ever had to work with. It gives poor explanations of the subject matter and the examples it offers provide no insight into how to use the thereoms of the section. The question are often esoteric and confusing. I feel that I have become stupider for having used this textbook.
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Format: Paperback
This is the book I used for my introductory sequence in calculus, and, unfortunately I also used the multivariable version for my vector calculus course. I cannot say enough bad things about this book! I can't believe that I have to give it even 1 star! I am a physics major, and although that may color my opinion, this book in no way prepares one for higher level mathematics. I found myself forced to review the concepts that I was supposed to have learned, such as Fourier series, and so forth. The only way that I was able to do calculus-based physics was by learning the applied mathematics from the physics text itself! Fortunately, I had a great professor for my single and multiple variable course (he hated the book, too!), and I was able to ace them, but it would have been easier without this book. Avoid it like the plague.
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Format: Hardcover
The cover is fitting, crash course into calculus. The book doesn't go through enough examples, what is there is poorly explained. As noted below, the corresponding answer guide doesn't even include all odds. Very glad only used at where I went to community college and the 4-year I now attend uses the vastly better James Stewart book.
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Format: Paperback
[EDIT] This review is for a previous version.

After reading the previous reviews, I would have to agree with many of them. However, I think I should explain in detail what I feel is lacking. One important thing to note is that I am writing about the first edition.

First: The authors introduce the concept of the derivative _before_ the concept of a limit? Excuse me? Which is more fundamental, and should be introduced first? The author just uses the word limit before defining it. A no-no in mathematics. The concept of a limit is the most important in calculus and absolutely foundational to the rest of the subject.

Second: Even worse than the first complaint: the author never even gives the delta-epsilon definition of a limit! This is not optional! Especially for students going on to Calc 3 and Real Analysis, they must have exposure to delta-epsilon proofs. It took me that many different exposures just to get it!

Third: the authors noted in their introductions (I always read introductions to books: gives you their philosophy), they mention that the book, the way they wrote it, helps students with weak algebra backgrounds. Forgive me for being hard-nosed, but I would say that students with weak algebra backgrounds ought to strengthen their algebra before tackling calculus! It's hard enough with an adequate background! Mathematics is hopelessly cumulative, and going on without thorough mastery of previous concepts is foolhardy.

It seems to me that the most logical development in calculus is the following: functions, limits, derivatives, integrals. The author has not followed this arrangement.

To its credit, however: the author reviews functions in chapter 1.
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