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Comment: Exlibrary softcover book in good condition with some wear throughout. Has all usual library markings & stickers. Curled corners on cover
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It Came from del Rio (Bunnyhead Chronicles) Paperback – October 22, 2010

4.9 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

a pitch-perfect noir tale of love and revenge -- Denver Post
 
a tale that packs in the thrills of the best outdoor adventure novels with enough bizarre creature encounters to fill an entire season of The X-Files -- Chizine
 
fun, yes because there is indeed a bunny-headed chupacabra shepherd zombie, but also because he makes it real -- 3AM Magazine
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Stephen Graham Jones is the author of thirteen novels, four collections, and two novellas. He does horror and literary, thriller and science fiction. Most recent are The Least of My Scars, Zombie Sharks with Metal Teeth, and Flushboy. Up in 2014 are Not for Nothing, STATES OF GRACE (SpringGun Press, 2014), The Gospel of Z, and the YA novel Floating Boy Meets the Girl Who Couldn't Fly (with Paul Tremblay). Stephen's had some hundred and seventy stories published, from Alaska Quarterly Review to Weird Tales, from Asimov's to Prairie Schooner. His stories have been picked up for the The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror, The Best Horror of the Year volumes 2 and 3, The Year's Best Dark Fantasy and Horror (2010, 2011, and 2012), and Dzanc's Best of the Web 2010. He's also been in a lot of anthologies (The Weird, Creature, Zombies, Heroics, Ghosts, more) and some textbooks (Writing Fiction, Behind the Short Story, Architectures of Possibility). Stephen's books have been finalists for the Bram Stoker Award, three Shirley Jackson Awards, the Colorado Book Award, and he's won the Texas Institute of Letters Award for Fiction, the This is Horror "Novel of the Year," the Independent Publisher's Award for Multicultural Fiction, and he's been an NEA fellow in fiction. Stephen earned his Ph.D. from Florida State University. He lives in Boulder, Colorado.
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Product Details

  • Series: Bunnyhead Chronicles
  • Paperback: 212 pages
  • Publisher: Trapdoor Books (October 22, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936500019
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936500017
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #756,605 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Richard Thomas on November 24, 2010
Format: Paperback
( This review was originally published at at The Nervous Breakdown: [...]

Once Stephen Graham Jones has you, once you're invested, and want to see what's going to happen next, that's when he elevates his game. He's one of those rare authors (like Brian Evenson, William Gay and Cormac McCarthy) that can write, and publish, and exist in two worlds: the land of genre fiction, with the horrific, the fantastic; and also the high towers of the academic, the language and focus raised to a literary intelligence, the lyrical voice an evolution, the poetic unfurling of the land and emotion beyond the typical read. Jones can publish in the dark recesses of Cemetery Dance and Asimov's just as easily as the literary landscape of Black Warrior Review and Southeast Review, or the contemporary hotbeds of Juked and Hobart.

It Came From Del Rio (Trapdoor Books) is not your typical chupacabra story. And how often do you hear that? Maybe you're still eating candy from Halloween, a bit of the macabre lingering in your flesh and bones. Or maybe you just enjoy a pulpy novel, something that grabs you by the shoulders and doesn't let go. Either way, It Came From Del Rio is a book that I knew I wanted to read, having been a long time fan of Jones, committed to his work since the haunting, innovative serial killers in All The Beautiful Sinners (Rugged Land) melted my brain back in 2003. As the blurbs on the back of the book from two of the best in contemporary neo-noir (Craig Clevenger and Will Christopher Baer) state, "...Jones crosses into the noir badlands..." and writes a book that "...anyone else would have rendered as kitsch.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Wow! The narrative prose in this book enthralled me. I would read certain parts several times, savoring the words, studying the style. The story was wonderful and full of twists and turns that kept me reading to see how it would all come out in the end. The author made the setting come to life--the smells, the sights, the sounds. The concept was fresh and fun, the story mesmerizing. I look forward to reading more from Stephen Graham Jones!
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I've heard Jones name more and more decided to start to see what the hype is and yeah, he can really write an original interesting story. This book is like nothing else I have ever read and can't wait to start reading all his other books now!
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Format: Paperback
This "little book" is going to sneak up and devour people in giant incisor bites. Easily one of the most cool,fun, perfectly written books I've read in a while. In a lesser writer's hands, this story could have drifted away, but with It Came from Del Rio, Stephen Graham Jones wrangles it all together, delivering a novel that blurs the line between comic book aficionado and "serious" reader. Effortlessly. In truth, this book should have both of these type of readers either high-fiving or fighting for fan ownership, or both. Everyone wins.

A man with a mission, a daughter with a past, but also bloody boots, clairvoyant cows, space rocks, and the rabbits you might only see through a South Texas heat mirage, It Came from Del Rio goes many places.

Part modern western, part tabloid fairy tale (with teeth), all heart, Jones tells a story that, at it's core, is the journey of a father and daughter, making choices and doing what they must in order to keep their lives moving. Lost and found, the characters kick the dust down unmarked roads and leap over fences, the "goal" always a constant. Jones is in complete control of this ride, fluidly shifting gears around love and survival, fringe myth, and the relationships that keep feet moving across every border.

I might be wrong, but I think it's all true.

Anyone familiar with Jones' work will know that the prose will play a big role in telling the story. They will also know that his work can range from the geek-horror-cool of Demon Theory, to the vivid characters and FBI reality of All The Beautiful Sinners. There is a wide range of thought and storytelling on display in those novels.
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Format: Paperback
Forgetting the fact that everything I've read from SGJ was exceptionally great, I would want to read, It Came from Del Rio for the cover alone. It reminds me of a comic book cover, one that would have come from something like DC's Vertigo line, not from the standard super hero books. And because of this cover I expected a crazy horror, slasher novel, or something close. But I've read SGJ before, so why would I even think that.
We begin with the story of Dodd, a fugitive hiding out in Mexico with his young daughter, Laurie. Dodd transports things across the border for the right amount of money, and he's really good at it. Only one day a job comes up that is quite out of the ordinary. Dodd gets put into a situation where he doesn't have a choice whether or not to take this job, that choice has been made for him. With the end of this job comes the end of the first half of the book. The second half picks up fifteen years later, with Laurie as an adult and a member of The Border Patrol. She has a new life, but she has never forgotten the one she had as a child, living in Mexico with her dad. And then the killings start.
This book is written like journal entries, the first half from the perspective of Dodd, the second from Laurie. In less capable hands this could have been a disaster, but thankfully we have Stephen Graham Jones at the helm. And to touch on what I mentioned earlier this book wasn't anything like I expected. What I enjoyed the most was the early relationship between Dodd and Laurie, and how it made me feel for the little girl when her father left for that last job. That right there is why SGJ is a master at the written word, he creates real characters, ones that you care about, and feel for.
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