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Capital Crimes Hardcover – April 27, 1996

2.6 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Hardcover, April 27, 1996
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Blue Moon: Mundy's Landing Book Two by Wendy Corsi Staub
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Within the first few pages of Sanders's disappointing 20th novel, we are introduced to a latter-day Rasputin--a wild-eyed, lustful "holy man" who preaches out of a ramshackle barn in Virginia--and have had a glimpse of his kinky sexual practices. Then we are privy to a discussion among the U.S. president's key staff members, who deliberate whether the Chief Executive and the First Lady might be heading for mental breakdowns because of their concern for their only son, a hemophiliac. The pace of this derivative thriller slackens thereafter, as these two plot threads become entwined. Brother Kristos, as the mysterious faith healer has christened himself, soon has the First Couple--and a goodly segment of official Washington's womenfolk--under his considerable spell. John Tollinger, an ex ecutive assistant to the White House chief of staff, is assigned to expose Kristos as a charlatan--not an easy task, given the man's apparent ability to see both the hidden past and unknown future of many of those he meets. It is all most improbable, even in an era when presidents consult astrologers, and the ending rings false, rendering this one of Sanders's least effective efforts. Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club alternates.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Fascinating...suspenseful!" -- Los Angeles Times

"Sanders is always good." -- Chicago Tribune

"Sanders' plot is fast forward...A cautionary tale." -- New York Daily News

"Sanders' plot is fast forward...A cautionary tale." (New York Daily News -- New York Daily News --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Random House Value Publishing (April 27, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0517169223
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517169223
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.5 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,920,860 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on June 21, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book appears to me to be an almost exact copy of the story of Rasputin. He came from a religious background, faith healer, heavy drinker, seducer of women. Helped the Czar's son who had the same blood disease. Was poisoned, shot then drowned by a close associate of the Czar. This author took the Rasputin story and moved it from Russia to the United States and moved the time frame from the early 1900's to the late 1900's. My rating is low because it appears to me that the author did not give credit for his source of the plot.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Having read 18 of Sanders' books to date, I enjoyed "Capital Crimes" more than most of his works and as much as the "Deadly Sins" series. It moved quickly and was difficult to put down. "Caper" reads in a similar fashion to "Capital Crimes" and I would recommend either book.
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Format: Hardcover
I liked Capital Crimes by Lawrence Sanders, published in 1989 in hardcover first edition by G.P. Putnam and Sons. The novel is the second Sanders' novel I've read (the first being The Fourth Deadly Sin, published in 1984 by Putnam). Because both novels were good reads, I am fast becoming a Lawrence Sanders fan.

Capital Crimes is all about mixing politics and religion together on the national scene. Jacob Everard Christiansen a.k.a. Brother Kristos is an itinerant preacher thought by President Abner Hawkins and First Lady Helen Hawkins to be a clairyoyant and a miracle worker/healer (capable of healing the couple's only offspring, hemophilic son George). Brother Kristos has long hair, a beard, wears a robe made out of burlap, and speaks to his followers from a rundown barn he owns located 1.5 hours south of Washington DC in Virginia. Kristos claims to be Christ's brother. He drinks vodka in excess and is a sexual satyr. As the President's faith in Kristos grows, so does Kristos personal wealth and his desire to influence the President in matters of policy, not involving the health of the President's son. Throw into the mix: a power-hungry, president-bashing Vice President; a Vice Presidential assistant selling low-grade secrets to the Russians; the Russian spy buying the secrets; a far-too-serious executive assistant to the White House Chief; and a reformed alcoholic, former-FBI agent turned detective, hired (by the executive assistant) to dig up dirt on Brother Kristos.

Brother Kristos reminded me of the messiah-like Valentine Michael Smith found in Robert Heinlein's 1961 novel "A Stranger in A Strange Land," and the charismatic preacher found in John Farris' 1967 novel "King Windom.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Brother Kristos claims to be the brother of Jesus, preaches faith, practices faith healing, and seems to be able to read minds and tell the future. He comes to the notice of the First Family, and seems to miraculously heal the President's son. Soon Brother Kristos is influencing policy and making staff members and party leaders very, very nervous about the lessening separation of church and state. Various plots are hatched to dispatch Kristos by various means.
Brother Kristos appears to be a huckster, but he's also done some things that are hard to explain logically or scientifically. Whether he's really got some kind of supernatural power is also of interest to the players. The plot is interesting enough, and I was sufficiently curious about the answer to this question, as well as the rest of the surrounding intrigue. Unfortunately, I cannot say that I connected with any of the characters. It was almost impossible to find someone to root for, as everyone had something disgusting about his or her character. I was especially repulsed by the scenes of Brother Kristos having sexual relations with various women. I was disappointed by the ending as well, as I felt there were several loose ends remaining. I was mildly captivated while reading it and found it hard to put down, but I currently feel like it was kind of a waste of time.
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