Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Capital in the Twenty First Century
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Showing 1-10 of 240 reviews(1 star). Show all reviews
on August 8, 2016
Nope[...] and nope [...]
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on June 9, 2016
This whole book was written with one assumption in mind: that inequality is bad and we should avoid at all costs. Nowhere however does Piketty bring arguments in favor of his assumption. Instead he embarks the reader on a merry ride full of statistics that are either fake or very subjective in nature, conclusions sometimes contradicted by the very data he brings in to support his claims and solutions that were to be implemented would doom any country to poverty and constant unrest.
22 comments| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on June 4, 2016
Unreadable. I am not alone. Maybe the most unread book ever, but one that the pretentious worldwide pretend to read. [...]
11 comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on May 19, 2016
Would not recommend even if you're an economist...
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 17, 2016
There's always been a problem for English language readers attempting to read, let alone stay awake or even understand, books originally written in French. There have been a few that really take a great deal of effort to follow, only to realize at the end of the day that you've gone around in circles and what was stated in 20 pages could have been done in 2 or 3.
I picked up this book following all the hype about how "revolutionary" the book is on TV and the NY Times best sellers list.
This book is also one of Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner's favorites, and heavily quoted by her on an interview with an American reporter last year.
This is one of those celebrated works that fill up libraries, and generate years of man-hour discussions at cafes, socialist websites, and bolivarian circles in the Americas. It is worth noting the historical trend of dictators - the ones that are somewhat literate - to "write" mountains of books in a concerted effort to appear knowledgeable to the masses: Lenin, Stalin, Mao, Castro, Kim Il Sung, as well as religious writers commenting volumes upon volumes on a source that is but a fraction of the size of their work.
This book is no different. A lot has been said and written about nothing more than a tax on wealth; which is nothing new, and most likely not to occur in this century unless the world experiences another World War and the cost of rebuilding nations would justify such a tax, which at some point after reconstruction, would become an impediment to further growth and progress - a very real situation that occurred in the UK from the end of WW2 to the time of Thatcherism.
0Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on February 17, 2016
Basic premise of the book is wrong. Return to capital does not grow faster than wages over the long term, and this can be proven by any rudimentary study of history spanning a long enough period of time.
44 comments| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Tons of fake data
33 comments| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 4, 2015
Crap.
11 comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on September 5, 2015
I wrote a 50-page respectful but in the end disappointed review of this brave but economically defective argument. Piketty doesn't know, for example, that if the price of something (oil, housing, whatever) rises, people will enter the business of supplying it. Ec 1. And he focuses on relative inequality when the problem is absolute poverty. And his belief that the rich always get relatively richer is mistaken. And inequalioty has fallen, not risen, under "capitalism." And the poor have been enriched.
99 comments| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on August 8, 2015
This book is worse than Das Kapital by Karl Marx. At least Karl Marx wasn't so intellectually dishonest as to say, "Oh, bytheway, all this stuff I'm going on about doesn't apply to British capitalism," like Piketty says his book doesn't apply to American Capitalism. Even Krugman pointed out what he called "intellectual slight-of-hand." Of course Krugman being who he is, he went on to say this dishonesty doesn't lesson the thesis. If you want an actual review by someone who read the ENTIRE book, follow the link below.

Besides the fundamental stupidity that a thesis like this has exceptions in certain countries, there is the short-sighted ignorance of the fact that as a the capitalist increases his or her capital, the more tools the worker will have at his disposal, making him more productive and therefore worth a higher wage. The disparity between CEO's and laborers doesn't remain constant ad infinitum. This fact strikes at the heart of Piketty's claim that the wage disparity between the capitalist and the laborer leads to something "potentially terrifying."

http://consultingbyrpm.com/blog/2014/06/full-review-of-pikettys-capital-in-the-21st-century.html
55 comments| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse