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Showing 1-10 of 1,199 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 1,816 reviews
on September 16, 2017
Great Book!! Love this Book!!!
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on June 20, 2014
This is an important book. Recent research tracing controlling interests in the multi-national corporations demonstrates a concentration of ownership amongst a relatively small number of firms of most of the worlds wealth. Piketty's research uses a different set of data sources to take this further - concentration of wealth is increasing and economic inequality is returning to levels last seen in Europe's Belle Époque and America's Gilded Age. We are headed toward a new era of "patriarchal capitalism" in which a small number of rich and powerful family dynasties control the world.

Piketty suggests potential solutions including a global wealth tax to help regulate the operation of capitalism.
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on June 19, 2014
This book is very well-written with easy to understand concepts and graphic explanations. Recently I conversed with an obviously erudite woman who complained that she didn't like graphs and was put off by this book as a result. If graphs don't excite you, and they don't excite me either, Piketty's are merely in the book as an illustration of his written points so you do not necessarily need to refer to them for understanding. I believe this is a very important work for anyone who is at all interested in historical world economics and how history has played a critical part in world economics today. I cannot think of anyone I know who would not appreciate what Thomas Piketty has written here.
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on August 20, 2014
Not for the average reader, but for one who has some level of college education or great grades in high school reading, Piketty offers a terrific review of economic theory as a balance critique of capitalism and its inherent weaknesses. I'd recommend it to anyone who wishes to challenged their previously unchallenged assumptions about how capitalistic societies work and what its strengths and weaknesses are from a well-researched study from a well-advanced economist in his (Piketty's) own right.
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on August 12, 2017
important reading, if a bit dry and too long
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on March 22, 2017
This is an informative and useful book that provides an in depth look at income distribution over the last couple of centuries. It is well researched and comprehensive in its scholarship. The detail provided causes it to be at times tedious but it is written in the manner of an academic work rather than a mass market work for popular consumption. The audio version is even more challenging because it does not provide access to the frequently referenced charts and graphs.

While this is a difficult book to read, it is not difficult to comprehend the essence of message presented. I recommend it with the advisory that it cannot be read in the manner of a popular novel. Take small bites and absorb what it has to say.
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on November 3, 2014
Has a lot of great data and facts. Excellent discussions of issues most don't deal with, but also 3 important flaws. 1) Too narrow view of "capital" ignoring social capital, human capital, and a large part of natural capital. This means overall evaluation of inequality of wealth is biased towards financial capital and constructed capital. 2) Error in estimating net worth of fiat sovereign governments because doesn't distinguish them from other Governments like those of the Eurozone. 3) Focuses only on tax remedies, not on large scale deficit spending directly creating jobs and expanding safety nets as a way of cutting inequality. He makes this last error because he ignores the expanded policy space fiat sovereigns have when compared with other Govs.
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on January 21, 2016
Very important, informative, sometimes droll, charmingly written but 4 times too long. The simple points that capital has always been concentrated in the hands of the few, and that only exception periods of growth or wars change the pattern does not need 700 pages.
Dr. R von Fuchs
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on September 16, 2017
This should be a textbook for Wall Street, not Ayn Rand.
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on October 30, 2014
The concepts of this book are not easy to understand fully. But sincerely recommend
to those who are interested in social stratification, the gap between poor and rich.
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