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Captain Britain TPB Paperback – February 1, 2002

4.4 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Paperback, February 1, 2002
$49.99 $39.94

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Comics (February 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785108556
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785108559
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.4 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #992,994 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Daniel V. Reilly VINE VOICE on November 21, 2002
Format: Paperback
As Author Alan Moore states in his introduction, the stories in this book are from VERY early on in the careers of himself and Artist Alan Davis, but they hold up remarkably well. The basic story will be familiar to longtime comic fans: Hero is thrown into an alternate reality, must face a megomaniacal madman, etc.; What's so cool about Captain Britain is that this story was published over TWENTY YEARS AGO, so all of the similar stories we're more familiar with (Crisis on Infinite Earths, X-Men's Days of Future Past, even Moore's & Davis'own Miracleman)had their genesis here.
The book gets off to a head-scratching start; We're thrown into the closing chapters of a long-running story-arc that Moore & Davis had the misfortune of inheriting, but they do an amazing job of not only making the complex story and characters accessible, but actually making them interesting. Moore starts by killing Captain Britain, and rebuilding him from the ground up, as he would later do with DC's Swamp Thing. By the third or fourth chapter, Moore & Davis have hit their stride, and are beginning to impart their own voices on the book. Part of the fun is seeing how fast Moore and Davis grow as creators; Moore learns that sometimes silence can be just as powerful as words, and Davis becomes a confident, masterful storyteller in his own right. By the time I finished the book, I felt like I had just discovered a long-hidden masterpiece. I don't know if this is the ENTIRE Moore/Davis Captain Britain run, but if it isn't, I hope Marvel gets the rest into print again FAST. Fans of Marvel's Excalibur series will also be interested to know that this book contains the first appearance of Meggan, The Captain's future love interest. There's also a cameo appearance by the aforementioned Miracleman.
While not Moore's best work, it's still head-and-shoulders above 90% of the material out there. Give it a try!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Captain Britain, the UK's preeminent superhero, is a bit of a self-righteous bloke. He's not the most cunning tool in the shed. There's no finesse to his game. He strikes at villainy with the subtlety of a blunt instrument. What makes his story fascinating are the characters with whom he rubs elbows and the very strange predicaments in which he lands. This is good news because Captain Britain, by himself, is a fairly dull character. But for a time, in the 1980s, Alan Moore (in previous stories) and Jamie Delano and Alan Davis (in this collection) collaborated and made the good Captain more relevant, made his adventures an absolute treat.

This trade paperback collects the Captain Britain bits from THE MIGHTY WORLD OF MARVEL #14-16, as well as CAPTAIN BRITAIN #1-14, stuff that were originally published in 1984 and '85. Chris Claremont writes the intro. Ian Rimmer, once editor to CAPTAIN MARVEL, writes the outro. And just so there's no confusion with that other trade that seems to share the same reviews, this graphic novel's cover presents the Captain and Meggan flying towards you on a yellow background. If you're any sort of fan of the Captain, then this run of issues is a must-have. Pertinent, life-changing stuff goes down in these pages. Continuity-wise, this volume picks up right after the reality-bending Jaspers' Warp saga. It finds Brian Braddock - the Captain's civilian identity - second-guessing himself.

Not that I follow Captain Britain that religiously, but even I recognize the seminal events in this trade. Early on we're introduced to the endearing were-creature Meggan and we track her evolution. How Meggan turns out - going from caterpillar to butterfly - provides one of this run's most wonderful moments.
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Format: Paperback
This one is a little rough around the edges, primarily because it's some of the earliest work available in paperback by Alan Moore or (to the best of my knowledge) Alan Davis. Also, the beginning of the story is a bit jarring, since we appear to be dropped into the middle of a tale begun by the previous creative team. But the story gets better as it goes along. The main character, Captain Britain, seems very dull to me, but some of the supporting characters, including the primary antagonist, are original enough to be interesting.
While Alan Davis's pencil work here isn't quite as smooth and proportional as it becomes later in his career, it's still pretty appealing.
Despite all the little criticisms above, I thought it was a very engaging comics story (once you get past the first three or four chapters) with a lot of energy and a quirky, "Dr. Who meets the Terminator" type feel to it. But before buying the book, take into account that this isn't really prime Alan Moore or prime Alan Davis.
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Good if you like bronze age stuff and heroes that are somewhat unusual- has somewhat of a British slant of course and a lot of it is an origin story- so if that's not your thing you can safely let this one go by.
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One of the best Marvel products ever. The Jasper's Warp is creepy, intriguing, and terrifying all at the same time. I do wish this story started earlier because you're pretty much jumping in the middle of things, but I don't think it's quite enough to lower the score.
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Format: Paperback
Alan Moore's forte, when one examines his work, is clearly not in the standard superhero fare category. He can work quite well within the superhero mold, however, as is evidenced by the perfect Watchmen miniseries. In Captain Britain, Moore manages to lighten to balance between his own artful world and common superheroes. In Watchmen, one can easily forget that the superheroes involved are the same type you'd find in JLA. In Captain Britain, its relatively standard Marvel superhero fare. The story, however, is riveting and far-reaching. Having little experience with Captain Britain, I found the beginning somewhat confusing, but that arc is ended quickly and within five pages another plot is developed. This book is recommended to any fans of Alan Moore, or Captain Britain, but it most likely holds little appeal for more recent comic readers.
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