Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Carjacked: The Culture of the Automobile and Its Effect on Our Lives 0th Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0230618138
ISBN-10: 0230618138
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$7.99 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$30.87 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
42 New from $6.99 58 Used from $0.01
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Excel2016ForDummiesVideo
Excel 2016 For Dummies Video Training
Discover what Excel can do for you with self-paced video lessons from For Dummies. Learn more.
$30.87 FREE Shipping. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Carjacked: The Culture of the Automobile and Its Effect on Our Lives
  • +
  • Car Cultures (Materializing Culture)
Total price: $68.82
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Americans’ infatuation with their cars is critiqued in this readable treatment. Replete with the ironic and irrational aspects of owning and driving cars, it partakes of car psychology to deliver its message about the statistical costs of four-wheeled freedom. Emphasizing the attachment of values such as personal independence to car ownership, not to mention self-image and status, Lutz and Fernandez cheerily saunter through automobile advertising and movies to show how mass media exploit people’s desire to buy cars. The authors offer many personal anecdotes about consumers’ experiences of the showdown in the automobile showroom as a narrative illustration of how people’s emotions battle it out with their finances in purchase decisions. Turning to life on the road, Lutz and Fernandez, relying on studies and interviews with about 100 drivers, look askance at public expenditure on automobile infrastructure, fractions of lives spent in cars––and lost in them by the tens of thousands annually. An agenda for personal and political action concludes the authors’ knowledgeable survey of car culture. --Gilbert Taylor

Review

“The authors capture the fantasy and reality of our love of cars.They hold up a mirror to we, 'the people,' to let us look at our individual and collective glamour and bloat. They ask, subtly and with a good amount of wit, if we know what we are doing to ourselves? You must read it to learn the answers, which might surprise you.” ―John Hofmeister, former president of Shell Oil, founder and CEO of Citizens for Affordable Energy and author of Why We Hate the Oil Companies

Carjacked should be required reading for anyone with a driver's license. It lays out the ways that bigger, faster and more plentiful cars on the road have altered America in dramatic way, influencing foreign policy, infrastructure investment, national health and personal wealth. If we wish to drive into a better future, rather than collide with it head on, it's time to address our addiction to the automobile - and this book is the perfect starting place.” ―Leigh Stringer, president of Advance Strategies and author of The Green Workplace

“Exceptionally well-researched and passionately, yet logically, argued, Carjacked will make you rethink your relationship not only with your car, but with the entire economic and physical infrastructure that has built up around it. While acknowledging our love of cars, it offers practical advice on how to ensure that the relationship is affordable, beneficial and sustainable, both for individuals and for society.” ―Cleo Paskal, Associate Fellow, Royal Institute of International Affairs and author of Global Warring

“Strongly recommended for all willing to consider that we need to ‘step away from the car.” ―Library Journal

“Knowledgeable survey of car culture.” ―Booklist

“Americans' infatuation with their cars is critiqued in this readable treatment. Replete with the ironic and irrational aspects of owning and driving cars, it partakes of car psychology to deliver its message about the statistical costs of four-wheeled freedom. Emphasizing the attachment of values such as personal independence to car ownership, not to mention self-image and status, Lutz and Fernandez cheerily saunter through automobile advertising and movies to show how mass media exploit people's desire to buy cars.” ―Booklist

“Authors Catherine Lutz and Anne Lutz Fernandez effectively and accessibly lay out the social, financial, historical, and of course, environmental impact of America's love affair with the internal combustion engine.” ―Planet Green

“Carjacked aims to answer certain questions that lie deep in our brains - the unnoticed, unremarked-upon equivalents of spare tires in trunks: Why do cars play such a central role in our lives" Are they really as essential as they seem? Is there a sager, saner way to live with the car and have the mobility we need?” ―Connecticut Post

“This need for a more balanced transportation environment also underscores Catherine Lutz's and Anne Lutz Fernandez's powerful and sobering Carjacked, which examines the many unanticipated consequences of car culture. No mere 'anti-car' manifesto, Carjacked is an anthropological study of what the authors refer to as the "car system," of which the automakers are merely one element...They have assembled a fascinating and disturbing portrait of something we accept as normal -- indeed essential -- but which has, in many ways, betrayed much of its original promise.” ―The Winnipeg Free Press

“Thought-provoking inquiry into the role of cars in our lives, most especially the suburban lifestyle that cars created. Their main conclusion is for Americans to examine how they use their cars as opposed to how they think they use them. In other words, to strip away the romantic fancies fed by memories, folklore and advertisers, and face the reality of the best way to get from A to B. Such a reality check up, they argue, could result in a more rational approach to driving with people using cars less and walking or bicycling or taking buses or trains more.” ―The Providence Journal

“Rigorously researched and briskly written” ―The Post and Courier

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press (January 5, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230618138
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230618138
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,034,881 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jason Stokes VINE VOICE on March 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I particularly enjoyed this book's layout of our American car culture - from the dreaminess of the 16 year old with their first keys, through the marketing process as buyer and seller, and ultimately, why the car culture has it's challenges, it was an entertaining read. I do admit, however, that it's very one sided - it's largely anti-car, as can be expected from the title, but not violently or disruptively so.

Particularly challenging for me were two chapters - one outlining how difficult it is for the working poor with very little money to have a car, and the challenges that come with being carless in a world built for automobiles, and the other chapter outlining the damage that cars do to lives and property in "accidents." Cars may be safer now than 30 years ago, but since we drive them more, and are more careless while doing so, driving a car remains the most risky thing most of us do any day.

In all, a very well reasoned and well put forward argument about moving from the auto-centered (and auto-required) culture into something a little more beneficial to all of society. I highly recommend this book.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Since before I obtained a driver's license, let alone owned a car, I dreaded the idea of driving. It might have just been my personality - or had I realized the crazy-danger of automobile travel even if nothing articulated that thought as well as the book CARJACKED: THE CULTURE OF THE AUTOMOBILE & ITS EFFECT ON OUR LIVES, does? As a boy I was a passenger when accidents happened once with my mother driving and twice with my brother behind the wheel, though none caused injury. An even narrower escape came one time my father was driving, when an out-of-control car sped across the street, missing us by maybe five feet, crashing into a storefront. And I can remember that by time I started driving, three children who attended my school died in car wrecks and the families of three other kids I knew lost their parents to automobile accidents. All of that may have been in the back of my mind when I decided cars had no appeal to me, as I did not desire luxury or sports autos and certainly hated the limits of holding a steering wheel when I could have been on a train or bus, reading.

It took a long time but I've finally become a mass transit commuter, my daily drive only as far as the train station. I read CARJACKED over several train trips and if nothing else encourage readers to pick it up just for the book's ninth chapter, titled "Full Metal Jacket: The Body Count," which confirms everything about driving that made me wish cars were not a necessity for most Americans:

-Thank God for all the lives Ralph Nader saved promoting seat belts and air bags, but nonetheless CARJACKED reports 112 Americans still die every day in auto accidents.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
For those of us who take getting into a car, turning the key in the ignition, and driving off as a simple fact of life, Carjacked asks the reader to pause for a moment to think seriously about the role of automobiles in our lives. The result is an intelligent and highly readable examination of all that results from a culture so reflexively connected to driving, but not necessarily to all of its varied and real costs. The book effortlessly weaves anthropological analysis with cultural criticism, and concludes not just with an argument for increased access to public transportation but also with a sensible and highly practical appeal for personal reflection on the real price of depending on cars to shape the direction of our lives. I loved this book, not just because it is so smartly argued and such a pleasurable read, but because it challenged me--to reconsider a simple, eveyday act, and from that reconsideration to come to a better understanding of my world--and my car.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a well-researched and thoughtful examination of a an aspect of our lives that we, as a society, have embraced. The authors allow us to take a close look at the multi-faceted effects that cars have on our lives, both individually and collectively. Engaging, entertaining and intelligent.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
As a suburban working mom who logs hundreds of miles every week in her car, I was dreading the guilt I thought this book would bring. Its lively, upbeat, creative style and tone and paradigm shifts energized me instead, so I'm thinking every day about how I can escape being carjacked. Why not walk to the grocery store -- getting some sun and exercise while driving down the miles logged? Why not think about probable length of drivability when buying a new car? Why not carpool a day a week? Why not, longterm, consider a move to a job/home/lifestyle that allows me even more freedom -- freedom from my car and all its liabilities? Carjacked's mix of data, anecdotal snapshots and straight talk entertained and inspired. I loved this book.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By JS on March 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover
After reading this book, I'm glad I live in a city where I don't need a car. It's really amazing to see the big picture and to see just how harmful automobiles are to our wellbeing and to the earth. The book allows you to see, on a large scale, the effects of cars on our lives -- effects we don't even realize -- and the power of car companies to influence us. There was clearly a lot of research done to put this together, and I love that it offers suggestions at the end so that we can start reducing our dependence on cars. The book is very interesting and well-written and I think everyone should read it.. because everyone who is a driver or who knows one is affected.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Carjacked: The Culture of the Automobile and Its Effect on Our Lives
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Carjacked: The Culture of the Automobile and Its Effect on Our Lives