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on October 14, 2017
(Reviewing Paramount 14637): "To Catch a Thief" is the kind of classic movie from the 1950s for which Blu-ray/HD technology was made, and this disc does not disappoint. The many exterior shots of the south of France are breathtaking: the details of the villas on promontories, the helicopter scans of the coastal cities, the blue of the Mediterranean: the sexual fireworks display (no pun intended) at night. Robert Burks, Hitchcock's cinematographer throughout the 1950s and early '60s, deservedly won an Academy Award for his his work here. I'm astonished by how well the process shots from the '50s (scenes shot in a studio against a projected background) still hold up against a technological improvement like Blu-ray, capable of highlighting all the flaws. I see no such here. As for detail: 1080p HD differentiates each of the dozens of fine stripes in Cary Grant's casual knit-shirt, if that's where your eyes gravitate (though I'd bet they'll be focused elsewhere). I cannot detect vast improvement in audio quality over Paramount's DVD predecessors, but the sound is crisp, clear, and balanced. Also included are an abundance of special features, though none of them is new to this edition: they previously appeared in Paramount's DVD Centennial Edition.

As for the movie: While (to my taste) not in the same league as "Vertigo," "North by Northwest," or "Psycho," I cannot give "To Catch a Thief fewer than five stars. Hitchcock produced more profound movies than this but very few that are more uninhibitedly entertaining. It's probably the best comedy he ever produced, with a cast that radiates old Hollywood charm: notably, Cary Grant, in a late-career-defining role, and Grace Kelly at the crest of her fame. The script by John Michael Hayes competes with that for "Rear Window" (from the year before) as the wittiest any writer ever gave Hitchcock. (You can sense Hitchcock and Hayes's glee at filling the scripts with double entendres that the censors wouldn't catch but the audiences couldn't miss.) The audience is privileged to laugh, make love with two of the screen's sexiest actors, and revel in the "picture travelogue heaven" of Nice and Cannes in mid-twentieth century. Highly Recommended.
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on March 31, 2017
This book is the basis for the story used in the movie To Catch A Thief with Cary Grant and Grace Kelly. The book is not as light and frothy as the movie; it's written in a noir style. I usually enjoy reading books from which familiar movies were made. I like to have an idea of what the writer intended. And the book is quite different. I enjoyed it.
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Alfred Hitchcock made two kinds of movies: bone-chilling thrillers that looked into the dark side of human nature, and witty adventure stories.

"To Catch A Thief" is a sterling example of the latter kind of movie -- a chic, sleek, golden-tinted caper, full of witty dialogue and solid acting from legendary actors. Despite the taut action scenes, Hitchcock makes it feel almost like a cinematic vacation.

Paul Robie (Cary Grant) was "The Cat," the most notorious jewel thief in Europe, before he retired. But now impossible heists -- made in Robie's style -- are popping up all over Cannes, and he's the immediate suspect. Narrowly escaping the police, he enlists a friend to help him clear his name by capturing this new Cat.

To do that, he masquerades as an American tourist, and gets to know pretty oil heiress Frances Stevens (Grace Kelly) and her mother. But when the Stevens jewels are stolen, Frances brings the cops down on Robie -- and now he is more desperate than ever to find the Cat, because he suspects it's an old friend...

Hitchcock was in fine form with "To Catch a Thief," especially since he had two great actors in the mix. Granted this isn't one of his more insightful or suspenseful movies, but it captures a sense of sly wit and fun instead.

If "To Catch A Thief" has a problem, it's that astute viewers will be able to guess who the Cat is after about a half hour, maximum. But fortunately viewers can be distracted by Hitchcock's knack for razor-sharp dialogue ("What do you say?" "My only comment would be highly censorable") and double entendres (during an intimate lunch, Francie asks, "You want a leg or a breast?").

It's also gorgeous to behold -- he entire movie is bathed in the golden Riviera sun, with lots of swimming, fast car chases, elaborate costume balls, and ornate hotels. But Hitchcock winds it up with a genuinely tense rooftop chase, complete with wrestling and gunshots.

Grant is a bit grizzled (and VERY overtanned) here, but still dapper and charming enough for Robie, a thief with principles and a taste for the good life. Kelly is also quite good as an heiress who is less prim than she appears; John Williams and Jessie Royce Landis have fun supporting roles as a "veddy veddy English" insurance man and a shrewd rich woman.

And apparently the studio is doing right by "To Catch A Thief" -- the two-disc Centennial edition has featurettes on film censorship, stars of the 1950s, "making-of," "appreciation of," travelogue, galleries, something about somebody named Edith Head, and even a commentary by a Hitchcock film scholar.

a commentary by a Hitchcock historian, feat

"To Catch A Thief" is a warm, sumptuous piece of classic film, with great dialogue and even better acting. Fun, stylish little mystery.
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on October 19, 2016
I bought this book on Amazon. It reached me well in time and in very good condition. I had seen its movie, but the book was also quite good. It is a little different from the original story of the movie, but this book also is well written, logically and with uncomplicated English. It has some romance also in it, which added to the spice of the novel. It has suspense and I really like the happy ending for everyone. I recommend it for at least once reading.
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Alfred Hitchcock made two kinds of movies: bone-chilling thrillers that looked into the dark side of human nature, and witty adventure stories.

"To Catch A Thief" is a sterling example of the latter kind of movie -- a chic, sleek, golden-tinted caper, full of witty dialogue and solid acting from legendary actors. Despite the taut action scenes, Hitchcock makes it feel almost like a cinematic vacation.

Paul Robie (Cary Grant) was "The Cat," the most notorious jewel thief in Europe, before he retired. But now impossible heists -- made in Robie's style -- are popping up all over Cannes, and he's the immediate suspect. Narrowly escaping the police, he enlists a friend to help him clear his name by capturing this new Cat.

To do that, he masquerades as an American tourist, and gets to know pretty oil heiress Frances Stevens (Grace Kelly) and her mother. But when the Stevens jewels are stolen, Frances brings the cops down on Robie -- and now he is more desperate than ever to find the Cat, because he suspects it's an old friend...

Hitchcock was in fine form with "To Catch a Thief," especially since he had two great actors in the mix. Granted this isn't one of his more insightful or suspenseful movies, but it captures a sense of sly wit and fun instead.

If "To Catch A Thief" has a problem, it's that astute viewers will be able to guess who the Cat is after about a half hour, maximum. But fortunately viewers can be distracted by Hitchcock's knack for razor-sharp dialogue ("What do you say?" "My only comment would be highly censorable") and double entendres (during an intimate lunch, Francie asks, "You want a leg or a breast?").

It's also gorgeous to behold -- he entire movie is bathed in the golden Riviera sun, with lots of swimming, fast car chases, elaborate costume balls, and ornate hotels. But Hitchcock winds it up with a genuinely tense rooftop chase, complete with wrestling and gunshots.

Grant is a bit grizzled (and VERY overtanned) here, but still dapper and charming enough for Robie, a thief with principles and a taste for the good life. Kelly is also quite good as an heiress who is less prim than she appears; John Williams and Jessie Royce Landis have fun supporting roles as a "veddy veddy English" insurance man and a shrewd rich woman.

"To Catch A Thief" is a warm, sumptuous piece of classic film, with great dialogue and even better acting. Fun, stylish little mystery.
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on September 20, 2017
To Catch a Thief portrays a man who used to be a thief and is being accused of once again stealing. He is bent on finding the real thief to clear his name. Movie has adventure and romance and does not have any cussing or using God's name in vain.
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on September 17, 2017
Elegant, well-played. Grant and Kelly work well together! I recently rented this to watch with my 87 year old Mom, who has dementia. She was mesmerized and calmed by it and smiled to herself and sipped a fake cocktail while watching.
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VINE VOICEon May 18, 2012
You may not know David Dodge, but you most likely have heard of the Hitchcock film starring Cary Grant and Grace Kelly, on which this book is based. The film took some liberties with the book, but the book would stand the test of time without the film. It's the story of John Robie, an infamous and very successful jewel thief who is caught by the French authorities right before WWII breaks out. Escaping during a prison break while the Nazi's hold France, Robie retires and tries to live the straight life on the beautiful Cote d'Azur after the war.

However, a copycat burglar suddenly appears, and to all of France and especially the police, it looks like Le Chat as Robie had been known, is back. Throw into the mix a mother and her beautiful daughter, both with more jewelry than they need, and all the obvious plot elements fall into place. The scenes on the rooftop when Robie is tracking and sparring with the real thief are wonderfully done, as are the descriptions of many locale along the Cote d'Azur.

When I finished the book, I asked myself if I preferred the book or the film. I really like the movie, but I think Dodge's original story line was even better than what Hitchcock changed.

This edition from Bruin Books is a wonderful re-issue with great introductory and concluding comments. Bruin is to be commended for their attention to releasing books by a writer many readers should get to know.

Recommended highly.
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on August 19, 2015
Before there was Sean Connery or Roger Moore, there was Cary Grant and before there was Ursula Andress or Honor Blackman, there was Grace Kelly. Those two, with the help of many gifted actors and actresses and Hitch, of course, made this film a classic that can even work today if given the chance. The handsomeness of Cary Grant and the beauty of Grace Kelly were both out of this world. I don't think anyone's ever going to match them and who can ever forget catch phrases such as, "The Cat has a new kitten," " Sorry I ever sent her to finishing school. I think they finished her there.," "You want a leg or a breast? You make the choice.," or "You know as well as I do: this necklace is imitation. Well, I'm not." If there is one word to describe this film (to describe a Hitchcock film, even), that word would be...CLASS!
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on February 9, 2014
To Catch a Thief is another wonderful Hitchcock film. In it a very suave and debonaire John Robie, Cary Grant, is the much maligned hero trying to prove his innocence of a recent spat of jewelry thiefts that have all the markings of his past exploits from shortly after World War II. All of his old French underground friends now suspect him as well as the police and the public in general. Grace Kelly plays the beautiful and sophisticated Frances Stevens, a rich daughter of a very down to earth mother who has a large amount of jewelry that would be a prime target for 'the cat', Cary Grant's character. John and Frances of course fall for each other but it is a rocky road down that trail as they have somewhat conflicting interests and fears. Some fine performances by the supporting characters, especially the mother and the insurance investigator, make for a well done and enjoyable movie experience.

I would highly recommend this movie to any old movie or mystery fans!
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