Lyft Industrial Deals Best Books of the Month Red Shoes We Love nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Stream your favorites. Amazon music Unlimited. Learn more. All-New Fire 7, starting at $49.99 Starting at $39.99 Grocery Handmade Gift Shop Home and Garden Book a house cleaner for 2 or more hours on Amazon victoriaS2 victoriaS2 victoriaS2  Three new members of the Echo family Fire 7, starting at $49.99 Kindle Paperwhite Game of Thrones: The Complete Seasons 1-7 now available on Blu-ray and DVD Shop now TG18_gno



Showing 1-10 of 28 reviews(1 star). See all 734 reviews
on October 1, 2016
Horrible book! It is very hard to read.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on December 27, 2017
It's very dry and hard to read. I'm forcing myself to read it. Many other fanstastic spiritual books - this is not one of them.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on June 5, 2015
very boring but information informative if you skim it.
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on November 30, 2016
I bought this book for a class that was taught in our church. This book is a veiled introduction to Catholic mysticism. I am a former Catholic and recognized it for what it was. Foster points to authors who are into Hinduism and Buddhism. This deception is setting us up for the one-world religion that the Bible has told us would come.
11 comment| 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on January 14, 2018
Foster writes about visualizing to heal (and presents it as prayer!), for example, and using the imagination to effect changes in reality (page 25 of COD, 1998). He credits his mentor, New Thought influenced Agnes Sanford, for learning about using the imagination in prayer (which is visualization in Foster's terms).
If I had to list here all the New Thought examples Foster uses in COD, it would take up too much time and space. So here are just a few New Thought references from the 20th Anniversary edition of the book, 1998. I placed an asterisk * in front of each point.
*Foster quotes a New Thought concept from New Thought teacher and writer Emmet Fox, p. 5
*Foster teachers affirmation techniques as prayer, such as stating “I release” and “I surrender,” using your hands to “release,” p. 31
*“We are working with God to determine the future,” p. 35 (the second such statement on this page)
*Prayer should be like a command to those we are praying for, p. 37 (as when Jesus and the apostles healed people and told them to walk, stand up, etc.)
*Although Foster admits there is a time to pray for God's will, he deems it not necessary all the time, such as doing the “command” prayers. In those situations, he considers asking for God's will to be “indecisive, tentative, half-hoping,” p. 37.
***[In New Thought, it is taught not to ask for God's will because prayer is more of a technique than an actual petition to a personal God. The New Thought God is more of a principle than personal. On a pro-Foster site, it states that Foster teaches we need to listen to God to know his will and then pray in that will instead of saying “if it is your will” to God (quote and source found below under Resources).]
*Praying for others requires that we let God's “life and power flow through us into others,” p. 38 (Sanford often writes about channeling God's “power” in healing)
*“We can determine if we are praying correctly if the requests come to pass,” p. 38
*“Imagination often opens the door to faith,” p. 41 (by “imagination” he means visualization)
*Visualization and affirmations are given as “prayer” in several examples from pages 41-45
*More visualization techniques are taught, including if you see people entering church who seem downcast, visualize them in God's light with their burdens falling from their shoulders. Foster teaches this as intercession, p. 163
*Foster, without giving any biblical basis for it, writes that our imagination is sanctified (25-26) and therefore, we should use visualization in prayer.
Notice the technique below that Foster advocates, which is exactly the same as is found in New Thought and the New Age:
Quote==... I was once called to a home to pray for a seriously ill baby girl. Her four-year-old brother was in the room and so I told him I needed his help to pray for his baby sister. ... He climbed up into the chair beside me. ‘Let’s play a little game,’ I said. ‘Since we know that Jesus is always with us, let’s imagine that He is sitting over in the chair across from us. He is waiting patiently for us to center our attention on Him. When we see Him, we start thinking more about His love than how sick Julie is. He smiles, gets up, and comes over to us. Then let’s both put our hands on Julie and when we do, Jesus will put His hands on top of ours. We’ll watch and imagine that the light from Jesus is flowing right into your little sister and making her well. Let’s pretend that the light of Christ fights with the bad germs until they are all gone. Okay!’ Seriously the little one nodded. Together we prayed in this childlike way and then thanked the Lord that what we ‘saw’ was the way it was going to be (Celebration of Discipline, 1978, p. 37). ==Found at goo.gl/EgLBD5
***Comments***
Foster apparently learned about visualization, affirmations, channeling God's power, verbal commanding as prayer, and inner healing principles from Sanford.
There are numerous other problems with the book which would take me probably 100 hours or more to write out.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on August 7, 2014
Boring dry read
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on June 14, 2014
This is a deceptive book on Catholic mysticism. It blends eastern and Catholic mysticism with Christianity. His definitions of religious words are different than biblical definitions.
33 comments| 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on February 23, 2015
I have only read the first 4 chapters, but I'm just finding this book a torture to read. The author is so ridiculously pompous and arrogant, that it has truly been an exercise in discipline to force myself to go from one paragraph to the next. Foster somehow finds a way to discuss every subject as a play between self congratulatory expositions, ridiculing statements about those who disagree and huge generalities stated as simple fact.

The only redeeming aspect of this book has been to compile his curated bibliography of the subject.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on May 3, 2014
No matter of his declaration that this is not eastern mysticism in the first few chapters, it still is. Read this book as a case study in how post-modern liberalism is sneaking ungodly ideas, and thus practices, into the church. Read with a sensitive radar going.
22 comments| 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on March 14, 2017
This is new age nonsense. Certainly not Christianity
11 comment| 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse