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Central Machinery 7" x 10" Precision Mini Lathe

4.3 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews
| 26 answered questions

Price: $519.99 + $47.99 shipping
Only 9 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Michaelsons.
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  • Chuck guard with micro switch
  • 18 threads from 12-52 TPI
  • Reversible
  • Automatic feed
  • Tool post;
5 new from $519.99
$519.99 + $47.99 shipping Only 9 left in stock. Ships from and sold by Michaelsons.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Central Machinery 7" x 10" Precision Mini Lathe
  • +
  • Mini Lathe Starter Kit (5/16" Tool Bits)
  • +
  • Grizzly G9776 Carbide-Tipped Tool Bit Sets, 3/8-Inch, 20-Piece
Total price: $583.43
Buy the selected items together

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Product Description

With 18 threads and variable speed control Whether you're turning, counter facing or making bushings, spindles, - Visit Harbor Freight Tools For More Information.

Product Information

Technical Details

Material steal rotater handels made of plastic
Power Source corded-electric

Additional Information

ASIN B006ZB9W6Q
Customer Reviews
4.3 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Best Sellers Rank #369,787 in Home Improvements (See top 100)
#36 in Home Improvement > Power & Hand Tools > Power Tools > Lathes > Metal Lathes
Shipping Weight 87 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
Date First Available May 10, 2012

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Product Warranty: For warranty information about this product, please click here

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Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Marcus Burrows on December 8, 2013
I bought mine from Harbor Freight as a ready to run machine. At least that was the plan, as I knew little about lathes at the time. Roll forward a couple of years and I feel I have one or two comments that may be of value. First off, any new lathe is essentially a kit of parts. Once you have scraped off the packing grease and given it a nice wipe down you have this unknown monster staring at you. Next you will need to set it up. Ignore the manual, the writers have no clue. Go to any search engine and look for advice on setting up a lathe - there is a lot out there and it's all valuable to one extent or another. While this is going on you will need to add cutting tools, hex keys (adjustments) and some goodies like starter kits and replacement screw sets from Little Machine Shop (add this site to your browser, you will go there frequently). Micromark sometimes beats them on price and shipping, so shop around.

Follow the advice in the various posts on setup slowly and deliberately, checking for results at each step - it sounds ponderous but it is fun and very enlightening. By now you will be filthy and oily but better acquainted with your tool, which itself is now set up to actually do something. Now you need to read up on how to machine something (assuming you are a novice - like me) so sit down and absorb all the wisdom and experience that is out there. Tea/coffee/beer time!

Then play around a little to see how it performs/behaves/could be better, based on your now informed perspective and experience of fettling it. By now you have got to know your lathe, it's vibrations and noises. That is what I meant by a kit of parts - ready to be set up to perform, but 'out of the box'? No way - but as I found out, no lathe should be be regarded as 'ready to run'.
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I have had two Central Machinery 7" x 10" Mini-lathes. The first one I wore smooth out and finally ended up selling it as junk iron for $8.00. Although when I junked it, I had removed a non-working on/off switch and the speed control knob was inaccurate. Also, the auto-feed lever stayed loose and had to be held up with a rubber band when in use. I bought a second one and have had problems with it too. Mostly, it suddenly would only run on 1 speed(well one speed in high and one speed in low). I first tried getting a rheostat speed control and replaced it, but it did no good. No difference. I then ordered the entire control box and it did no good. I also tried using the control box and rheostat from my first machine before junking it, but it didn't work either. Now I have another $500.00 paper weight, unless I need to use it on one speed. Got them both from Harbor Freight by the way, and the manual that came with it is all but worthless, about 12 pages of undecipherable gibberish. Also, the thread gear change pattern on the side of the machine contradicts the one in the "manual." Tech Support is virtually non existent and the service people on the phone are in Bangladesh or some damn place and can't speak English well enough to have a good conversation with. Not really recommended! I am considering going through Grizzly Industrial. I think the machine is identical, however I believe getting parts and tech support will be 100% better. For one thing they have a very thorough 48 page pdf manual that I have already printed to help me with my Central Machinery version. Plus they have parts; such as a lathe dog and faceplate that CM doesn't even offer. Hope this helps. So if you are thinking of going to Harbor Freight to get one, I would save up more money and go somewhere else like Grizzly or Enco.
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This is a nice little Central Machinery 7x10 lathe. It was shipped and arrived quickly. The crate it arrived in looked like it had been rolled at least halfway from China to my door, the shipping bolts were bent, and I was afraid to look inside on initial receipt; however there was no damage to the machine. I unpacked it, and there were no missing parts. This lathe will take some cleaning and adjustment to really work well, but for the price it is a good deal. There is so much information on the internet about set-up, improvement, use, and projects to make with this lathe. Keep in mind that there are some parts you must buy to operate, like bits, center drills, parting blades, etc. Also remember that there is a lot of stuff you need for this machine that you can make yourself. I have been having fun making parts for my other hobbies and the house, and also making tools to use with the lathe itself.
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I bought mine from Harbor Freight but it's the identical machine. In fact the vast majority of machines in this size range are from the same factory -- Seig -- in Shanghai and virtually 100% of everything interchanges.

FIRST: READ ALL THE REVIEWS HERE. Nearly everything that everyone says is true, even the contradictions. This is a WHALE of a lot of machine at a very good price and what you don't get is a polished and 100% buttoned-down just flip the switch and go lathe.

If you're coming into machine work cold -- just want to try -- then this is the machine for you IF you have good mechanical common sense and are looking for a learning experience.

If uncertain, consider finding a continuing education machine shop course. It'll help immensely if you can start with machines that already work properly under the guidance of an experienced instructor. Among other things, not all the safety precautions for a lathe are obvious.

On mine the gibs were way loose. Had I tried to cut anything 'as received' it would have chattered like crazy and messed up or ruined the piece. The chuck nuts weren't tight but probably I'd have known something was switch-it-off-NOW wrong before there was a Surprising Event.

I'll mention just two and a half precautions: DON'T DRINK before or during. This is plenty of horsepower to kill or maim you and you want to be absolutely clear headed. And NO LOOSE CLOTHING OR HAIR. Cover, tie, remove, whatever, but don't get a necktie or pony tail anywhere close to a running machine.

The half is: That's a tiny chuck but get in the habit of putting a board over the ways when changing it or handling a heavy piece of work. There's nothing says 'slob' more loudly than dinged-up ways on your lathe.
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