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Cha-No-Yu: The Japanese Tea Ceremony

4.7 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Tuttle Pub (1977)
  • ASIN: B000KY67SA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,897,436 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
67%
4 star
33%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I have the ninth edition (1989) which does not credit Michele Sadler. This is the most enjoyable and informative overview of the topic I have yet found. It covers everything from the shapes of the tea kettles to the landscape design surrounding famous tea rooms.
The book is interesting in that it discusses many particulars of the tea ceremony and its equipment, but balances this information nicely with many anecdotes which convey the "feeling" of the tea ceremony. The book also provides the reader with valuable historical insight about the development of the tea ceremony.
An important feature of the book is that the index contains the Kanji characters for the items listed.
I did not give the book a five star rating because it has black and white plates which do not adequately convey the colors of the tea bowls, and because many particulars of the tea ceremony could have been given more comprehensive treatment.
I have, however, re-read my copy several times, and I think that it is well worth adding to your book collection.
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Format: Paperback
Arthur Lindsay Sadler's "Cha-No-Yu" is one of those indispensable yet oddly quaint classics from the golden age of studies in Japanese Culture, back in the day when such was merely a small subset of "Oriental Studies" and you could get away with giving your book an obvious and self-explanatory title with a straight face. These were also the days when simply making knowledge on Japan available to English speakers was rightfully considered worthy of scholarly care in and of itself--no obscurely verbose excursions into critical theory nor bad-humored ideological critiques, just the facts narrated with warm sympathy. Which means that these good old classics remain useful years and even decades after their first publication, and that's certainly the case for this book, a fine facsimile reprint by Tuttle of the original 1933 edition. The wealth of information on the Japanese Tea Ceremony contained within the confines of these pages is as staggering as it is intriguing.

Perhaps accidentally mirroring Tea aesthetics, the book is astoundingly asymmetrical, consisting of three chapters of wildly varying length and character. The first chapter is 92 pages and goes into the many details about the actual tea ceremony: its customs and procedures, its utensils and settings, its early history and philosophical background. Some of the seemingly nitpicky step-by-step descriptions herein can border on the tedious at times, but it is what it is (as they say)--if you want to know what the Tea Ceremony is like, this is an important part of it. The massive second chapter takes up more than half of the book and is perhaps the most interesting in some ways.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
THIS book is really SOMETHING BIG when it comes to approach TEA CEREMONY.
The first book about this is "the way of tea" by Okakura. But this, the second...written almost 30 years later...is really complete.
Enjoy and drink a green elixir.
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