Digital List Price: $4.99
Kindle Price: $3.99

Save $1.00 (20%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Challenger: An American Tragedy: The Inside Story from Launch Control by [Harris, Hugh]
Kindle App Ad

Challenger: An American Tragedy: The Inside Story from Launch Control Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 49 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$3.99

click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

Review

“This book has all the facts, but more importantly, offers insight into the people. The people are what the space program is all about.” —From the introduction by Robert L. Crippen, pilot of the first space shuttle mission

“Finally, the accurate story has been written by one from Challenger’s Launch Control. Hugh Harris’ Challenger: An American Tragedy is a masterpiece.” —Jay Barbree, author of Moon Shot: The Inside Story of America’s Race to the Moon

“Harris offers a personal—and sometimes painful—look back at one of the darkest chapters in U.S. human spaceflight, as well as its impact on NASA over time.” —Space.com

“More than just a personal account of the disaster, Harris punctuates his book with conversations and interactions between himself and some of [NASA’s] key players, bringing the story to life. Throughout, Harris’ love for NASA and the shuttle program is obvious.” —Discovery.com

About the Author

Called “the Voice of NASA” for many years by the world’s television networks, Hugh Harris devoted thirty-five years with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to telling the story of the United States space program. Although he is best known to the public for his calm, professional commentary on the progress of launch preparations and launch of the space shuttle, his primary accomplishments were in directing an outreach program to the general public, news media, students, and educators, as well as to business and government leaders. He also oversaw the largest major expansion (up to that time) in the history of the Kennedy Space Center’s visitor complex and tours.

Harris began his career as a member of the news media. He worked as a reporter and broadcaster for WMTR in Morristown, New Jersey, and as a reporter and photographer for two newspapers.

After his retirement in 1998, he shared his experience in NASA public relations with nuclear industry leaders at conferences held by the United Nations’ International Atomic Energy Agency in Europe and Japan and in this country through the Nuclear Energy Institute.

He continues to work as a volunteer at the KSC Press Site, as well as for the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation.

Product Details

  • File Size: 578 KB
  • Print Length: 90 pages
  • Publisher: Open Road Media (January 28, 2014)
  • Publication Date: January 28, 2014
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00HO12CRC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #180,551 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
When we were sure that the Space Shuttle Program was well behind us, and all the books that have been written about it where published, comes a rear little gem of a book, Challenger: An American Tragedy, written by Hugh Harris. The book has sixty-one pages, sixteen chapters, six photographs and no statistical graphs. So what is so special about this newcomer and why should this book be found in every library in the Unites States and hopefully read by every student born after 1986 at home and abroad as well as by «Shuttle» enthusiasts in every country around the world. The answer lies with the author and his brilliantly written sixteen chapters. They are in chronological order, with matching page numbers on the right side,

Chapter one: A look back twenty-eight years (3)
Chapter two: A cold, cold night (5)
Chapter three: The launch (10)
Chapter four: After the launch (17)
Chapter five: Challenger and the White House (22)
Chapter six: Reporters, reporters everywhere (25)
Chapter seven: The Commission (27)
Chapter eight: Scoop! (29)
Chapter nine: Whose fault was it? (31)
Chapter ten: The search at sea (34)
Chapter eleven: Putting together the pieces (38)
Chapter twelve: Commission conclusions (41)
Chapter thirteen: The crew (44)
Chapter fourteen: The response (47)
Chapter fifteen: The return to flight (51)
Chapter sixteen: The challenge remains (54)

This is the true and "down-to-earth" story about the Challenger STS-33/51-L Shuttle disaster which happened on Tuesday, January 28, 1986, as seen through the eyes of Hugh Harris, the veteran NASA launch commenter who spent thirty-five years covering major technological events, often being referred to as "The Voice of NASA". At 11:38 a.m.
Read more ›
2 Comments 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
With several excellent books on the Challenger disaster available, why would anybody write another? The answer in this case is that this is an account by the voice of NASA himself, Hugh Harris, someone who must have had a unique perspective on the events of January 28th, 1986 as they occurred. This is his take on the story.

It is a pretty slim volume; a fast reader will get through it in about 45 minutes. If you have read one of the other excellent accounts of the disaster by Cook, Vaughan or McDonald and Hansen this book is not going to tell you much that is new. Nor, if by some chance you happen to be totally unfamiliar with the Challenger disaster, will it give you much more than an overview of some of what happened.

Nonetheless, it has a certain easy charm. It is thoroughly readable and does deliver a few surprises and thought provoking insights. For those interested in the disaster, it would make a useful addition to their library; however for anybody who is looking for a thorough account of the events leading up to and following on from this catastrophe, there are better places to start.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed everything I read in the summation of this American tragedy. The technical information, although interesting, was not whati Interested me most. I wanted to know what happened to our astronauts following the explosion. To know their bodies were recovered, form the great depth of the ocean, then brought to the surface and eventually returned to their families brought closure to my questions and that they received a proper burial, I know eased the minds of many. Some were buried in family plots, some in military cemetery's and three others, including the teacher, Christie Mc Cullough, were buried together in a tomb at The Challenger Memorial site in Washington DC. It was the little details that interested me. Where they were found, some still in their seats, a couple were located below the others. Were their signs that some survived on their way down. What positions they were in and what condition their bodies were found in? It has been many years since The Challenger exploded but I think of it from time to time, especially when watching many lift offs from our lanai on the ocean front on Amelia Islanf, GA. My children were all present when it happened, having remained home to watch the exciting launch with a teacher aboard. When The Challenger exploded less than two minutes into flight, they screamed then sat staring dumbfounded at the TV, not believing what they saw and heard. Then the tears came ... and came. The brave astronauts are now part of our American history and will be honored and remembered along with our great American heroes forever after. In the back of my mind, my thoughts are of all the children who watched the explosion in horror, especially the families of the astronauts ... the children of Christie Mc Cullough and her students. God bless them all.Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Hugh Harris was the Public Affairs Commentator for the Challenger launch, which makes him part of the NASA public relations department. The book seems exactly what you would expect from a member of the NASA public relations team.

=== The Good Stuff ===

* As expected, Harris writes very well. The narrative keeps moving, is easy to read, and rewards the reader with a high content of information per page. The author captures the whole Challenger story, from the biographies of the astronauts to the final results of the investigation.

* While I have read quite a bit of material on this mission, there were still a number of facts and anecdotes that I hadn't heard before. For example, Harris points out that Ron McNair, the Afro-American astronaut was once denied a library card as a child growing up in the South. Today, that very library is named after him.

* The narrative is complete, and doesn't sugarcoat or withhold any information, even that which is not exactly flattering to NASA or its contractors. The book is not especially technical, and is probably well within the understanding of anyone interested enough in the topic to consider reading the book. He avoids the usual NASA tecnobabble and acronym-madness.

=== The Not-So-Good Stuff ===

* The book is exactly as you would expect from a NASA PR type. There are no shocking revelations, and no new shocking revelations or smoking guns. That is most likely a result of the incident being reasonably well understood and investigated previously.
However Harris also avoids any higher order discussions. At its lowest level, the accident was caused by O-Rings operating outside their temperature constraints. This is where Harris stops.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Challenger: An American Tragedy: The Inside Story from Launch Control
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Challenger: An American Tragedy: The Inside Story from Launch Control