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Comment: Very Good - Vintage 1978 - Hardcover with Dust Jacket - Fly Page Removed - Quality Guaranteed - Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver / Prime Shipping , 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
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Chance and Circumstance: The Draft, the War, and the Vietnam Generation Unknown Binding – 1978

4.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding: 312 pages
  • Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf; 1st edition (1978)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394412753
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394412757
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,339,437 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is an outstanding, dispassionate study of a difficult topic: what happened to draft-age men during the Vietnam War? There are plenty of stories about this, many published, thousands more in the memories of my generation. But what none of them provide, and Baskir & Strauss do, is aggregated statistics on all of the variables involved. What were your chances of getting a deferment? For medical reasons? On grounds of conscience? Suppose you wanted to enlist in a less-lethal branch of service, such as the National Guard or Army Reserve? What were your chances of getting in, and how did this affect your overall odds of winding up in combat? The data are there - not complete, but certainly sufficient - and the authors have waded through them to provide us with answers. Not surprisingly, the central finding is that at almost every stage, if you were well educated or wealthy, your odds (of avoiding combat in Vietnam) were better. This is not a book that tries to make an "argument," but it provides the information from which you can figure one out for yourself
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Excellent!
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Format: Paperback
Chance and Circumstance tries to prove that "low-income" males got shafted during Vietnam. Using lots of statistics, it shows how the men from affluent backgrounds escaped Vietnam; college deferments, National Guard, Air Force, etc. The disadvantage was that there were few openings in the National Guard, and most of the recruits were college graduates. Similarly, the Air Force was more open to educated men, and for a high school dropout, a college deferment was out of the question.

My fault with this book is that there are too many statistics. Most of the stories are told in the third person; few first-person accounts are provided. While this book might be useful to a college student doing a report on the Vietnam War, I would recommend first-person accounts.

Let's keep in mind the controversy about George W. Bush's service (or lack of it) during the Vietnam War. There were many reports of him evading his duties, but the most damning evidence was the testimony of his former superiors.

Letting the people tell their stories is always the most accurate way to go. Third-person accounts aren't as reliable.
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