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Chosen But Free: A Balanced View of God's Sovereignty and Free Will
 
 


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Chosen But Free: A Balanced View of God's Sovereignty and Free Will [Paperback]

Norman L. Geisler
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)

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Book Description

August 1, 2010 0764208446 978-0764208447 3
Revised and updated edition of this Geisler favorite provides a scriptural framework for how real human freedom can exist alongside God's sovereignty.

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Chosen But Free: A Balanced View of God's Sovereignty and Free Will + The Potter's Freedom: A Defense of the Reformation and the Rebuttal of Norman Geisler's Chosen But Free
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Norman L. Geisler (PhD, Loyola University of Chicago) has taught at top evangelical colleges and seminaries for over fifty years and is distinguished professor of apologetics and theology at Veritas Evangelical Seminary in Murrieta, California. He is the

Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Bethany House Publishers; 3 edition (August 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0764208446
  • ISBN-13: 978-0764208447
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #42,011 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews
102 of 122 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Overall A Good Book on Election and Free Will August 12, 2010
Format:Paperback
The previous two reviewers before me (and no doubt countless others) say that Geisler is a "functioning Arminian" though he calls himself a moderate Calvinist. Perhaps we should label Geisler as a "4 point Arminian" or a "2 point Calvinist" rather than a moderate Calvinist. I am a "full blown" Arminian and I know that Geisler is not an Arminian in the fullest sense of the word. His acceptance, for example, of eternal security is not in line with Arminianism. So to say that Geisler is a full blown Arminian is not accurate.

Having said that let me state that an Arminian would agree with 90% of what Geisler writes in this book. The majority of the Church would. The majority of the early Church Fathers would. Church history would ascribe his views as the dominant view. That view would be that while God is indeed sovereign, He has created humanity with the ability to choose. The only ones how will take aim at Geisler will be Calvinists. Calvinists reject the notion of free will and believe that God has predetermined whatsoever comes to pass for His own glory and, as Dr. Sam Storms said, "Free will is a myth" opting instead for omnicausality or the idea that God not only controls all things but that He is the direct cause of all things including sin. The Arminian holds that such a view of God is outside of Scripture. Scripture presents a view of God that is loving toward His creation and He has shown this love in His Son (John 3:15-17; Romans 5:8-9; 2 Corinthians 5:18-21). Arminians, such as myself, hold that God's will is not for any to perish but for all to come to repentance (2 Peter 3:9) and that He has given His only begotten Son for all of humanity (1 Timothy 2:1-7; Hebrews 2:9; 1 Peter 3:18).
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47 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Refreshing Book November 15, 2011
Format:Paperback
At the end of the day, Scripture should always interpret Scripture. When it comes to election and predestination, I feel that Calvinists get it wrong by going to one extreme, and Arminians get it wrong by going to the other extreme. Anyone can take a verse or passage out of context and form a doctrine out of it. However, when you look at the revealed nature of God, the consistent message of the ENTIRE Bible, and put it all together, here's what Scripture AS A WHOLE says:

Election is God's plan for salvation that he chose in eternity past to be fulfilled "in Christ". Predestination is the purpose to what salvation accomplishes in the life of a person who believes in Jesus (that all believers will be conformed to the image of Christ).

2 Tim 3:16 tells us that "all" Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for training, etc. When looking at all Scripture we see that God foreknows everything. God does elects certain things and individuals for His own purposes (service, leadership, prophets, etc), but election never includes individual salvation, nor does his foreknowledge cause human events to happen.

Although God knows who will be saved, and He also does all of the "saving", it only becomes effectual in the life of a person when they use their free will to believe and receive Jesus. If God removed this aspect (free will) it would violate his own nature, and a multitude of Scriptures throughout the Bible.

Geisler's book does an excellent job of teaching the whole truth, not just some of it as Calvinists and Arminians like to do. Both extreme views are rooted in pride and elitism, just like the religious Pharisees in Jesus' day. And we all know what God thinks about their views...
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27 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Informative Text on Free Will and God's Sovereignty February 5, 2011
Format:Paperback
'Chosen But Free' is a thoughtful examination of the debate between God's sovereignty and the individual's free will.

It will likely not be pleasing to 'hyper Calvinists' as the author calls them. Nevertheless, it is a very balanced and Scriptural look at this centuries old argument. Dr. Norman Geisler does a terrific job in this book as he does in everything of his that I have read. He is much more concerned about the truth of God's position on the issue than his personal opinion as evidenced by the countless Scriptural references cited.

I came into this book from a rather strong free will position. Through his solid arguments, I think my position is a bit more balanced and Scriptural now.

This is an excellent resource for anyone interested in studying this topic.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Balanced, Perhaps, But Somewhat Upside-Down March 29, 2015
Format:Paperback
Norman Geisler examines the two extremes of the Calvinism and Arminianism debate (also called “free will vs. predestination,” the “vs.” being a misnomer) and seeks a balance between them. He wishes to avoid the ugly interpretations and practical implications of each side. He labels his view as “moderate Calvinism,” but as another reviewer has said, that is neither historically accurate nor intellectually honest. A famed critic says that it is puzzling why Geisler would want to be named “Calvinist” in the first place. But, an honest look at this work will reveal that Geisler is neither a Calvinist nor an Arminian. He is too Calvinistic to be an Arminian, yet too Arminianistic to be a Calvinist. Unlike Arminians, he affirms eternal security, independence of predestination from foreknowledge, and God’s supposed foreordination of all that comes to pass. Unlike Calvinists, he affirms free will, holds that faith precedes regeneration, and defends self-determinism. Norman L. Geisler is not a Calvinist, and Norman L. Geisler is not an Arminian, period. To classify him as either is at best irresponsible. Geisler is a Calminian, plain and simple. (He even says that “there would be some truth in this claim” [p. 185].)
Geisler refers to the opposing parties as “extreme Calvinism” and “extreme Arminianism,” the latter being another term for open theism (the doctrine that God does not know the future), but the former is interesting. Nearly every Calvinist of history would fall under the former category. Geisler calls it “extreme Calvinism” because it goes beyond what John Calvin himself taught. (Geisler is of the persuasion that Calvin rejected the modern Calvinistic tenet of limited atonement.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars he remains at the top of my favorite aurthor list
if your interested in this topic, then you wont want to miss what this author has to share, he remains at the top of my favorite aurthor list. Read more
Published 5 days ago by John J Bradshaw
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Good required seminary book.
Published 20 days ago by tony tucker
3.0 out of 5 stars it is not bad in every
there are 56 pages, 17% of the book, which fall into the chapters titled "Avoiding the Extreme Sovereignty View". Read more
Published 1 month ago by Jane Doe
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
This is a scripturally based examination of the Sovereignty/Free Will doctrinal differences with a middle-ground focus. Very clarifying.
Published 2 months ago by Options
4.0 out of 5 stars Well thought out.
Very balanced in my opinion.
Published 2 months ago by Michael
5.0 out of 5 stars Chosen But Free
If you are looking for a way to understand the sovereignty of God and how it works together with man's free will, I highly suggest this book. Read more
Published 4 months ago by scrappnshelly
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Well presented. Thank you Dr. Geisler.
Published 4 months ago by PaulM
5.0 out of 5 stars It's a mystery!!
Excellent presentation. Shows the balanced view of sovereignty and free will
Published 5 months ago by Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars Very helpful book!
As someone who has recently been "stung" by the painful implications of Calvinism (Could God really be that monstrous? Read more
Published 5 months ago by momof5nh
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
great
Published 7 months ago by geno
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