Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $23.00
  • Save: $2.57 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Christian Tradition: ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by Prime1
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: The cover has visible markings and wear. The pages show normal wear. There is heavy highlighting or handwriting through out the book. All shipping handled by Amazon. Prime eligible when you buy from us!
Trade in your item
Get a $4.80
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine, Vol. 5: Christian Doctrine and Modern Culture (since 1700) (Volume 5) Paperback – October 4, 1991

4.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.43
$13.92 $12.99
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine, Vol. 5: Christian Doctrine and Modern Culture (since 1700) (Volume 5)
  • +
  • The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine, Vol. 4: Reformation of Church and Dogma (1300-1700)
  • +
  • The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine, Vol. 3: The Growth of Medieval Theology (600-1300)
Total price: $59.18
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

This volume begins with the crises of orthodoxy that confronted all Christian denominations by the beginning of the eighteenth century and continues through the twentieth century in its particular concerns with ecumenism.

About the Author

Jaroslav Pelikan (1923-2006) was Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 414 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press (October 4, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226653803
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226653808
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #223,885 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Thomas J. Burns VINE VOICE on February 16, 2009
Format: Paperback
This final volume of Pelikan's massive study of Christian belief has much in common with the first. In that introductory work Christian doctrine unfolds in an alien and at times antagonistic cultural setting, though then the adversaries were for the most part "diverse outsiders" so to speak, Jew and Roman. Volumes two through four tend toward intramural Christian in-house struggle. This work at hand again explores the relationship of Christian belief with outsiders, the key difference being that the outsiders, in many cases, were once insiders. Enlightenment Christianity was beginning to embrace agnosticism.

Pelikan begins his work with Goethe's lament, "I hear the message all right; it is only the Faith that I lack." Goethe was no mean theologian; if anything he was symptomatic of a widespread state of ecclesial exhaustion after several centuries of Reformation wrangling. At roughly the same time Goethe was rending his own soul [1833], two young men attended Holy Thursday services at St. Peter's in Rome. Ralph Waldo Emerson and John Henry Newman left with distinctively different blueprints for the future of foundational theology. How such great minds in the churches embraced the dual factors of exhaustion and modern doubt frame the discussion of doctrinal development into the twentieth century.

Pelikan labors mightily to keep his study from undue influences of modernity [Descartes, Newton, Kant, etc.] but this is not always possible, particularly when the battle ground of dogmatics was shifting away from "shouting louder" to [presumably] more rationally certifiable grounds such as history, which enjoyed a remarkable resurgence under Gibbon and Von Harnack, among others.
Read more ›
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This fifth volume in Jaroslav Pelikan's monumental work, "The Christian Tradition," was likely the hardest for Pelikan to write. After all, following the breakup of Western Christendom due to the revolution wrought by the Protestant Reformers, Christian theology went in so many fragmented directions, how do you choose which to focus on for this volume, which covers the years after 1700 A.D.?

Pelikan can only paint broad brushstrokes in detailing how Christian theology developed in this time frame. He covers all the major Christian theologians of the time, taking pains to ensure a balanced treatment of Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox theologies. He (arbitrarily, but wisely) ends the volume with coverage of the Second Vatican Council, a major event in the history of the universal Church that occurred in the 1960's. As with the other volumes in this series, Pelikan is painstakingly objective; he is careful to simply relate the facts that lead to various theological developments - not give his opinion about them.

But one does get a sense of sadness when reading this volume. Whereas the first three volumes express the mostly unified vision of the Church (albeit already in two factions - East and West - after the first volume), the fourth volume and especially this fifth and final volume reflect the sad reality of the disunity of Christian theology that has occurred, especially since the 16th century. Pelikan ably attempts to show the commonality between the various confessions, but the fact is that the divisions that began almost 500 years ago have been going down more widely divergent paths over the centuries. Even a brilliant mind like Pelikan's cannot unify what is so splintered.
Read more ›
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The title of this magisterial work on the history of Christian doctrine, "Christian Doctrine and Modern Culture," gives an accurate description of the main theme of the book. Pelikan does not try to survey modern theologies in all its varieties (such goal is impractical for the size of this volume anyway), but he succeeds in this book to give a continuous and meaningful narrative of the struggle between traditional doctrines and modern thinking.

The book has 6 chapters. Chapter one is an introduction to the crisis in doctrines in all three major Christian traditions: Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant. Chapter two addresses the intellectual challenges brought on by the Enlightenment. Chapter three describes the subjective turn of theology (i.e. the turn to make subjective experience the foundation of the Christian religion). Chapter four lays out the shifting understanding of the meaning of traditional doctrines as the various orthodox (or conservative) parties responds to credibility crisis of the Christian faith. Chapter five focuses on the question of the authority to interpret the faith and justification of orthodoxy at the beginning of the 20th century. Chapter six describes how the self-understanding of the churches emerging in the middle of the 20th century, seeing themselves more as witnesses and servants rather than powerful institutions.

Pelikan's erudition is simply stupendous. He studies many now obscure (but popular in their own times) theological handbooks, in Latin, German, Russian etc., that even most professional historians have neither the ability nor the patience to digest. The result is a moving narrative of the three major traditions in its struggle against the skepticism and rationalism of modern culture.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine, Vol. 5: Christian Doctrine and Modern Culture (since 1700) (Volume 5)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine, Vol. 5: Christian Doctrine and Modern Culture (since 1700) (Volume 5)

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: church history, christianity