Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$5.06
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by brit-books-usa
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Shipped with Premium Postal Service within 24hrs to the USA with delivery time of 7 - 14 days.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Eagle of the Ninth Chronicles (The Eagle of the Ninth / The Silver Branch / The Lantern Bearers) Paperback – June 3, 2010

4.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.98 $5.06

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 3, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192789988
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192789983
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 1.6 x 7.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #212,324 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Sheila Margaret Mclean on May 13, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
'The Eagle of the Ninth' trilogy is a series of books about the dying days of the Roman occupation of Britain. The stories are exciting - as much today as when they were first written. Marcus Flavius Aquila is a Roman centurion who is sent to Britain to help quell the various tribes who threaten Rome. After he has been seriously injured and invalided out of the army, his future is uncertain. He has a cloud hanging over him - his own father, who commanded the Ninth Legion, marched off with them into the Scottish mists, and disappeared. Marcus, along with a slave he has purchased, Esca, sets out to clear his father's name and to bring back the Eagle. In doing this, he and Esca undergo many adventures, and face many dangers. Esca is a member of one of the very tribes the Romans fear, but a friendship develops between slave and master as their quest goes on.
The books go beyond the lifetime of Marcus - the second and third books follow the lives of his descendants, right up to the final days, when the Romans leave Britain for good, extinguishing their beacons before they sail away.
These books were written for children, but are every bit as good to read for adults. I suppose they would be classed as pre-teen and early teen. There is plenty of action, and some very tense situations, because Britain was the object of interest to more peoples than the Romans. The Saxons also appear, and the nature of Britain changes yet again.
I recommend these books for all ages, having recently re-read all three.
Britain is a mongrel nation, and that comes out in these books, and might even instill a desire to learn more about the things portrayed. It did that with me when I first became acquainted with them forty years ago.
1 Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was actually surprised to find this volume to contain not the one book I had ordered but three. I had seen the film based on the book and was intrigued enough to want to read the original. What a nice surprise to have the related The Silver Branch and The Lantern Bearers in one volume.

I read Rosemary Sutliff in high school more years ago than I care to recall and liked what I read. In the decades since I had not read anything by her until The Eagle of the Ninth and I must say that I have missed out. There will be those who don't have the level of interest that I do and they will probably not care for the works but if you've liked her King Arthur books as I have, then you will want to read these three as well.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My favorite work, by my favorite writer. If you think of Rosemary Sutcliff as only a writer of children's stories, you need to get to know her better. There's no blood and gore, so seemingly necessary for today's fiction. Instead, here are three well crafted stories that follow a family through the rise and fall of Roman Britain. There is plenty of emotion, excitement and danger. The writing is so descriptive you can smell the heather and feel the mists. It's a journey back in time told by a master storyteller.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Though the author wrote these historical novels decades ago, they are fresh, interesting, and enjoyable. The book version of 'Eagle of the Ninth' outshines the movie, and it was really good!
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
These are clearly well written, well researched books that take the perspective of a single family - the Roman Aquila family - over a span of a few hundred years from the height of the Roman Empire in Britain in book 1 to its literal last days in book 3. It's a great story device in that events and people are linked over all three books not in a forced way but in a very nice understated manner that for the most part works beautifully. I really liked that the story allowed us to see all 3 sides of the main players in that era of British history: The Romans, the native British and the invading Saxons, and give us real insights into all 3. I also essentially loved the 3 stories - they're cracking reads, with great overarching themes of loyalty, honour and courage that all characters display on some level.

There's always a 'but' and mine aren't huge, I did give it 4 stars after all. Perhaps it's a reflection of the storytelling of the era and the audience (Sutcliff wrote these in the 50s for a young adult audience)but for those of us used to reading Roman army stories this one might come off as a bit 'tame' and light on in the battle scenes. She tends to skip over and summarise, getting to the end of these parts as if the audience would be too squeamish. One of the few times she doesn't do this (the battle of the basilica in book 2) proves to be one of the most engaging scenes in the 3 books: I'm not necessarily after gladius-to-the-hilt details, but she might have spent more time on the fight scenes.

One other related criticism; particularly in book 3, Sutcliff tends to jump years at a time and summarise whole periods (6 years passed before ...) and this happens 2-3 times in book 3. I thought she might have handled this a bit better.
Read more ›
2 Comments One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What is there to review? I meet up with Rosemary Sutclffe's "Eagle of the Ninth, nearly 55 years ago then listened avidly to the BBC's radio series ( and I can still sing, albeit, very off tune, the signature marching song "Twas a long march, a long march and twenty years or more, since I kissed the girl at Clusium".

That lady introduced me, and no doubt, many others of my generation, to a love of historical fiction, and only recently I had the pleasure of introducing her stories to my young great niece, whose mother scolded me because her daughter didn't sleep that night reading those wonderful stories - she (the mother) later admitted her subsequent addiction to Ms Sutcliffe wonderful stories!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews