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Cider Beans, Wild Greens, and Dandelion Jelly: Recipes from Southern Appalachia Hardcover – June 1, 2010

4.4 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

With authenticity, and with great love for the traditions of the area, Aller offers recipes that speak of tradition, as well as newer recipes in the ever-changing landscape of cuisine. --In Mamas Kitchen, May 24, 2010

As soon as I opened Cider Beans, Wild Greens and Dandelion Jelly Recipes of Southern Appalachia by Joan Aller I knew it was full of recipes that I had to cook this summer. ... And make no mistake; these recipes are a chef's take on country food. Aller's recipes are fine-tuned with a simple elegance. --DolceDolce, May 21, 2010

Fortunately, for all foodies and lovers of hearty food that feeds both body and soul, Joan Aller unearths a mother lode of southern Appalachian sustenance for "Cider Beans, Wild Greens, and Dandelion Jelly: Recipes from Southern Appalachia" --Appalachain News, May 19, 2010

"Joan Aller is an artist by profession and fearless by nature. No soon had she painted her mailbox than she was off, photographing barns and bridges and learning the ways of her new neighbors. That led quickly to food -- and five years of research. At the end, she had gorgeous photographs of Southern Appalachia, luscious photographs of Southern food, and 8,000 pages of recipes and history. The good news is that Ms. Aller and her editors put her work on a diet. The result is a 212-page book that was extravagantly handsome until my wife and I started dog-earing the pages. Silly us -- we want to cook almost everything here." --Huffington Post, June 24, 2010

"Joan Aller's "Cider Beans, Wild Greens and Dandelion Jelly" tackles the foods of southern Appalachia with credit to the native and immigrant cultures that spawned them." --Associated Press,

"Joan Aller's cookbook Cider Beans, Wild Greens, and Dandelion Jelly: Recipes from Southern Appalachia reminds me of the way my grandparents cooked when I was coming up." ... So, if you're looking for a nice introduction to Southern cuisine, or Southern Appalachia cuisine in particular, with all the history and folklore that goes along with it, then this book is for you." --Project Foodie, July 10, 2010

About the Author

 When California native Joan E. Aller moved to the mountains of east Tennessee, she immediately felt like she had come home. Since moving there, Aller has dedicated herself to preserving the beauty, culture, and traditions of the region through her photography, painting, and writing, and by collecting the best recipes southern Appalachia has to offer.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing (June 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0740779583
  • ISBN-13: 978-0740779589
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 0.9 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #749,427 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jesse Kornbluth on June 24, 2010
Format: Hardcover
"My place, in the midst of this abundance of nature, is back in a mountain hollow on a bad dirt road surrounded by forest, wild blackberries, mountain critters, wildflowers, a few neighbors, and a passel of 'dawgs.'"

So writes Joan Aller, author of this season's must-have cookbook, "Cider Beans, Wild Greens, and Dandelion Jelly: Recipes from Southern Appalachia."

And it's not like Joan Aller is an East Tennessee native who's walked the Appalachian trail with the likes of Bill Bryson or South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford. She's from the West, and might be living there still but for urban sprawl and environmental ugliness. So she first moved to Nashville, which is very much a city, and then further East.

Joan Aller is an artist by profession and fearless by nature. No soon had she painted her mailbox than she was off, photographing barns and bridges and learning the ways of her new neighbors. That led quickly to food --- and five years of research. At the end, she had gorgeous photographs of Southern Appalachia, luscious photographs of Southern food, and 8,000 pages of recipes and history.

The good news is that Ms. Aller and her editors put her work on a diet. The result is a 212-page book that was extravagantly handsome until my wife and I started dog-earing the pages. Silly us --- we want to cook almost everything here. Our only non-starters: Appalachian wine, root beer and --- no kidding --- moonshine.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've never read a cookbook quite like this one before. Not only do we get great dishes, but a history of this beautiful region. The book is rich with stories, phrases and local folks who inspired Aller to put it all on paper for generations to enjoy. The dishes are easy to prepare and unbelieveably delicious. Thank you, Ms Aller, for giving us this beautiful book, it's truely a treasure!
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Format: Hardcover
This is no mere cookbook, as it belongs just as much to the kitchen as it does on the coffee table for guests to lavish their appetites over extraordinary recipes, eyes captured by the vivid images that few in this day and time witness and a captivating history and culture whisking us away to a very special place described so very aptly by Ms Joan Aller. I'm Robert, Linda's husband, and as a Brooklyn-born, 'citified', young man who had travelled the world by age 21, I had never experienced the beauty of the ancient green hills of eastern Kentucky or the lush mountains of West "by God" Virginia until marrying a mountain gal 42-years-ago. She introduced me to some of the most humble and hospitable 'folks' I'd ever encountered and was filled-to-the-gills with food at every stop at my new family's homes. I soon grew to love Blue Grass music and the simple fare of fried taters, "soup beans"(pinto beans cooked forever), wild greens, unsweetened cornbread either baked or skillet-fried like pancakes to crumble in the beans to 'sop-up' every bit of their goodness, and usually(especially on Sunday) some famous, Kentucky-fried, free-range chicken that invariably had cackled its day away in the yard that very morning. To top meals off one might be lucky enough to have a piece of apple pie(resembling an english or Tortola torte) served in stacks for special occasions like at the family graveyards where kinfolk from as far away as Indiana, Michigan or nearby Ohio would gather for Memorial Day visits every year without fail.

I have been up 'hollers' so far that I had surely left civilization most certainly and found my own Nirvana with a lunch(dinner) of biscuits and fresh buttermilk.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This book doesn't reflect Southern Appalachian culture or cooking at all. Instead it reflects the foods The dishes covered by the book are basically with a few exceptions those from Inns throughout the region, these establishment were never meant to be cultural arbiters. This book also doesn't cover any of the heirloom varieties that have been so important here. Our area is known for clinging to heirloom beans, tomatoes and apples in particular. There is no mention of greasy bean, white half runners, lazy house wife beans, rattlesnake beans, October beans, cornfield beans, hillbilly tomatoes, morgage lifter tomatoes Cherokee purple tomatoes or the forgotten apple varieties we have held so dear all with very specific uses to be used according to the time of year. For example we have a 100 year old apple tree grafted from a tree much older than that, it's only use is for a late summer frying apple when the apple is still green. The apple is pretty wonderful later in the year, but it distinctly isn't used or eaten much any other way or after ripening. Neither does it tell you how to find and identify the 'wild greens,' or even use them in the recipes. It instead uses commonly found alternatives.
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