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Citizens Paperback – May 11, 2010

4.0 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Ringo is author of the New York Times best-selling series known by most as “The Posleen Wars” comprising A Hymn Before Battle, Gust Front, When the Devil Dances, Hell’s Faire, plus the tangential novels Calley’s War, Sister Time, and Honor of the Clan (all with Julie Cochrane), and A Watch on the Rhine and Yellow Eyes (both with Tom Kratman). He also co-authored—with David Weber—March Upcountry, March to the Sea, March to the Stars and We Few in the best-selling Prince Roger series. He had visited 23 countries by the time he graduated high school. A veteran of the 82nd Airborne, he brings first-hand knowledge of military operations to his fiction.

Brian M. Thomsen was an editor at Warner Books (where he was one of the founders of their Questar SF and fantasy line), then later at TSR, and finally did freelance editing for Tor Books. He was nominated for the Hugo Award for best editor, was the author of two novels (Once Around the Realms and The Mage in the Iron Mask), several nonfiction books, over forty short stories, and edited fifteen anthologies. He also served as a World Fantasy Award judge. He died of a heart attack on September 21, 2008.

 
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Baen (May 11, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1439133476
  • ISBN-13: 978-1439133477
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.8 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,869,163 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Citizens (2010) is an SF anthology. It contains fifteen short stories, an introduction, and two afterwords. All the stories were written by those who have worn their country's uniform, some in combat.

- Nature and Nurture by John Ringo is an introduction to the stories.

- Field Test (Analog, 1976) by Keith Laumer relates the first use of a Bolo Mark XX Model B.

- Allamagoosa (Astounding, 1955) by Eric Frank Russell tells of the trials of a navy ship returning after a long voyage to find that the Inspector General will soon be visiting them.

- Exploration Team (Astounding, 1956) Murray Leinster concerns an illegal colony on a planet that receives an unexpected visit from a Colonial Survey officer.

- Superiority (F&SF, 1951) by Arthur C. Clarke considers the risks of new technology. This seems to be a recurring theme in military and naval SF.

- The Horars of War (Nova 1, 1970) by Gene Wolfe illustrates the comradery of war.

- Fireproof (Astounding, 1949) by Hal Clement shows the strange effects of a weightless environment.

- Peace with Honor (Analog, 1971) by Jerry Pournelle relates an incident in the history of the CoDominium.

- Under the Hammer (Galaxy, 1974) by David Drake presents an untrained recruit with a situation.

- Time Piece (If, 1970) by Joe W. Haldeman talks of Heaven and Hells in the Forever War.

- Neither Sleet, Nor Snow, Nor Alien Invasion... (first publication) by Dave Freer reveals the power of Political Incorrectness.

- Light (first publication) by Kacey Grannis recounts a mysterious intervention within Iraq.

- The Question (first publication) by Patrick A. Vanner gives the response to an innocent question.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like Ringo's work and I like these kinds of books. That was my biggest problem, as I read this book I kept asking myself, "Haven't I read this story before?"

There were some that definitely were new, and I liked the one based on the Freehold novels by Mike Williamson. However, I was expecting the book to be mostly new content and all I can say is that I'm sure several of the stories appeared before, perhaps in the There Will be War anthologies by Pournelle.

If you've read a lot of this type of material you'll probably find that you've read several of these stories too :(

Also, I thought the book said it was 400 pages...
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This brings back wonderful memories of these legendary science fiction writers – and citizen warriors – with stories of science fiction military adventure tales. Asimov, Heinlein, Clarke, Laumer, Wolfe, and other greats are included. I received this in new condition and at a reasonable price. I highly recommend it.
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Format: Paperback
Citizens
John Ringo & Brian M. Thomsen editors

I don't have much use for the art of the short story, this in spite of trying my had at the craft from time to time. They seem to me to be....well too short. In this volume of military science fiction I have been forced to change my attitude. We get some very cool stuff here.
The concept for the book I also view with approval. All of the authors are military veterans. It is a book of futuristic warriors by men who were themselves uniformed arms bearers. Nice.
The authors of course are excellent. Some of them are at the top of the genre, giants of the pen. We may include Robert A. Heinlein and Jerry Pournelle in this group. Also added there are Keith Laumer, Murray Lienster and the immortal Arthur C. Clarke. Clark like to live in Ceylon and managed to change the laws there so that expatiates who made their money by writing did not have their overseas earnings taxed there. Famous? Well John Ringo and David Drake, still hale and still writing prolifically, reside in good company here. Hal Clement and Michael Z. Williamson each contribute a story.
Lesser known names but not lesser in talent are Gene Wolfe, Joe W. Halderman, Dave Freer, Patrick A. Vanner and the only woman contributor Kacey Grannis.
Each has a story to tell. Some, like the Grannis story “Light” are set in contemporary times. She slips into the super natural. Some, like Heinlein's “The Long Watch” are in the not so distant future. But all of them involve the twin military virtues of heroism and sacrifice in some manner. These are tales to invigorate the blood and to irrigate the eyes.
Even if you are like me and skeptical of the very idea of the short story, give his one a try. These tales are crafted by masters.
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A very interesting compilation of future military fiction written by military vets. I thoroughly enjoyed the departure from reality that it provided while not departing from human nature and the realities of combat in any age.
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Format: Paperback
As a whole this is an excellent collection for anyone who enjoys science fiction or military science fiction. There are a few stories I didn't enjoy but for the most part it was a roarin' good time.

Nature and Nurture by John Ringo is an introduction to the stories.

- Field Test (Analog, 1976) by Keith Laumer
I didn't quite like the layout of this story but I think it was a great way to start off the book.

- Allamagoosa (Astounding, 1955) by Eric Frank Russell
At first I thought this was going to be a boring story, but I have to admit it is one of the first times I have ever laughed out loud while reading.

- Exploration Team (Astounding, 1956) Murray Leinster
This story was decent but I can't say it really impressed me.

- Superiority (F&SF, 1951) by Arthur C. Clarke
I enjoyed this story, it has an ironic and plausible tone.

- The Horars of War (Nova 1, 1970) by Gene Wolfe
Eh, this one was alright. Can't say I was too blown away by it but I'd give it a 5/10.

- Fireproof (Astounding, 1949) by Hal Clement
This one was interesting but not exactly fun, it definitely high-lights the science in science fiction.

- Peace with Honor (Analog, 1971) by Jerry Pournelle
I enjoyed this story, even if the protagonist is a dirty politician.

- Under the Hammer (Galaxy, 1974) by David Drake
This was pretty good, a little too short but I may have to check out some of Drake's work.

- Time Piece (If, 1970) by Joe W. Haldeman
Also pretty good, it reminded me a good bit of Haldeman's Forever War.

- Neither Sleet, Nor Snow, Nor Alien Invasion... (first publication) by Dave Freer
Not as witty as Allamagoosa but every bit as funny.
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