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Clean Disruption of Energy and Transportation: How Silicon Valley Will Make Oil, Nuclear, Natural Gas, Coal, Electric Utilities and Conventional Cars Obsolete by 2030 by [Seba, Tony]
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Clean Disruption of Energy and Transportation: How Silicon Valley Will Make Oil, Nuclear, Natural Gas, Coal, Electric Utilities and Conventional Cars Obsolete by 2030 Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 85 customer reviews

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Length: 291 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Details

  • File Size: 18373 KB
  • Print Length: 291 pages
  • Publication Date: June 16, 2014
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00L2M7UK8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #180,652 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Todd Allyn Flach on July 22, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought the kindle version and it was full of formatting errors. Graphics that did not scale. Repeated texts. Shame! The content was engaging but it was like trying to admire a work of art behind a very dirty glass case.
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I enjoyed reading this book as it has quite a number of thought provoking ideas. It is also very well researched and up to date with the most recent developments in this area (July 2014).

Why I didn't give it 5 stars? At times the book feels a little rushed with a fair bit of typos (of the sort 'a utility spent $600 on the clean-up of its nuclear plant site', 'total investment equals EUR 600 billion = USD 800 million') and some mistakes (like a whole argument is made about the next Tesla Model X being half price of the Model S whereas in reality the X will probably be marginally more expensive than the S). Also the Kindle formatting made it hard to follow at times.

Other than that the author has done a great job. Recommended.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent and informative but it would be helpful if the author would bring out a new edition based upon 2016 figures. (i) 2012 and 2013 figures, as used in the book, are so out of date in this rapidly changing world. (ii) It would also be good if he drew attention to the pressures which the large utility companies in the US are taking to slow down the installation of domestic systems which will result in the adoption of domestic solar energy when batteries are more efficient so as to cut out the utility distribution control and costs. (iii) include more information on all the realistic technologies for domestic energy storage.
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The writing style is really casual and unintelligent. He does nothing to address the difficulties with implementing solar and wind on the scale he is talking about. All of his predictions are based off of analogy or questionable extrapolation. There are some good arguments about the superior business models of renewables and a decent amount of data, but there is no objectivity in the analysis.

The claim on the front cover is obviously false. In fact, it is pretty laughable given the recent drop in natural gas and oil prices. Maybe renewables will overtake conventional energy sources eventually, but the authors wants to push this to such an extreme case of advocacy that he sacrifices objective analysis.

The final thing that made me dislike this book is that all of the figures are of such poor printed quality that they are unreadable.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is not a serious book on the topic. This is a hymn book for those looking to celebrate green technology without considering evidence. Most amazingly, the book proves the opposite of its theme: it shows that solar power is currently a failure and is not disrupting traditional energy yet.

If all of this sounds harsh, it is because I felt the author was deceitful in selecting evidence and withholding other crucial evidence. Let me explain.

The author repeatedly cites Australia as a model of success for solar power. The country has the sunniest weather in the world, which is ideal for capturing solar energy and powering the nation. Moreover, the Australian government has enacted policies and provided subsidies to ensure solar power is embraced by the country. The result of these ideal circumstances, says the author, is that one out of ten homes in Australia has solar power installed.

In discussing other countries and other states in the U.S., the author frequently cites Australia as the model. If only California or other states would go the way of Australia, they too could have the same success.

And what is Australia’s success? A quick check on Wikipedia shows that Australia currently receives 1% of its electricity from solar power. One percent! This is the successful result of ideal financing, sunny weather and governmental policies? By this measure, if 100% of Australian homes had solar power installed on their roofs, the country would still only receive 10% of its electricity from solar power.

Of course, this one-percent statistic is omitted from the book. The book boasts how much of Denmark’s total electricity is generated from wind (19.
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Fantastic read about technology and innovation related to energy and its posible impact , a bit too bullish for my taste ... specifically when the author talk about the cost of solar energy he forgot the big subsidies that pressure budgets in countries such as Germany nowadays , he shallowly mentioned something ... but in any way receives similar treatment he gives to fossil fuels . Thats why I took a star, but the book it's indeed fantastic
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A fast paced book that makes a pretty convincing case for solar power and interesting predictions on its disruptive quality to the detriment of coal, oil, gas and nuclear industries together with the expected and unavoidable rise of the electric vehicle and autonomous cars and the interesting repercussions on the industries involved with some getting a double hit from both disruptive factors mentioned.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very informative and persuasive, but I thought the author was trying too hard to persuade readers that by 2030 there would be a rapid conversion to solar power and cars that drive themselves. It may be true, but was not intended to be fair.
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