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A Clockwork Orange (Norton Critical Editions) Reprint Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 42 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0393928099
ISBN-10: 0393928098
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Anthony Burgess (1917–1993) is the author of many works, including A Clockwork Orange, The Wanting Seed, Nothing Like the Sun, Honey for the Bears, The Long Day Wanes, The Doctor Is Sick, and ReJoyce.

Mark Rawlinson is Senior Lecturer at the University of Leicester. His books include British Writing of the Second World War, Pat Barker, The Second World War in British Fiction Since 1945, and Camouflage: Modern War and Visual Culture.
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Product Details

  • Series: Norton Critical Editions
  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (January 4, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393928098
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393928099
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.8 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #73,879 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Anthony Peters on December 30, 2011
Format: Paperback
Well oh my little brothers, patient and tolerant though I may be, I just couldn't help but have a malenky smeck at some of the grazhny customer reviews by the like indignant vecks and ptitsas here. Like the starry ptitsa who creeches about the like excessive ultraviolence, saying this is not her idea of "entertainment". Personally droogies, I find Burgess's ingenious creation of a whole new vernacular language and youth subculture to be hilariously horrorshow entertaining. The more specific point the naysayers miss is that Burgess is using the violence merely as a vehicle to pose some deep moral questions about the nature of morality and the seeming impossibility of expunging violence from the human soul. A lot of reviewers are also falling into the trap of thinking that Burgess intended merely to shock or to sensationalise, which couldn't be further from the truth. His tongue is very firmly in cheek. Persevere through the first chapter or so and the nadsat becomes strangely "right", somehow enhancing the realness of the world Burgess creates. 4 stars rather than five only because of a redemption story in the final chapter which doesn't quite fit. Nevertheless, this remains a courageous and darkly comedic philosophical masterpiece which will reward those willing to push through the intimidating language.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Just so you know, the Kindle version of the Norton edition is just the novel and Burgess' intro. It doesn't contain the supplementary materials that make a Norton edition valuable to have.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've used the previous edition, but this new edition has footnotes and really brings into context more clearly what's going on in this story. It also provides a lot of Burgess' own ideas into the fold of things. I could've lived without references to the film, but that's just me. I would've liked more contemporary criticism as I'll be teaching this in the Winter. Still, a vast improvement from Norton in regards to their previous edition.
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A clockwork orange by Anthony Burges was first written in 1962 is a completely different type of novel that one would expect to read at the first place. When I started reading the novel for the first time it seemed boring and the language was also very difficult. The author uses a lot of slang words. The main character of the novel is a 14 year old named Alex when the novel starts. The novel is very violent. The author has used a very challenging vocabulary other than the standard language. I really liked some of the words like milicents droogs and devochkas are used to describe the police, brothers and girls I mean that seemed cool. Initially when I read the book it seemed to be very disturbing and boring, Alex seems like a complete psychopath at the beginning but then he kind of changes This is a classic book it may seem very boring at times and you might not want to read it but as the novel goes the story becomes more and more intriguing.. I started liking this book when I read the fourth of it. It was easy to understand after a while even a glossary of the words is given at the back to get familiar with the terms used by the writer. I read it thoroughly with attention so I could understand even the more minute details about the story. You might want to read it more than once also. Like there is part in the book where Alex jumps from an apartment window. Before jumping off he says, “I shut my glazzies and fell the cold winds on my litso, then I jumped. “ After this line he tells that, “I jumped, O my brothers, and fell on the sidewalk hard, but I did not snuff it, oh no if I had snuffed it I would not be here to write what I have written.” This is first time I got to know that Alex is actually writing the story otherwise it’s like he is just telling his story.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
In conclusion to reading A Clockwork Orange, I believe this an amazing read. Yes, yes you may have seen the movie recently on Netflix but that does injustice to the book. The way Anthony Burgess (the author) creates another language, and the book manipulates you by making you learn a different language by the end! This book brings up very controversial events, that may make your stomach turn. But these topics are real, this is based of an era of boys who were called Teddy Boys. Now, a Teddy Boy is a young teenage boy who would dress in Edwardian clothing, this is all happening in Europe. They would dress in high fashion, and would deceive the public. By dressing up in such high fashion they gave off the impression that they were rich well behaved boys, however they would commit crimes in the night. This gave Edwardian clothing a very bad name, dropping the price, making it easier to be accessed by troubled young teens. That was a little background on the history behind why Burgess created this novel. Even though it was fictional, it was based of any error of troubled teens, “Teddy Boys”. I believe our generation should read this book, because it provides a different view on the stereotyping of a young teenagers (I mean come on we are generalized as “Generation Wuss” by Bret Easton Ellis). Our generation typically relies on likes and social media for attention and self confidence. “We”, not all, also tend to act like the victim so when the times get rough we would rather have the easy way out or someone else help us and hold our hand. This book shows behaviors similar to the way our generation acts, the dressing up and acting out for attention. Yes, they may be different but they are generally the same. If you get a chance to read this book, it is amazing and it has so many topics brought up that are worth the analyzing and understanding!
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