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Showing 1-10 of 14 reviews(1 star). See all 157 reviews
on April 2, 2015
This was a great book, but now it is obsolete, filled with ideas from the late 1990s. The business and technology world has changed, and we all learned. It is nice to look at the past, but now we need to plan for the future.
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on November 13, 2001
A tour de blase that left me wishing I could get back the time I wasted reading it. The authors seem self-absorbed and must think that everything they say is really cute and dripping with insight. Maybe "cluetrain" would have been prophetic had it come out 5 years earlier, but I was left feeling "so what?" and "that's all you could think of?". And if it was all they could think of, they were successful at delivering in the most stupefyingly annoying way. Reminds me of some over-the-hill pot-bellied geezers who hobble with their guitar to the stage with the assistance of walkers and beller "ARE U READY TO ROCK?" and fall down. A joke compared to truly visionary and skillfully crafted works like Gilder's "Telecosm", this sad drivelly rag should be propelled to an obscure cut-out bin and their website disbanded.
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on February 22, 2000
What makes a brilliant web page does not make a brilliant book. The authors are right about certain things: networked markets learn fast. Buzzwords prevent actual communication. But... the book is a big sloppy mess. The authors unfortunately are clueless about the history of business, of economics, or about how most people actually live. The book is long rant, repeating the same thoughts over and over, but terribly short on substance. The only example of the power of their new way of thinking is a story about how United made some people on a newsgroup like them. That's about it, folks. The biggest problem is the idea that before the web, we were all big slugs absorbing info from the TV, and since the web, we are all zooming around reading newsgroups and talking to people about every purchase we make. I wish the authors had spent more time talking to actual everyday people, instead of their fellow hardcore webheads. A bit of perspective would have helped them a lot.
Their take on industrialization is also pretty silly. A little time spent reading about the history of business would have helped them a lot. The last section of the book goes totally off the deep end, offering the bombing of Dresden and Hiroshima as examples of why they're right. Whatever, guys. It can be fun to read (and some of the contributors are a whole lot smarter than others) but ultimately, there's nothing there. The ideas are appealing, you *want* to believe the whole thing, but when you start noticing the really bad assumptions the authors have made, the lack of concrete examples of anything, the incredibly repetition, you just can't. And it's a shame, because there are some really provocative ideas here that shouldn't be dismissed, however badly the authors have presented them. Read the web site and think about what it says; don't waste your time and money on the book.
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on February 23, 2000
One of my employees bought some copies of this book for his department and I was pretty excited to read it, I'd heard about it a lot from him when it was a webpage.
I finally got around to reading it, and sorry, it really wasn't that hot. A lot of rhetoric that sounds great, and it may make a lot of managers happier to read this and think they're suddenly savvy 21st century marketers, but I think all in all maybe you should just get the less pretentious Tony Robbins book that this so desperately wants to be. That's the category this book fills for me: Books people read to feel smart, that don't really have insights that are as great as they think they are.
After all, if this book really was revolutionary, would it really be selling to the very businesspeople it aims to educate as much as it is?
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on May 23, 2000
This repetative, poorly written book was a waste of money, offering little in the way of useful insights. In the book, the authors constantly slam Corporate America for overpromisinng and undelievering -- which is exactly what this book does. The dust jacket promises much, but this book never delivers anything valuable.
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on October 21, 2001
Four dot.com gasbags make a couple of simple-minded observations and then pound them into the ground with sledge hammers for 190 excruciatingly tedious pages. Don't waste your time or money on this fatuous exercise in internet buffoonery.
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on September 6, 2000
This book will appeal to anyone who doesn't know anything about the web and is dissatisfied with business in general. The book could have been nicely condensed into a sentence: Online conversations are changing the way we do business. Duh? Save your money.
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on April 25, 2000
The only thing worse in this book than the thinking is the writing. This is 'Wired' at its earliest, headiest and most childish. In fact it was Kevin Kelly, the editor of 'Wired' whose writings in the early nineties were naive, perhaps, but fresh and challenging. But now that's just old hat. The world has moved on. At precisely the point where the 'new economy' has to get real and start thinking about serious issues of business models, legal framework, and value creation, these authors treat us to an incoherent and intellectually lazy diatribe about how everything's different. And Kelly at least was eloquent: this book is repetitious, loose and amateur.
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on January 3, 2001
I originally bought this book thinking that it might contain some useful business information. Surprise! It doesn't! Cluetrain Manifesto is nothing more than the ramblings of a number of self-appointed dot-com smart guys who have little or no experience in the real world of profit and loss. As the recent and ongoing dot-com implosion so aptly demonstrates, this balloon -- and this book -- is filled with nothing more than hot air.
Don't bother.
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on October 12, 2001
This book is useful only if you want to understand the delusions of true believers in the Internet mania. Otherwise, don't bother. As dated as Y2K.
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